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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm dedicated, for what ever perverse reason, to collecting H&R Revolvers, and other H&R firearms. I'd really appreciate hearing comments, stories, observations, facts, questions, BS, etc. concerning H&R revolvers. If you have any old H&Rs and don't know what the hell you have, post a description and maybe we can figure out what it is you have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
MDL,
That's a Model 929. The grips are what they called "STAG" colored. The ejector rod with the steel sleeve around it dates it to right around 1957. The serial number, stamped on the bottom of the butt strap, should start with the letter S, T or U (let me know what it is and we can determine the year). The crane lock up on that one should be a spring loaded plunger that comes down from the top of the frame and there should be a small screw up there. The firing pin should be attached to the nose of the hammer (which is jeweled or machine turned, only done for a few years in the late '50's and early '60's - too costly).
The Model 929 was H&R's FIRST swing out cylinder revolver, along with the Model 930 (nickel plated version), the Model 732 (.32 S&WL) and the nickel plated 733, also in .32S&WL. This model was also the first swing out cylinder revolver made by any of the "Blue Collar" gun manufacturers. It was very well accepted in the market and lasted in production, in two variations (second var. had a transfer bar safety system and frame mounted firing pin), until H&R went out of business in 1986. Model 929 was available in 2 1/2", 4" and 6" barrel lengths
It is a strong gun, with a coil wound main spring, and is capable of handling any .22 lr factory round made today (assuming it is in safe condition to fire.) I hope you find this info interesting and thanks for the opportunity to share some of my info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Walter,
There ya go, you're on your way! Do you have the 732 with the 2 1/2" barrel? Sturdy little gun. 622 is a decent field/utility gun, only draw back is popping out the cylinder to reload. Does the cylinder on your 622 have the manual "ALL IN ONE" ejector system? :-B-:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Walter,
Your 622 has what H&R called "The All In One" ejector system. It was patented and unique to H&R pull-pin revolvers. It was used for about 14 years on their .22 and .32 cal. solid frame revolvers. The Model 733 actually is Nickel plated and should have a polished finish. You may find it to be a lot shinier if you use a bit of Flitz or equivalent metal polish on it. The first one I got, was milky gray looking - it polished to a mirror finish. I carry a 2.5" barrel 732 in the glovebox in the truck, figured I couldn't wreck it by leaving it there all year round. It's loaded with some of the last of the .32 S&W Long MagSafe ammo ever made. The ballistics on these rounds makes them equivalent (at least at the muzzle) to the .380ACP round.
I like H&Rs for the variety available, the "blue collar" feel and the prices.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks Baldy, it is remarkable shape considering the treatment it received. It was hidden away in an attic for MANY years with no protection. There was only a very light bit of surface rust on the lower part of the handle. I removed most of it with a very light buffing with a scotch brite pad. I'll probably keep and let my grandchildren shoot it when they get old enough.[/quote]


I started both of my daughters' shooting with a Model 622. They both loved the feel and became pretty good 25 foot shooters with it. Both graduated to heavier calibers, but still occassionally want to shoot that "OLD 22". Grandson and Granddaughter will learn on that one, too, in about a decade if I make it that long.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Whompuss,
What you actually have there is a Model 939 ULTRA SIDE KICK. It looks like the serial number starts with 'V' which indicates YOM 1959. That date and the push button cylinder release and the key locking main spring make it a late 1st Variation. There were three variations of this particular model. 1st Var. 1958 - 1965: earliest examples had the push button but not the lock - later ones had both features. 2nd Var. 1966 - 1974 had the key lock up until 1972, the push button was dropped around 1965 and never seen again. The 3rd Var. had neither, but was equipped with the "safety bar ignition system".
I have, in my collection s/n U18790 (1958 NIB, early 1st Var.) which has the push button, no lock; s/n U27550 (1958 later 1st Var. - both features) and s/n AN84109 which has the transfer bar ignition/safety system (3rd Var. NIB DOM 1975).
Take a close look at the stamping on the left side of the the barrel and you will see the Model number (939) and the manufacturer's name/address stamp there. The stamping may be deep, some of them are, and the 3 may look like an 8, but if you use a magnifier, you will see that it is really a 3. Hope you find this info usefull.
Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
For those of you who haven't seen these models, here's a couple pics.







Anybody want to see any other models? Just let me know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
32 Mag,

I have the following H&R's

Model 922 SSN AM6446 1974 Third Model, transfer bar safety/ignition system; 100% LNIB - $200 Poor $90

Young America .32 CTG SSN 818687 2nd Model-Medium frame 5 shot, mid to late 1930's, 100% $225 - poor $95%, blue finish add 15%, 4.5" or 6" barrel add 10%
.32 S&W CTGE Top Break Stainless 90 percent cond SSN 211251

.32 S&W CTGE Top Break Blue 95 per cent cond SSN 271417

[What's the DOB and approx worth?
For both of the Top Breaks, need a bit more info - 5 or 6 shot? length of barrel? What is stamped into the top of the barrel rib - complete with patent dates if there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 · (Edited)
The pistols are identical except one is blue and the other is stainless/nickel. These firearms were Nickel plated. Stainless steel was not in common use for any purposes until the mid 1920's and the inherent problems associated with producing firearms from various stainless alloys was not worked out untl the 1970's.

The barrel is 3 inchs and they are five shots. They are both "PREMIER" models, medium frame, they will have the cartridge stamped on the left side of the barrel.

The barrel is stamped:
Harrington & Richardson Arms Co
Worchester Massachusetts USAWith that inscription they are both 2nd model 4th Variation, and with those s/n's they were made between 1916 and 1924, probably closer to 1917-18

There is no patent dates but I bought them both on Auctions Arms and were mailed directly to me so they are pre 1898.
Who ever sold them to you was wrong in stating that they are antiques. The above info is the result of over 14 years of research, both physical and catalogue. Value for either is in the $150 to $250 range depending upon condition and barrel length. The blued versions are worth a 10% premium.
Jim Hauff
H&R Collector
Contributing Editor for H&R Firearms to "The Blue Book of Gun Values" by S. Fjestad
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Actually, I misspoke about what I was looking for, my grandad's gun was a 929 with a flat sided barrel, not octagon as I said before. Thanks for straightening me out on the model numbers Jim.

Mike
Mike,
The "slab side" 929 was offered very early in the production cycle, circa 1957-58.
You're welcome and thanks for thanking.
Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 · (Edited)
Sounds like the nylon "pusher head" at the top of the main spring guide rod has disintegrated - this is a very common problem with H&R revolvers from pre 1986 - the era of your 732. Check by removing grip panels; cock hammer - you will see a hole in the guide rod protruding below the cross strut - put a paper clip end in that hole to capture the spring and guide washer, pull the entire assembly (spring, guide rod and what's left of the pusher) from the gun. Go to www.e-gunparts.com (the Numrich site) - click on "start here", click on "H", click on "Harrington & Richardson", scroll down to "732" and find the part number for the complete "guide rod assembly" with plastic head - order one or two.
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Yep, pockets full of money a C&R license and determination - these Self Loaders start around $300 for a decent (70% finish) example.
H&R also made a .25 ACP.

p.s. Don's may be older, but my barrel is 0.5mm longer and doesn't droop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
Keyser,
The S&W grips will not fit on the small rounded frame 732. There are Pachmayr rubber grips out there that will make the grip larger and also a fairly large MAVERICK combat style wooden grip. I don't think either is being made today, but they do show up on the on-line auction sites on a regular basis. Take a look at www.auctionarms.com and www.gunbroker.com - search using H&R and also Harrington & Richardson - there is some different stuff in each, depending upon how the vendor describes the items. e-Bay may have some of these also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Keyser,
Here's two offerings (note: the wooden oversized grips are called the "MUSTANG" I mistakenly called them the "Maverick";

both are on: www.gunbroker.com

auction # 248668097 for the Pachmayr auction #247933915 for the Mustang.
Go to the home page and type the auction # into the search block.
 
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