National Gun Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A friend wants me to load some high-octane rounds for his Marlin .45-70, using Barnes Triple-Shock X-Bullets for one box (50) and Hornady Dangerous Game Solids for the other box. My manuals list a few options but I wanted to see whether anyone has any experience or suggestions as far as optimizing those loads.
 
G

·
dont have any data for you but would curious as to what you come up with.solids ? must be leaving the country to hunt.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nope, they're for domestic use. He has some old wrecked cars he uses for targets.
 
G

·
ive seen solids pulled out of animals and reloaded again retaining their shape in soft tissue.would be neat to see the penetration into engine blocks and the likes.
 

·
Galactic Effectuator
Joined
·
525 Posts
The Lyman 47th reloading manual has a section on .45-70 for 1886 Winchester and 1895 Marlin only. They show two jacketed bullets (350 and 405 grains) and four lead bullets (293 to 420 grains). Powders range from Unique to IMR 4320.

I would think one could conjure up a starting load for an unlisted bullet out of that pile of data. If you don't have the book (and you should) PM me and I'll fish out some data to get you started.

Lyman's doesn't say, but I would think a healthy crimp would be in order. Lever guns bounce loaded rounds as it is; this round is going to really shake the rounds in the magazine.

Other suggestions include aspirin and liniment. Full power .45-70 loads out of a levergun are going to be - uh - enthusiastic.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
OK, so I should've posted this earlier to answer my own question. After long deliberation and a call to Hornady, plus much cross-checking and double-checking on at least seven or so websites, here's what I came up with:

Marlin 1895XLR .45-70 ONLY - Not for any other type of .45-70 exc. Ruger No. 1 (Use these loads in a Trapdoor Springfield or any antique, you could have an "Elmer Fudd" gun...KaBooom!)

Barnes 300 gr. Cu Hollowpoint
55.7 gr IMR4198 over CCI 200 primer

Hornady 480 gr SP Dangerous Game
52.0 IMR4895 over CCI 200 primer


Each of these loads was calculated using data from the Hornaday Handbook (4th Ed.) and data posted on the company website, taking the average of the max load minus the next lighter load. This gives a load that is more than I would usually use when developing (max -10%) but one which I have found at least one other experienced loader using and one, as I said, was mentioned by the factory rep. Magnum primers are not necessary. The 480 gr load is compressed.

In each case I applied no crimp when seating the projectile but instead used the Lee Factory Crimp Die after seating. That was adjusted as tightly as possible. No, you do NOT want any bullet creep with these baaadboys.

The Hornady rep stressed the necessity that the bullet NOT touch the rifling, and that the 480 gr bullet was actually designed for the .458 Win. Mag., so it is really on the long side for the .45-70. What I did was to seat it as far back as I could, initially, and not crimp it. When my customer came over, I had him bring his rifle so I could verify that the COAL was good and THEN I ran the rounds through the Lee Factory Crimp Die, once I was sure.

As far as the "aspirin and linament", your point is well-taken, Archie. My customer is a fairly big guy (6'6", 330 lbs.) and says he's looking forward to the abuse.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top