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Discussion Starter #1
I recently inherited some firearms from my dad, when he passed away. They haven't been used in over 45 years!!
I would like to recondition them as required to get them back into usable condition.
In particular, I have a 30-30 Marlin Model 336 lever action, and a Korean-war-era .30 carbine.

Other than running a swab down the barrel with bore-cleaning fluid, what else do I need to do before firing these weapons?
What do I need to do, to lubricate the weapons? Will I need to strip them down to parts, or can I lubricate them intact?

I have U.S. Army manuals for field-stripping the .30 carbine, though honestly they aren't terribly easy to interpret.
I also got the manual for the Marlin, which shows instructions for partially disassembling it, which I can try if necessary; but would like to know if it is recommended before I proceed...

Any advice would be quite welcome
 

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You tube is awesome for how to do. Im cleaning my bore real good currently on my Argentine mauser. I soak brush patch. And repeat until clean.
 

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If there is nothing wrong with the rifles and just have been put up I would use some sort of a bore scope to check the barrels for pitting or rust. If none, just swab out the barrels with a cleaner until patch is clean. Check the manual or you tube for lubrication points and lube it. Check all screws and make sure they are tight. If that carbine is a Korean era Garand make sure you do not use any modern high pressure rounds in it. Use ammo that is safe for use in the Garand.
Other than that i would just enjoy the heck out of them and remember your Dad.
 

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As long as they aren't rusty or damaged just a simple clean and lube will suffice. On the Marlin if you open the lever about halfway and then take out the screw holding it on it will slide out and then the bolt can be taken out too. I do this wheneve ri clean the bore because its best to clean from the breech end whenever possible. There is also an ejector that sits between the bolt and receiver that that sometimes needs a little patience to put in place before you slide the bolt back in on assembly. It's not hard to take then gun down further BUT putting it back together can be frustrating especially when dealing with the main spring. The 30 carbine isn't too hard to take apart either and like Coal said above you can watch it on youtube. Lastly if you do any of this don;t use regular screwdrivers, guns screws aren't tapered and you can bugger them up. Use hollow ground screw drivers only.
 
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Unless you know what you’re doing don’t even turn a screw much less take one of them apart.

Alan
 

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Even seasoned gunsmiths and gun nuts have issues from time to time. If you've just got to break one of them down then do it with someone who knows how to put it back together. You don't want to have to show up at the gun shop with a bag of gun parts.

Then there's always the dreaded "Spoing- pop-clatter-clatter-clatter". That is the sound of "something" popping out of the gun and clattering into the far reaches of whatever room you are in, ultimately going behind or underneath the heaviest object in the room and where there is probably a hole in the floor.....

Alan
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Thank ye all for various comments, I'll take them to heart.
I definitely was hoping not to tear the weapons down if not necessary; that will be fine when I am familiar with them again, but after a 4+ decade absence, caution is better than enthusiasm...
 

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Just a personal opinion (others may vary)... I call my firearms what they are; rifles, pistols, shotguns, etc. I never call them weapons. That's not what they are. Now, they may be used as a weapon, so can a hammer, but they are not weapons in and of themselves.

Alan
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Just a personal opinion (others may vary)... I call my firearms what they are; rifles, pistols, shotguns, etc. I never call them weapons. That's not what they are. Now, they may be used as a weapon, so can a hammer, but they are not weapons in and of themselves.

Alan
Okay, I'm cool with that !!! Although I'm actually thinking of the .30 carbine as a 'weapon', the Marlin certainly isn't, it's more for deer and such (and caribou, when we lived in Alaska).
 

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"...any instrument or device for use in attack or defense in combat, fighting, or war, as a sword, rifle, or cannon. anything used against an opponent, adversary, or victim..."

Weaponry denotes usage. That object (firearm) is inanimate and benign until it is put to use as a tool or as a weapon. Liberals love to call guns "Weapons(!)", it fits the narrative. We'll likely see more of that in the near future. After all only the police and the military NEED weapons, right? Although the police are falling from favor in this regard. According to the current batch of loonies not only do they not need weapons, they don't even need jobs...

Average subjects, uh.. citizens certainly don't need weapons...

That's why I only have rifles, pistols and shotguns, etc,... just in case the Tree of Liberty needs refreshing...

Alan
 

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It's not a conscious thing, it just comes naturally (that's my story and I'm sticking to it).

Alan
 

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Even seasoned gunsmiths and gun nuts have issues from time to time. If you've just got to break one of them down then do it with someone who knows how to put it back together. You don't want to have to show up at the gun shop with a bag of gun parts.

Then there's always the dreaded "Spoing- pop-clatter-clatter-clatter". That is the sound of "something" popping out of the gun and clattering into the far reaches of whatever room you are in, ultimately going behind or underneath the heaviest object in the room and where there is probably a hole in the floor.....

Alan
We can all relate to the flying gun parts. I always wished I could factor in the "Search time" as part of the repair billing. 🙃

Roy
 
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