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Aim true !
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I was at the gun club today shooting my Mil-surps. And the guy next to me what he was shooting got my curiosity. So i asked. He said it's between a 270 and 30.06 ballistic wise. He was shooting 220 grain. Said he's going for bear this weekend. Im guessing it's not a very common round? 1st time i heard of it.
 
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AZHerper
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I was at the gun club today shooting my Mil-surps. And the guy next to me what he was shooting got my curiosity. So i asked. He said it's between a 270 and 30.06 ballistic wise. He was shooting 220 grain. Said he's going for bear this weekend. Im guessing it's not a very common round? 1st time i heard of it.
It's like a 7mm/06. It's a 7mm (0.284 bore diameter).
 

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There’s a reason why we didn’t tell you about it… just trying to save you some money.

Alan
 

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I have a 280 Remington. It's also called a 7mm Remington Express. 220gr bullet? That's huge for that caliber! Biggest i think i have seen in any loading books is around 164 or 175. I normally shoot 120-140's in mine.
 

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Aim true !
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Yeah i used to have 30.06 in 220 grain core-lokt. I didn't ask much more about his. Maybe they were custom loads. He did say he reloads.
 
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There are a lot of gun owners that are into different calibers that or off the beaten path of normalcy. Back in the old days (my experience only) you either had a 22lr, 30-30 or a 30-06 if you did not load for your rifle.
My dad and his buddies that used to hunt did not re-load, they just bought ammo off the shelf but I will tell you this, they brought home the bacon.
 

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My uncle had a Rem 760 in 280. He killed a lot of deer with it. Cases ca be fire formed from 270 or 30-06 brass. If I recall the shoulder is set forward to prevent manhandling a 280 round into a 270 chamber.

The 280 Rem did not fill a niche, it filled a space.

Alan
 

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Yeah i used to have 30.06 in 220 grain core-lokt. I didn't ask much more about his. Maybe they were custom loads. He did say he reloads.
The '06 is 0.308 bore diameter. The .280 is 0.284. The 30-06 can handle heavier bullets much more readily. However, 220 grains is pushing it even for the 30-06. Just my opinion.
 

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Not familiar with it. Too many out there to try and keep up with them all. Somebody was talking about shooting his 6 Creedmore. I said you mean 6.5 he said no, 6 Creedmore. I looked it up there is a 6.
 
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I hunted blacktail deer and elk with an 06 for many years using 165g and 220g, respectfully. Then out of the blue I bought a Marlin 336 in 30-30 for deer and kept the 06 strictly for elk.
 
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BTW: A 175 grain bullet in the .280 equates to a 223 grain bullet in the 30-06 (mass is a function of the cube (third power) of the linear dimensions.
I shoot some 220gr bullets in my sporterized springfield '06 and it's a big old bullet for a '06 but they do shoot nice out of that rifle. In a .280 it would have to be buried deep in the case or the rifle better have a lot of lead to the rifling.
 

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A 12 to 20 dollar annual subscription to one of the top four gun magazines will go a long ways to keep you informed on cartridges, older and new.

I am surprised folks who own any recent issue of reloading manual haven't exercised natural curiosity and read thru from first to last on cartridge histories.
 

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The most accurate rifle I ever owned was a Ruger77 in .280 Remington. 140gr for deer, 160gr for elk/moose. For all practical purposes the equal in trajectory to the 270, handled slightly heavier bullets. Maybe not the popular winner, but in the end, it’s the results that count, not the rhetoric!
 

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The .280 has been around since, like, FOREVER (Introduced in 1957)! So I'm not surprised to read so many comments on an INTERNET based site that convey no knowledge of it!
The .280 is merely one of a number of rounds derived from the .30'06. The case is identical save for being necked down to .284" caliber which is the same as 7mm. The Remington 7mm Express was another name applied in an attempt to induce sport-buyers to opt for the .280 Remington over the .270 Winchester, which is also necked down from the .30'06 circa 1935.
As for bullet weights, 175 grains is pretty heavy for a 7mm bullet! A 220 grain bullet in .280 caliber would be about 2" long should such a thing exist, which to my knowledge it does not. Even in .308" a 220 grain bullet is quite long for caliber.
The .30'06 is the parent case for the 270 Winchester, 280 Remington, 7mm Express, and even the .308 Winchester which is 51mm long versus the '06 at 63mm long. The .308 is loaded to a higher military spec pressure to allow the military 7.62 x 51 to perform ballistically the same as the .30'06.
Derived from the .308 are also many cartridges such as the 7mm-08, .284 Winchester, and .243 Winchester, as well as the .257 Roberts.
There are a host of rifle calibers that all use the same .473" rim diameter that can be formed from .30'06 cases.
 

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The .280 has been around since, like, FOREVER (Introduced in 1957)! So I'm not surprised to read so many comments on an INTERNET based site that convey no knowledge of it!
The .280 is merely one of a number of rounds derived from the .30'06. The case is identical save for being necked down to .284" caliber which is the same as 7mm. The Remington 7mm Express was another name applied in an attempt to induce sport-buyers to opt for the .280 Remington over the .270 Winchester, which is also necked down from the .30'06 circa 1935.
As for bullet weights, 175 grains is pretty heavy for a 7mm bullet! A 220 grain bullet in .280 caliber would be about 2" long should such a thing exist, which to my knowledge it does not. Even in .308" a 220 grain bullet is quite long for caliber.
The .30'06 is the parent case for the 270 Winchester, 280 Remington, 7mm Express, and even the .308 Winchester which is 51mm long versus the '06 at 63mm long. The .308 is loaded to a higher military spec pressure to allow the military 7.62 x 51 to perform ballistically the same as the .30'06.
Derived from the .308 are also many cartridges such as the 7mm-08, .284 Winchester, and .243 Winchester, as well as the .257 Roberts.
There are a host of rifle calibers that all use the same .473" rim diameter that can be formed from .30'06 cases.
All good, except for the 257 Roberts whose parent case was the 7x57 Mauser.
 

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AZHerper
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The .280 has been around since, like, FOREVER (Introduced in 1957)! So I'm not surprised to read so many comments on an INTERNET based site that convey no knowledge of it!
The .280 is merely one of a number of rounds derived from the .30'06. The case is identical save for being necked down to .284" caliber which is the same as 7mm. The Remington 7mm Express was another name applied in an attempt to induce sport-buyers to opt for the .280 Remington over the .270 Winchester, which is also necked down from the .30'06 circa 1935.
As for bullet weights, 175 grains is pretty heavy for a 7mm bullet! A 220 grain bullet in .280 caliber would be about 2" long should such a thing exist, which to my knowledge it does not. Even in .308" a 220 grain bullet is quite long for caliber.
The .30'06 is the parent case for the 270 Winchester, 280 Remington, 7mm Express, and even the .308 Winchester which is 51mm long versus the '06 at 63mm long. The .308 is loaded to a higher military spec pressure to allow the military 7.62 x 51 to perform ballistically the same as the .30'06.
Derived from the .308 are also many cartridges such as the 7mm-08, .284 Winchester, and .243 Winchester, as well as the .257 Roberts.
There are a host of rifle calibers that all use the same .473" rim diameter that can be formed from .30'06 cases.
The .257 Roberts was developed in the 1920's...way before the .308 (1950's).
 
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