National Gun Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Old School.
Joined
·
11,011 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do you guys that reload handle your brass? Do you keep it in lots and only ues it so many times and then pitch it? I shoot all my brass till it splits or I loose it. Needless to say I inspect my brass at several stages real close. :thumbsup:
 

·
Harley Dude
Joined
·
14,651 Posts
I don't keep it separate by mfg but I do date my boxes as I reload them and try to put the number of reloads on the box.

I have found its a waste of time on the low pressure stuff. It just lasts forever. I am still shooting brass I have had since the 1970 and its fine.
I check each case during the reloading process and toss any split or stressed cases.

The high pressure stuff I watch closer since I am worried about a primer pocket blowout or a case separation around the base of the case. So I look at them closely and toss anything that looks remotely weak.

I do not carry reloads for defense so most of my loads are lightweight which helps extend the life of my brass.
 

·
Ruler of Ramnation
Joined
·
1,013 Posts
I used to separate into times fired. Realize I only reload for rifle currently. I know when to pitch 'em.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,424 Posts
I use 'em up. EXCEPT .40 S&W, which I will only reload once. Too squirrelly, too many guns out there with unsupported chambers. We had one KB a few yrs ago, don't ever want to see another.
 

·
Old School.
Joined
·
11,011 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I am with you on the .40's. I got one pistol in .40 and I use factory in it. :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,538 Posts
I only seperate by caliber. I inspect every piece of brass before reloading, and throw bulged or split ones. I will use every one till split, I don't count uses either. I don't shoot competetively, so the need to be real specific on headstamp and batch are not a factor to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
I still use original 45/70 military brass from the 1870's. Once in a while one splits or developes a small hole in the side, but black powder is easy on the brass. Since I use it in the same rifle I never resize. Anything else I load I shoot untill it gives up.
 

·
Red State Rising
Joined
·
2,215 Posts
I'm planning on reloading .40 once I start. I have like 650 spent casings... I guess I'll just have to inspect them well each time I reload. Plus my gun has a supported chamber, so that is good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,633 Posts
I'm at work, so I need to make this short. (did I hear someone say Thank God!????)

Sort by caliber. Pistol brass will last almost forever unless they are fired from unsupported chambers. The brass will work harden and split eventually. There is no way I'll anneal 9mm cases. The bulls eye 45 cases are kept separate, these are all the same weight and capacity of water. Special stuff.

Same for the rifle. Separated by caliber. Checked over for problems. Hunting and special purpose ammo, all same stamp, weight and capacity. I only a couple hundred per rifle of these. Each case was matched to the rifle chamber. I never get those mixed up. The rest get reloaded for a time and then hauled off to the recyclers to get money to buy more.
 

·
Old School.
Joined
·
11,011 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm planning on reloading .40 once I start. I have like 650 spent casings... I guess I'll just have to inspect them well each time I reload. Plus my gun has a supported chamber, so that is good.
Here's a little tool that will help you stay in spec. They are called gauges and you drop the finished cartridge in and if it goes in flush and doesn't stick out the other end you got a shooter. The only problem I have had in the last three years since I started using them is dead primers. I have had only a few of them. .223 rifle, .45acp pistol, .9mm pistol. Dial Calipers. :thumbsup:
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top