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I have a savage arms .308 with a stainless steel barrel. I noticed after cleaning it, alot of wear and scratches on the inside of my barrel near crown. I also noticed whst looks like to be rust? Correct me if I'm wrong but I thought stainless didn't corrode. Is this any cause for worry orvis this normal wear? I am a fairly new gum enthusiast and still a green horn so any advice would help greatly. Picture of barrel attached. 20160501_232121.jpg
 

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Saturate a patch with solvent (Hoppe's No. 9 or equivelent) and wet that area. Let it set a few hours, follow with another solvent soaked patch and repeat as required. That is just bullet jacket "gilding metal" and letting solvent "dwell" will dissolve it. As per the solvent instructions.

Seems we had a similar photo claiming the same concern but a few weeks back.

"I am a fairly new gum enthusiast........"

They are only manufactured once a year, but try Beeman's, Black Jack and Clove brands.
 

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Haha letters are too close. Did this from my phone so instead of proof readimg, I just look for red underlined words and lucky me gum is also a word hah
 

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Ancient Gaseous Emanation
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Its nothing to worry about. Clean the bore (all of it, not just the muzzle area) as described above by the jetman.
 

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Use something like Sweet's 7.62 or any of the modern bore cleaners. You, should use a Non-Embedding bore emulsion such as J-B and follow the instructions. Cleaning modern stainless and quality Carbon Steel barrels requires cleaning that is also modern. Use the proper bore jag and and fiber bore brushes. When cleaning give special attention to the chamber throat. The crown should always be cleaned from the chamber forward. :wink:
 

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Newbs sometimes mistake copper fouling for rust. Although your pics are pretty good it's still hard to make out all the details. You can see the tool marks from the machining which is normal for an economy grade barrel. There may be longitudinal scratches or gouges which is where most of the copper fouling will fill. They may have come from improper cleaning. You don't want the cleaning rod to contact the bore especially at the crown. The crown area has the greatest effect on accuracy.

Carbon and crud is always the enemy and should be cleaned. Some believe as I do that minor copper fouling can be tolerated or even beneficial. Solvents are abundant and most do a decent job if you do your part. A little soak and a little scrub. I'm a Frog lube guy and think it reduces buildup. I use their solvent/degreaser too but don't recommend it for copper fouling. I have some J B bore paste that does a great job. I think it does some minor lapping too. I recommend following the directions and not get too carried away.
 

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Below borescope photos of a Savage button rifled barrel.


Before and after fire lapping



Below even after fire lapping the rough bore still picks up copper.



Below a custom made hand lapped barrel.



There is no fix for your factory barrel and the barrel will eat copper bore brushes and be a waste of time. So just get some foam bore cleaner and let the foam do all the work.

Below a 1943 .303 British Enfield rifle with a frosted bore and just one shot of foam bore cleaner and left to sit overnight. No brushing and minimum cleaning rod time in the bore, spare the rod and spoil the bore.

 

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Good advice and example.

I have two Enfields, a 1948 edition that has markings to signify factory refurbishment and a NIB 1955 edition. The older model takes about 14 Hoppe's soaked-and-dry wipe patches to achieve a clean final patch. The new model takes no more than 4 patches. Evidently the older model barrel is either rougher or tighter in dimension to pick up greater jacket metal than the newer rifle. Yet they both shoot "minute-of-Wehrmacht" out to any range the click-screw adjustable peep-sight can be put on.

Let the solvent soak, overnight if necessary. It is a chemical process of dissolving metal. And it works.
 
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