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Just means the round you use makes the difference.
I knew what you meant and understand your point.
The numbers I offered were based on the most common loads and bullet weights, sort of a control group for making the determinations.
You do have that option with 9mm but bullet weight on the .380 is not as expansive.
90 to 100 grains is just about all that's available.
The Kimber info was with a 124 grain bullet, the EZ 380 with the 90 grain.
Many people think that a heavier bullet will give more of a recoil.....but in fact it's the other way around due to the charge.
 

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I knew what you meant and understand your point.
The numbers I offered were based on the most common loads and bullet weights, sort of a control group for making the determinations.
You do have that option with 9mm but bullet weight on the .380 is not as expansive.
90 to 100 grains is just about all that's available.
The Kimber info was with a 124 grain bullet, the EZ 380 with the 90 grain.
Many people think that a heavier bullet will give more of a recoil.....but in fact it's the other way around due to the charge.
Off the top of my head, (because I did this yesterday after I posted that) the 100gr @930fps vs 9mm 115gr @1130fps.

The manufacturer posted gun weights for the 9mm Garrison and the 9mm Rapide are both wrong. Mine weigh in empty at 41.68oz and 41.56oz respectively. Over 3.5oz heavier than the published data.
 

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It is possible to over think most things. I will use the example of my maternal grandmother. She was born in 1916 and died in 2016, four months after her 100th birthday. From a young age she was used to shooting one kind of firearm or another. She was a medium sized woman and lived a modest lifestyle with plenty of self imposed hard work. Her early adulthood was strongly shaped by the Great Depression.

To the point. There were few "Ladies" guns. My grandfather gave here a S&W 38 Spl snubby (I started to go look at the model but decided it was unimportant). What is important is that he gave her one and she kept it at hand. To my knowledge she never had occasion to fire it. She did ask me to change out the cartridges once in around 1987 or so. In 2011, or thereabouts, she gave the pistol to me saying, "Bubba, I'm never going to get to shoot anyone with this so you take it"... It still had the same rounds I had put in it all those years prior. She carried the pistol in her purse all through the 1950s in Duval County Texas while she and her husband were helping to bring criminal charges against George Parr. It was a dangerous time. She never had to even produce the pistol for protection much less actually use it, but, it was there. And that is the point, it was there. It provided here with the security of being there and ready if and when she needed it, and that was all that was important.

Recoil? The ergonomics on that little rascal as such that it is rambunctious to shoot and is very loud. But, here's the catch on recoil and noise. If you take your favorite 12 ga out and aim at a target and squeeze one off, you're likely going to get a good kick and some ringing in your ears. When you flush a covey of quail and swing on one and knock him down with that same shotgun there is a good chance you won't even feel the shot. There are thousands of examples of this with all sorts of weapons. In the heat of the moment, if a person ever has to use their firearm for self defense, recoil and noise aren't even going to register. Likewise, trigger pull is not going to be a problem when the BG is beating on the bedroom door. The trigger is going to get pulled.

Additionally, the average BG is not going to stick around to find out if the person they are accosting is shooting a revolver or a high cap semi... Most of them are going to cut a shuck when the loud noises start (and the louder the better).

But, the most important thing about someone having a handgun in their hand is that a very slight change of position of their hand/arm/wrist can have a very large effect on the safety of the weapon. Understanding that is paramount to keeping only the BGs on the business end.

Your friend's ultimate decision on which handgun to get is really not as important as the decision to get one. Pick one, learn to shoot it, keep it handy but safe. She can always change her mind. After all it is a woman's prerogative....


Alan
 
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