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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I do quite a bit of fishing and from time to time I've been known to end up wet. Luckily never carrying a gun. What kind of trouble is a submerged gun going to be to clean/repair?
 

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Premium Member
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15,424 Posts
One of several reasons I like polymer-framed pistols. I wouldn't go out of my way to dunk it, but it's easily dried and lubed if it were to happen. As much as I love wheelguns, it's a PITA with a revolver.
 
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had an m&p on my hip on a canoe trip last wked.stepson dumped the boat. gun shot fine after a quick cleaning.thank goodness for thumb straps!
 

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Old School.
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11,011 Posts
If you have air compressor. Blow it out real good and lay in the sun for a few hours. Lube and oil it real good and you should be good to go. Just don't put it off for a week or two. You need to do it as soon as you get to camp or back home. :)
 

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Right Wing Zealot
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Baldy said:
If you have air compressor. Blow it out real good and lay in the sun for a few hours. Lube and oil it real good and you should be good to go. Just don't put it off for a week or two. You need to do it as soon as you get to camp or back home. :)
Ditto. Do you have a handgun that wouldn't break your heart if you lost it in the water, but is still a decent shooter? I used to keep a Glock on my jetski for just that reason.
 

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I had an alternator go out in a vehicle in the wrong part of town. We changed it out in the rain, while I was carrying my Sig 226. I took it home, stripped it down (including taking the grips off) and put it in a WARM NOT HOT oven.

Dried it out, relubed it, zero rust.
 
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Well I think whatever the gun is, get it out as fast as possible for one, especially if its a rifle and the stock was submerged. So disassembling it and letting it dry out for a bit probably won't yield any damages. Of course a good cleaning and re-lubing, whatever it is shouldn't effect it shooting unless it was submerged and left there for a while. But if its just dropped and retrieved quickly, cleaned, all should be good I would think.

I was watching Guns and Ammo Mag TV, they torture tested I am pretty sure it was a Springfield Armory 1911 Mil-Spec they shot underwater in a pool. It fired underwater, but I don't remember if it cycled another round or not. But it did create a bulge in the barrel from the pressures of the water in the barrel.

But if you go to http://www.gunsandammomag.com/ and on the top banners there is one called "video" click that then click the torture tests tab and you can see some of the torture testing they have done on various guns. I watched one where they submerged a NIB Kimber full size 1911 in a high concentration of salt water for 3 days, and let it sit out for 10 hrs then shot it. I have also seen one a while back, which is one of the vids to watch, a S&W 1911 I think they put in a deep fryer.
 

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Drunk Supernova
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6,002 Posts
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. If you know that you are going to be in an environment where it is likely to get wet, simply add a bit more lube to the metal parts, it makes it much easier to clean at the end of the day.

If a firearm can not handle getting wet, then it is not a firearm that I would be willing to carry.
 
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+1 CDP I agree. I have a law enforcement friend, who has been with the Sheriff's dept. for ages, and he does a boat patrol. He has a nice Colt 1911 Commander style gun he likes to carry on his normal duty days. But when he gets in a boat, he says, "I don't want to drop my good gun in the water so I'll strap on this POS Glock." If he should ever happen somehow to drop his gun in the water, he would probably have to call out the divers to get it lol. I think his dept. issues him Glocks, but they have the option of buying their own for duty. I can't attest to the Glock myself, having never shot one. But he doesn't not like them, just kinda thinks they are toyish because of their plastic properties.

But I wouldn't carry a pistol if it couldn't stand up to the rigors of carry in any environment. I like to carry a sidearm when I hunt on the west side of this state and well, as WA residents well know, the rain can really come whenever/wherever/whyever. And especially during the hunting seasons, it does rain. So its going to get a little wet, have bushes and dust and stuff get on it etc.....forging through the bush here in the NW. I carry my Springfield Armory 1911 Mil-Spec .45 pistol when I am hunting here on the west side.
 

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Harley Dude
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Years ago, pistols/revolvers had lanyards attached to the butt of the gun and the other end attached to ones belt. If the gun was dropped all was not lost.

If you are in a boat the attached lanyard seems like a good idea. Beats having to hire a dive team to retrieve your firearm. ;) ;)
 

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Drunk Supernova
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Iron_Colonel said:
+1 CDP I agree. I have a law enforcement friend, who has been with the Sheriff's dept. for ages, and he does a boat patrol. He has a nice Colt 1911 Commander style gun he likes to carry on his normal duty days. But when he gets in a boat, he says, "I don't want to drop my good gun in the water so I'll strap on this POS Glock." If he should ever happen somehow to drop his gun in the water, he would probably have to call out the divers to get it lol. I think his dept. issues him Glocks, but they have the option of buying their own for duty. I can't attest to the Glock myself, having never shot one. But he doesn't not like them, just kinda thinks they are toyish because of their plastic properties.

But I wouldn't carry a pistol if it couldn't stand up to the rigors of carry in any environment. I like to carry a sidearm when I hunt on the west side of this state and well, as WA residents well know, the rain can really come whenever/wherever/whyever. And especially during the hunting seasons, it does rain. So its going to get a little wet, have bushes and dust and stuff get on it etc.....forging through the bush here in the NW. I carry my Springfield Armory 1911 Mil-Spec .45 pistol when I am hunting here on the west side.
While the Glock does retain reliability, It just does not shoot well for me (as I explained in my shooting report), the 36 does well because of the angle, but the rest of them, unless you are talking about the SF Glocks just do not point right.

I really do not give two poos and a wet fart less what the piece is made of, so long as it shoots well, fits me well, and is reliable.

If I am worried about dropping a pistol in a lake or river then I do not deserve to carry.

As Sig said, there are lanyards available. Not only do they keep you from dropping your pistol in a lake, but they also aid in weapons retention. It is kind of hard for a bad guy to shoot you with your own gun when you are yanking on the lanyard!
 

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Harley Dude
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CDP Quote: While the Glock does retain reliability, It just does not shoot well for me (as I explained in my shooting report), the 36 does well because of the angle, but the rest of them, unless you are talking about the SF Glocks just do not point right

I have a couple of them too and have grown fond of them like an old VW beetle! But I can't shoot them worth a crap, never could and thats a bit of a disappointment.

They are fine for defensive use. My bullets are all in the Torso, but just not the nice tight groups that my Kimber delivers.
 

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Drunk Supernova
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sig232 said:
CDP Quote: While the Glock does retain reliability, It just does not shoot well for me (as I explained in my shooting report), the 36 does well because of the angle, but the rest of them, unless you are talking about the SF Glocks just do not point right

I have a couple of them too and have grown fond of them like an old VW beetle! But I can't shoot them worth a crap, never could and thats a bit of a disappointment.

They are fine for defensive use. My bullets are all in the Torso, but just not the nice tight groups that my Kimber delivers.
First shot from the holster for me was always two or three inches high, successive shots were generally closer to my aiming point because of adjusting. They drive pretty well, but you are right, not near as good as my Kimber (IMHO).
 
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If you know ahead of time that it's going to be wet a complete teardown and a good coat of paste car wax inside and out will do wonders for a 1911. Just buff the excess real good and don't leave any buildup.
 
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I was watching that Show on the discovery channel myth busters. They shot afew guns underwater, 9mm , revolver, rifle, and a shot gun. All the guns fired but the pressure from the shot gun it exploded. The shell did not eject b/c of the lack of air. The bullet only went a few feet but not likely lethal. I'm pretty sure they cleaned the guns real good after that.
 
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I had an auto on my hip while snowshoeing and it got caked with snow, which was also up the barrel, the gun is fine and fires fine, but days afterwards, (after cleaning, of course), the ammunition, which always fires fine for me, would fire, but the gun would not reload correctly with that ammunition that got wet.
 

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Chicago Pro-Gun Activist
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I cannot count the number of times my service weapons got throughly soaked. Always made sure that they were oiled to protect them and never had a problem. Besides, the one person you do not want to anger is your Gunnery Sergeant and rust or non-functioning weapons will definitely provide him with an excuse to have a "bad day" which quickly becomes your "very bad day!"
 

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A rusty gun is not necessarily an unsafe one. I have repaired several old rusty "barn finds" for folks. If you go fishing and pull up a gun, there are plenty of ways to fix it. Remember, steel actually rusts slower in water. Rust need oxygen, water although having oxygen in it, will actually protect the steel. That is why you see pictures or like me scubaed down to a wreck will be surprised at how little rust there is. I dove to the bottom of a open pit mine site that filled with water in Upstate NY where a 1890's train locomotive was left on the bottom. It had a heavy coating of surface rust, but still solid. And the colder the water, the slower the rusting process. Steel rusts faster in the air because of the high concentration of O2. Salt air is actually slightly corrosive that is why it attacks metal so fast.

Now if you sidearm takes a bath, just pull it out and detail strip it. Dry everything and oil. That is it, you are done. Do not put it in the oven to dry it. You will create steam and that make the oxygen more active and will actually promote rust. If you are out in the field and have to do some guerrilla gunsmithing, soak it down well with a water displacing oil, can you say WD40? The oil is designed to push water out of where ever it hits. That is the reason I use it as the first oil bath after parking a gun. It literally pulls out the water in the park pores, then it is followed by a sealing oil. I keep a big spray can of it in my fishing gear, it really works.
 

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Harley Dude
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14,651 Posts
A rusty gun is not necessarily an unsafe one. I have repaired several old rusty "barn finds" for folks. If you go fishing and pull up a gun, there are plenty of ways to fix it. Remember, steel actually rusts slower in water. Rust need oxygen, water although having oxygen in it, will actually protect the steel. That is why you see pictures or like me scubaed down to a wreck will be surprised at how little rust there is. I dove to the bottom of a open pit mine site that filled with water in Upstate NY where a 1890's train locomotive was left on the bottom. It had a heavy coating of surface rust, but still solid. And the colder the water, the slower the rusting process. Steel rusts faster in the air because of the high concentration of O2. Salt air is actually slightly corrosive that is why it attacks metal so fast.

Now if you sidearm takes a bath, just pull it out and detail strip it. Dry everything and oil. That is it, you are done. Do not put it in the oven to dry it. You will create steam and that make the oxygen more active and will actually promote rust. If you are out in the field and have to do some guerrilla gunsmithing, soak it down well with a water displacing oil, can you say WD40? The oil is designed to push water out of where ever it hits. That is the reason I use it as the first oil bath after parking a gun. It literally pulls out the water in the park pores, then it is followed by a sealing oil. I keep a big spray can of it in my fishing gear, it really works.

Excellent Post! A good summary of how to protect you gun following its getting a bath.
 
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