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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What? How did I miss this thread :eek: .
Squirrel was a staple in our home growing up.
The afore posted squirrel stew receipe works for any squirrel; to fry them you need young tender ones. I shot them with a .22 with 4x scope. That way you could preview the squirrel. If it was a sow with visible teats, pass on. If it was a beau with visible testicles, pass on again. You want a young female who's never given birth or a neutered male. They don't teach this in Guns & Ammo but the old beau neuters the young males shortly after birth, using his teeth to do the deed, therefore eleminating competition.
Now that we have our young and tender victim, make a gash just under the skin at the middle of the back and going around the circumference. then take the index fnd middle finger of each hand and insert under the slit in the back. Pull really hard and the skin goes over the fron legs and head, rear legs and tail. A sharp knife cuts away the head, legs and tail. You now have a skinned squirrel.
Make an incision just under the skin starting at the base of the neck and continuing to the genital area, careful not to puncture the bladder. Opening the body cavity will allow you to remove the vicera including the bladder intact keeping the meat clean. Rinse out the cavity and put the squirrel (s) in a pan and cover with milk, soak for 2 hours. The milk removes the "wild" and tenderizes the meat. You can fry the animal (s) whole, using spices to your liking and coating with flour. A deep cast iron skillet works best. Use about 2" of cooking oil and fry on each side about 8-10 min, turning once. Remove the done squirrel to a plate, pour off all of the grease except enough to coat the bottom of the skillet, being careful to retain the brown crumbs. This is your gravey stock. Add flour and water (or milk if you like milk gravey) and whisk until you have a thick pan of gravey.
At this point you can serve the squirrel bare and allow the lucky eater to pour the gravey over or place the cooked squirrels back in the gravey and simmer awhile to super tenderize. Serve with grits, rice or mashed taters.
Did I mention? Always take the animal with a head shot- don't mess up the meat!
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I usually soak them in salt water with a tablespoon of vinegar to remove the wild taste (I'm not a big milk drinker). I agree the best squirrels are one year old or less. If ya see a big male with some sizable luggage hanging, your better off just to let him go by. He won't be any good to eat no matter how much you soak him.

Those big males do look good mounted on a piece of driftwood, if you know a good taxidermist.
 
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