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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I know nothing about guns. For some reason I was always interested in guns, but my dad never let me have one. He said "guns are the worst things to ever be invented." I completely disagree. I just like the idea of having protection in my own home and I think it's a great hobby to have. My father threw away my first gun magazine I ever bought so I can learn. He told me, if he ever knew I was researching guns he would kick me out of the house. Well, I'm moving out alone in a month and I think it's time I took up my always desired hobby. So my question is, what is a good starter gun? I live in Illinois, I just applied for my FOID card and am looking to learn about guns and their rules and regulations. I am 180lbs very strong and pretty athletic. I am not worried about having a high recoil power type gun. I do want something that I know it won't miss fire. I like the idea of a cool, efficient gun. I was watching future weapons and he had an automatic rifle that was extremely efficient because of its design. I want a handgun (no rifle for now) I don't know the price ranges of ammo or guns but I do want to spend less than 2,000.00 I really want to keep it as cheap as possible for now. My ideal price for gun spending would be around $500.00 Like I said though I have no idea what a gun costs. Or where to even look for them.
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
good for you for staying true to your intrests and acting on your on values and not buying into the opinion of others. as far as handguns go the first thing is to take a training course. im sure there are many in your area to choose from.they will teach you all the safety issues that are paramount to gun ownership. i mean you took courses to learn to drive a car and guns can be more deadly than cars in untrained hands. after training and shooting a few different weapons your choices in weapons should be narrowed down a bit.at least in caliber. then you will be able to choose the right handgun for you.if the training requires that you alresdy have a handgun try to find a gun range where you can rent different gun/calibers and try a few different ones to see what you like and is easiest for you to use.but training should definately be first.good luck and keep us posted on the "quest". i'm excited for you.
 

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Premium Member
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15,424 Posts
Welcome to the forum, Mr. resevil83, glad you stopped by.

TKE is giving good advice, get all the training you can. Another thing you may want to check into is if there are any gun clubs in your area. Many times you can hang out with gun people and learn a bunch. Also, most gun people are just plain good folks and love to share their interest in firearms. I just had a young guy and his girlfriend spend about 2 1/2 hrs over at the house/shop, the wk before last. They're 21 and 23 and just wanted to learn. We sat around and talked, they learned about different guns as well as reloading (which the girl hadn't ever heard of and the guy had never done) and had a good time. I'll take them out to the range when we can get our schedules together.

So look around the forum, ask questions and have fun. No one here's going to discourage you from learning and getting into this addiction -- 'scuze me -- hobby!

KYPD,

~Rick
a/k/a "The Gunrunner"
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies guys! I am going to call a place on Tuesday for course information. It's only about a half hour from my house. I'll keep you up to date! Any suggested magazines to pick up?
 

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Pro Gun Advocate
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10,940 Posts
Welcome to the club, sir.

I fight this issue myself within my own family--one of my brothers and my two sisters just don't get it and never will. I'm the black sheep gun nut.

Here are some places for you to check out:

Ar15 Illinois Hometown page
Illinois Carry
Illinois RKBA Grassroots Organization

Regarding a first gun to buy, many of us start out with .22s. They are inexpensive guns and are cheap to shoot.

They are also great for learning basic skills, since there is no recoil anticipation to interfere with your technique. You'll then come in contact with others who can help guide you to your next step.

Good luck, and post often to let us know how you're getting along and to share what you've learned.

Lots of great folks here who will enjoy helping you in any way we can.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I agree with the suggested first gun of a .22. If you want something for self-defense though, I would say a good .357 Magnum revolver makes a great first handgun. With this one gun, you can shoot inexpensive (well, no centerfire ammo is really inexpensive anymore) .38 Special ammo. Start out with target .38 loads and work yourself up to the full house .357s. You just need to remember to clean your cylinders after firing .38 Special ammo, otherwise the .357s may not want to fully seat. The .357 is a very versatile handgun, being suitable for everything from target shooting to self defense to even deer hunting with the proper bullets.
 

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2,921 Posts
Sounds like the guys that responded ahead of me gave you good advice. I was also the only one in my family that took an interest in guns, and I came from a big family. I started with long guns at 18 and then moved on to handuns at 21 as the law permitted, and 32 years later it's still my favorite thing.
I took the hunter safety course right away when I turned 18 and that course instilled excellent safety principals that are still ingrained in me today. Gun clubs are a great idea. Some of us veteran gun guys like to bicker among ourselves about the fine details of guns and shooting, but I think that all of us like to help each other out especially a new guy like yourself. You should also join the NRA. They have a great organization that will address your questions and take you under their wings. The membership is well worth the cost and you will be also joining the ranks in the political/legal battles that are constantly raging. We need all the help we can get. Just put NRA into your search bar and it will come up. They also have a great magazine called the American Rifleman that comes with your NRA subscription. I also like Guns and Ammo, and Shooting Times magazines that can also be easily located on the computer.
A far as good starter gun it depends on what you want to do. You can't go wrong with a .22 except that it's not that good for self/home defense. If you want to get something that also covers home/self defense then you gotta start thinking about center fire calibers of .38 and above. The 357/38 is a good choice for beginers because of its diversity. My first handgun was a S&W Model 19, and that turned out to be a great choice for me.
Good luck and feel free to keep the questions coming.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My recommendation for a good quality starter gun for home defense and range work would be a Ruger GP100, 4" barrel, chambered for the .357 Magnum cartridge. You can shoot full loads in this beast forever without the weapon even thinking about a failing. You can economize with .38 Specials for range work - BUT, as said previously, just clean the gun after each use; especially the cylinder. If you choose to reload, the sky is the limit. This is one "tank" of a handgun; reliable, accurate and a decent resale value to boot. You can pick one up for under $500.00. Win/win, IMO.
 
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