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Gumball machines. You can make a couple of bucks per machine per week. Initial investment is not that drastic, and you can do your route once every other week.
 

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I have been pretty successful using EBay. Yeah I know they are a lefty liberal anti-gun place. And Paypal is really hard on sellers. My wife and I made some pretty good short term money. We would go to estate sales, swap meets, flea markets one weekend. The next weekend we would pop the stuff on Ebay starting bid at what we bought the item for. Be surprised at the prices people pay for some of the stuff. We decided that it was actually too much work gathering, cleaning, photographing, indexing, selling and shipping. We were just doing it on a lark and really didn't need the extra. So we stopped. Now I pick up stuff now and then; gun parts, camera stuff and I'll throw it up on an auction sight to fund a new gun build project. This has been working for me.

Oh by the way, anyone interested in an 80% M1 Garand receiver? It is a Lithgow and super nice. This is a pre-auction offer.
 
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Dethlokk said:
Glock and Load said:
Gumball machines. You can make a couple of bucks per machine per week. Initial investment is not that drastic, and you can do your route once every other week.
Well, I can't really see myself selling candy... but at the same time, I can't deny the possibility of that being a lucrative home business idea.

Let's hear some more.
Candy, little plastic toys, toy jewelry, supper rubber balls, mini team helmets... the list is endless.
 

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Harley Dude
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My wife and I have a friend that feeds our cats and fish when we travel. She makes a bundle doing that business. Makes her own hours and walks dogs, stops by the homes once or twice per day to feed the critters and clean the cat boxes. Makes 15-20 bucks for twenty minutes work and you could work around another job.

Know a guy that became a notery public, he travels around getting papers signed for banks and insurance companies and makes $50 for each stop. Not a bad business if you can hook up with a lender or other business that needs help on an ongoing basis.

Handyman business. You pick and choose what projects you want to take on and when you want to do them. Many single older ladies need help hanging light fixtures, replacing outlets, switches, fixing toilets parts, hanging pictures, mirrors, etc. 15-25 per hour.

Hauling trash to the dump. Tree triming. Sprinkler system repair. Lots of fun things to do out there.
 
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