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When I was a lad of 12 I got a Benjamin 177 cal air pistol. I still have it today. I shot it so much that I wore the finish off of it. I was able to hit a rolling bottle cap at 15’. I could quick snap shoot at almost anything and hit it. I really didn’t use the sights for most shooting.
That got me thinking about shooting now. My eyes aren’t what they were then or even last year. It got me thinking about instinctive shooting again. The next time I hit the club range ( actually the large dirt pile we shoot into) I’m going to put a target up and try some “snap” shooting. What I mean by instinctive is that you don’t use the sights but rather focus on the target and fire at the right moment.
 

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I've heard it called "point shooting." Basically, shooting where your finger points.

I pretty much suck at it, likely because I simply don't practice at it enough.

--Wag--
 

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All the magazines say NOT to point shoot and emphasize sight alignment or at least get the front sight on target. I on the other hand think point shooting works. Try pointing your finger at something in your house without aligning it with your eyes. I don’t know about anyone else but I’m really close most every time. Then try it with your favorite, unloaded, pistol(bore sight lasers work great for this). In a panic, point shooting is all your gonna have time for at first!
 

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This is usually a archery "debate". True "instinctive" would mean that you were born with the ability (or instinct), but what really happens is your brain learns to do something so well, that you no longer need to "think" about it. True instinct is to duck when a ball is coming at your head. What you are talking about is catching the ball.
 

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I started to work on point and shoot skills. And left hand shooting. Then when i joined the club with the longer ranges, That went to the wayside. I need to get the pistols back out.
 
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Keep calm & return fire!
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Just my 2 cents... I practice point shooting. I'm of the opinion that if I'm unfortunately caught in a high stress, highly reactive situation... THIS is how I'm going to be shooting. I'm not going to be aligning sights.
Practice like you're gonna play.
 

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The first pistol I ever shot was a colt SAA 1873. It had belonged to my Great Grandfather and my grandfather had sent it back to Colt and had it converted to 38 Special. Cast wadcutter bullets and Bullseye were cheap so I shot it a lot. To this day I can point and shoot that style pistol with a degree of accuracy that rivals aimed fire. (there is a special condition explained later).

My preferred shotgun is a sxs double. Shotgunning is a point and shoot activity. Again, My grandfather's Mec reloader churned out enough 20 ga shells for me to get better than good at it.

Some time went by. I grew older. One Spring I accompanied the senior class on a free-day outing. One of our stops was at an amusement park that had batting cages. I decided to show the kids how to do it (I batted 460 back in the day. Bating, very much hand eye coordination {point shooting}). I couldn't even get a foul ball much less a solid hit. It was very discouraging. One morning sitting in a duck blind I had two little streaks of lightning coming in at an angle from my right. What should have been an easy double produced only noise. Again and again the same results. It was misting and I took off my glasses to wipe them off. As I was doing that I saw a dot start turning in to a blur. I picked up my shotgun and busted a blue wing teal clean as could be. With out thinking too much about it I put them back on and missed the next shot. I took off the glasses and limited out on the next four shots.

The glasses were magnifying enough to change the position of the target in relation to muscle memory learned and practiced many years before I started wearing glasses.

Now when I bird hunt I don't wear glasses. With ducks I have to keep them on long enough to ID the duck and then take them off. I don't duck hunt much any more.

For whatever reasons I cannot point and shoot a 1911 without consciously tipping the barrel forward. With a Glock and the Colt SAA 1873 I can point and shoot just fine, without my glasses.....

If you pick a firearm and shoot it enough to develop that muscle memory then pointing and shooting will be successful.

It's harder when you're old too. Give a 12 year old boy a 22 and a brick of 22 ammo and tell him that there's plenty more where that came from and by the end of the day he'll be shooting pretty good...


Alan
 

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And, instinctive shooting. In the case of handguns, I believe there is such a thing. We can instinctively point our fingers directly at an object. It is not a learned act. I believe the Colt SAA 1873 is simply an extension of my index finger.

Alan
 

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Another somewhat amusing incident of instinctive point and shoot happened about 15 years ago. I was shooting one day with my BIL and nephew. My nephew had a new Kahr 9 mm and he asked me if I wanted to shoot it. I said "Sure!" and after chambering a round started popping away at a can that we had put on the ground about 10-15 yards away. The dust started flying and the can started hopping around at every shot. Finally it popped straight up in the air and I took one last shot and the can flew straight away into the brush. I turned and handed the pistol back to my nephew and told him it was a nice little pistol. His mouth was open and he was just staring at me. My BIL was contorting in silent laughter because he knew that he'd just seen a blind hog find seven acorns in a row. I was laughing too and I did tell my nephew that it was pure blind luck.

But, luck or not, it was still purely point and shoot and it worked.

I've heard it said that some folks would rather be lucky than good.

Alan
 
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I've heard it called "point shooting." Basically, shooting where your finger points.

I pretty much suck at it, likely because I simply don't practice at it enough.

--Wag--
There is a technique to it. It all starts with the grip. If the grip is not right, everything is much harder.
What I teach people is not "point shooting", but "natural point" shooting. It starts with the grip, YOUR body's natural point, as well as sight alignment. I also show them how to pick a gun that fits their body. The better your gun fits your body, the better you will shoot it. Natural point or aiming. Except for SAA, I suck with a revolver. But I don't hold them like most people do. I love Pythons, can't shoot them for ****. Bisley grips on a SA either. An instructor with the Advance Marksmanship unit showed me why one day and how to pick guns that fit me. Saved me a lot of money and frustration over the years.
Proper gun, proper grip and a relaxed natural position for your body, not mine, will shrink your shot groups in a hurry. No ammo needed.



Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
 

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Last Stand on Earth
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In my opinion, there are two types of point and shoot techniques. There’s blind point and shoot. Like you see fast draw shooters doing, where you never see the gun. It’s usually shot on the draw, from the hip or somewhere where the gun is out of peripheral view. This is the hardest to master.

Then there’s the presentation type point and shoot where focus on the target and you bring the gun up to your line of sight but don’t actually use the sights to align it.

Two very different types of shooting. Both have advantages but you need to practice both.
 

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Point shooting does take practice. Mostly just finding what angle is right for you. And can be done mostly with an empty gun or a Bluegun.
Hip shooting takes a lot of practice and ammo. I ain't very good at that one.
Consistency in grip and stance are key factors in either method.
But when you really get it and get consistent, it is surprising just how accurate you can be with it.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
 

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I've heard it called "point shooting." Basically, shooting where your finger points.

I pretty much suck at it, likely because I simply don't practice at it enough.

--Wag--
Same
 
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Salmon Slayer
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Another somewhat amusing incident of instinctive point and shoot happened about 15 years ago. I was shooting one day with my BIL and nephew. My nephew had a new Kahr 9 mm and he asked me if I wanted to shoot it. I said "Sure!" and after chambering a round started popping away at a can that we had put on the ground about 10-15 yards away. The dust started flying and the can started hopping around at every shot. Finally it popped straight up in the air and I took one last shot and the can flew straight away into the brush. I turned and handed the pistol back to my nephew and told him it was a nice little pistol. His mouth was open and he was just staring at me. My BIL was contorting in silent laughter because he knew that he'd just seen a blind hog find seven acorns in a row. I was laughing too and I did tell my nephew that it was pure blind luck.

But, luck or not, it was still purely point and shoot and it worked.

I've heard it said that some folks would rather be lucky than good.

Alan
Alan, that is the motto I’ve lived by for many years.
I’ve been labeled a great fisherman by others but I always tell them “I’m just Lucky I guess.”

As far as point and shoot goes I am not so lucky, I keep my sights aligned although I do practice offhand quick draw at times when I’m alone.
 
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Practice takes ammo. Reload at will, Boys!

--Wag--
 
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Everything you need to know on this subject is comprehensively described in Chapter IX, Quick Draw & Hip Shooting, pages 161 thru 175, "Sixguns by Keith".

All you need to accomplish this is practice, practice and more continuous practice.
Elmer Keith was an amazing guy who contributed inestimably to the sport!
 
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