National Gun Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello there,
I have some issues with my ruger gp 100:
I have a very light trigger pull (single&double action) with 3 replacement springs.
But when I am shooting, after 10 single action shots, the trigger pull spikes beyond infinity.

This happened before i installed the springs too. I hoped to solve this problem
It feels like i arrived at the trigger stop and still need a little bit of way.... i opend the gun, checked for dirt etc, reinstalled everything and got my light pull back. BUT after some shots it comes again. I tried out to dry fire 20 times double action and the problem was gone.

To conclude: after some shots, something jams by recoil or heat and my trigger pull is close to impossible (beyond every cheap gun you could imagine)
After cooling down/opening/double action dryfire, problem is solved for another few rounds.

Do you ever had a problem like this?
Thanks fo your help guys
Pascal
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,167 Posts
Let your trigger return "fully-to-reset" when shooting. Otherwise the action will "cramp or stack" with the internal parts loading. That's my "guess". The revolver doing what you describe in single-action operation seems very odd. Unless the trigger is being held from completing "reset".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,791 Posts
STEVEJET::::::Let your trigger return "fully-to-reset" when shooting. Otherwise the action will "cramp or stack" with the internal parts loading. That's my "guess". The revolver doing what you describe in single-action operation seems very odd. Unless the trigger is being held from completing "reset". Was my thoughts also missing the reset??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,167 Posts
Revolver Knowledge: Resetting the double-action trigger

Posted by: Grant Cunningham



A revolver shooting issue that comes up frequently is resetting the double-action trigger (or, more correctly, allowing the trigger to reset.)

This problem seems to be more common among those who are accustomed to shooting autoloading pistols, as they tend to develop habits that shooters of lesser experience do not. (I’m not saying the problem is exclusive to that group, mind you, but they exhibit it to a much greater degree than their less-experienced counterparts.) I also see it in supposedly experienced and knowledgeable instructors!

Enter the wheelgun

The person who’s used to shooting an autoloading pistol and feeling for that reset often has trouble with the very different revolver trigger. This is because most revolvers have what I’ve come to call “phantom reset points”: points in the trigger return stroke where the shooter feels telltale clicks that serve as a cue to pull the trigger again.

The trouble is that the revolver trigger isn’t yet reset, and pulling the trigger again on cue either does nothing — or, in the worst case, actually locks the trigger’s movement!

Where these reset points are depends on the make of the revolver and, sometimes, even the specific model. In general, though, Ruger revolvers have the most distinctive false resets; they’re also the ones that consistently lock the trigger when the shooter tries to fire another round after encountering the false reset. (Fixing that lock-up is a simple matter of relaxing the trigger finger and allowing the trigger to fully reset before trying to fire another shot.)

On any revolver, the only reliable reset point is at the forward-most point of trigger travel. Occasionally you may find an individual gun which resets just short of that, but in general the only real reset is when the trigger has stopped moving — and it’s the only proper way to train your trigger finger.

The revolver trigger reset

So, how do you reset the revolver trigger properly? By not trying to reset it!

I teach my students to reset the trigger by allowing their finger to “bounce” off the trigger ever so slightly. What I mean by this is allowing the trigger to reset all the way forward, far enough that as the finger continues moving, the now-stationary trigger allows the compressed flesh of the finger’s pad to expand nearly back to normal. Once that “re-inflation” has been felt, another shot can be initiated.

This technique usually eliminates the problem of the false reset. The most important thing is to complete ignore any tactile sensation which suggests the trigger has reset before that point.

Note that the trigger finger is not necessarily coming completely off the trigger. I like to maintain just enough contact so that my trigger finger is at the same place on the face of the trigger. Allowing the pad to re-inflate suffices to do that and still allows a full trigger reset. If the finger does come off the trigger face just a little, I don’t worry about it as long as the shooter demonstrates good control.

This is sometimes derided as “slapping the trigger” by many shooters. But, as Rob Leatham is fond of showing, trigger slap isn’t a problem if the gun is being grasped correctly in the first place.

Do the bounce

If the revolver trigger has not reached its forward stopping point, it has not reset properly. The only way to allow it to do so is to give it enough room under the trigger finger to move all the way forward. The only way I’ve found to ingrain the habit in myself and in my students is to teach the “trigger finger bounce”.

Revolvers aren’t autoloaders. If you try to shoot them as though they are, you’re not going to have a good time. Learn how and why the revolver trigger resets as it does, and you’ll find it easier and more rewarding to shoot!

— Grant Cunningham

https://www.grantcunningham.com/2018/11/revolver-knowledge-resetting-the-double-action-trigger/




 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys! I'll check that on the range tomorrow. But i don't think thats the reason, because
1. i dont have a thight grip so my trigger fknger usually boumces of the trigger anyway,
2. The problem occours only after a few shots
But anyway ill give it a try.
Thanks guys
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Also try to diagnose when it happens. For instance, when it happens, mark that cylinder or see if it only after fast consecutive shots or slow decisive shots.
When it does happen if you take your finger off and pull the trigger forward does it now reset back to normal?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
...
On any revolver, the only reliable reset point is at the forward-most point of trigger travel. Occasionally you may find an individual gun which resets just short of that, but in general the only real reset is when the trigger has stopped moving — and it’s the only proper way to train your trigger finger.
...
I agree with this totally; and as a revolver guy, that seemed to be the most logical thing to do.


I think I do it about like that every time. Start at 1:11
.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Also try to diagnose when it happens. For instance, when it happens, mark that cylinder or see if it only after fast consecutive shots or slow decisive shots.
When it does happen if you take your finger off and pull the trigger forward does it now reset back to normal?
It could be as simple as crud built up under the ejector star making case heads stand too proud and bind the cylinder. Ok said he dry fired it without a problem with the gun unloaded. Just a guess.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top