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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So NGF... which do you prefer in your pistols?

Steel or Polymer?

Personally I prefer steel. I've never had a bad experience with polymer pistols, nor have I ever heard of anything bad happening to them. I just think they look tawdry personally. They don't look like real guns. And yes I know that looks matter very little when it comes to performance... but I don't care. I have to like the way a gun looks before I buy it... and I just don't like how polymer looks.
 

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It doesn't matter to me, I'll own anything that is dependable. It's not the plastic that makes the gun and if there is ever a person on the other end of it, he isn't much going to care either.
 

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So NGF... which do you prefer in your pistols?

Steel or Polymer?

Personally I prefer steel. I've never had a bad experience with polymer pistols, nor have I ever heard of anything bad happening to them. I just think they look tawdry personally. They don't look like real guns. And yes I know that looks matter very little when it comes to performance... but I don't care. I have to like the way a gun looks before I buy it... and I just don't like how polymer looks.
This is an old issue but that's okay. I happen to agree with you, but I also realize that both spcecies are fine depending on your preference. You can add to your argument that the reduction in weight of polymere is insignificant, and the undesireable gain in recoil is siginificant. I don't think we can say that the Glocks and its competitors are not good because they obviously are, but it's kind of like telling somebody that a Subaru can do everything that an F150 or a Silverado can do. Maybe it can is someways but you won't catch me in a Subaru an time soon. That 's my analogy and opinion.
 

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What is it a Glock can't do that any other steel gun can?
 

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Is this a scientific investigation or personal observation? I personally don't know, but since I have no like calibers in steel and plastic, I have to believe only what I have done. I have no problem with my plastic guns in controlling recoil, so if all steel is better, I would be awsome! Unfortunately we have no where to rent guns within 120 miles from here, I'll have to take your word for it.
 

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Is this a scientific investigation or personal observation? I personally don't know, but since I have no like calibers in steel and plastic, I have to believe only what I have done. I have no problem with my plastic guns in controlling recoil, so if all steel is better, I would be awsome! Unfortunately we have no where to rent guns within 120 miles from here, I'll have to take your word for it.
Here's an actual range report that I experienced: Myself and two friends fired my 40 cal Beretta 96; recoil and accuracy were fine with everyone. Glock 40 cal: gun was jumpy with obviously more recoil and accuracy was down among all three of us. Reliability was equal with both guns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well what I would like to know is if there really is so little difference between plastic and steel (and from all my research and experience, there isn't) then why are plastic gun owners so vehement about defending their decision? Because there is so little difference in functionality, to me, it all comes down to aesthetics.

Oh and I'm sure steel is a little bit better for pistol whipping lol
 

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Well what I would like to know is if there really is so little difference between plastic and steel (and from all my research and experience, there isn't) then why are plastic gun owners so vehement about defending their decision? Because there is so little difference in functionality, to me, it all comes down to aesthetics.

Oh and I'm sure steel is a little bit better for pistol whipping lol
Did you recall the scene in "Saving Private Ryan" when the 45/1911 was empty and the Sargeant used it as a throwing weapon? I'd much rather have 1911 to slap or throw at my adversary than a Glock. I also wonder if Glocks will hold up to extreme heat as well as all steel guns.
 

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Did you recall the scene in "Saving Private Ryan" when the 45/1911 was empty and the Sargeant used it as a throwing weapon? I'd much rather have 1911 to slap or throw at my adversary than a Glock. I also wonder if Glocks will hold up to extreme heat as well as all steel guns.
What heat are you talking about? Nobody I know puts their gun in an oven just for kicks. Plastic guns will stand up to every bit of abuse as a steel one, the difference is the plastic will not look as beat up. The only difference is that some people don't like plastic, it is new technology. Just like the first cars, horses were better and more reliable. Plastic is cheaper to make and buy, steel has the looks and feel of real iron. Both do the job of sending projectiles down range. The melting point of nylon 6 that is what the glock frame is made of is 428*.
 

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What heat are you talking about? Nobody I know puts their gun in an oven just for kicks. Plastic guns will stand up to every bit of abuse as a steel one, the difference is the plastic will not look as beat up. The only difference is that some people don't like plastic, it is new technology. Just like the first cars, horses were better and more reliable. Plastic is cheaper to make and buy, steel has the looks and feel of real iron. Both do the job of sending projectiles down range. The melting point of nylon 6 that is what the glock frame is made of is 428*.
Not that you would be carrying in or around that kind of heat, but concern about durability from a fire or extreme heat while in storage. If I had a house fire, I'd feel better about the steel guns that the polymer ones. Guns are an investment. Plastic is historically a cheap material, while most metals on the other hand have greater values. I'd rather have better materials for my investments. Plastic is plastic and steel is steel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What heat are you talking about? Nobody I know puts their gun in an oven just for kicks. Plastic guns will stand up to every bit of abuse as a steel one, the difference is the plastic will not look as beat up. The only difference is that some people don't like plastic, it is new technology. Just like the first cars, horses were better and more reliable. Plastic is cheaper to make and buy, steel has the looks and feel of real iron. Both do the job of sending projectiles down range. The melting point of nylon 6 that is what the glock frame is made of is 428*.
428*?! THAT'S IT?! Wow... so less than the average camp fire huh? I'm glad the melting point of (most) steel is 1370*. Now granted I realize no polymer frame gun could probably even get that hot (428*) but still I'm sure the constant heating up and cooling down lifestyle of pistols might warp that, ever so slightly, after a few years or so... wouldn't you think? I'm also sure that gun makers have also thought of this and taken steps to correct it or prevent it or whatever... maybe it has something to do with the whole "car/horse" mentality you mentioned... but that just doesn't sound like something I would like to take a chance on.

And I disagree with the plastic not looking as beat up. I think it shows its age a lot worse than steel. Though fixing gouges and scratches in a plastic frame has to be a lot cheaper than steel
 

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I've never seen a piece of plastic that didn't screw up with time. Shrink, crack, twist and so on. I know the new stuff is supposed to be stable and all but it doesn't really have a track record long enough to tell one way or the other....does it?
 

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I have seen Glocks from the 80's still shoot as if they were new with no cracks, no old white haze you see in fatigued plastics, and still holding their lines. Remeber these "plastic" frames are not just plastic. Yes they will melt if put to a blow torch, or deform and become soft and start to melt if left in an oven at 450 degrees for 5 hours (exaggerated sarcasim lol). I do like steel frames a lot but its hard to not to like the rigidity and the light weight of a "plastic" frame.
 

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Guess I have a bunch of junk guns, I'll just have them all destroyed next time there is a turn in for a few bucks worth of groceries.:thumbsup:
 

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There are glocks that have over 100000 rounds through them and are still going strong. I have seen 1911's that have been through hell and back rattle like a baby toy and still shoot. I dont care what the gun is made out of as long as it is reliable. After all I don't believe I will ever live long enough or shoot enough to wear either one out and as long as you stick to good manufacturers both types will be more accurate then I am capable of shooting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
There are glocks that have over 100000 rounds through them and are still going strong. I have seen 1911's that have been through hell and back rattle like a baby toy and still shoot. I dont care what the gun is made out of as long as it is reliable. After all I don't believe I will ever live long enough or shoot enough to wear either one out and as long as you stick to good manufacturers both types will be more accurate then I am capable of shooting.
But which do you prefer though? Even if you trust both types fully with your life (though I prefer steel I have enough experience with polymer to be confident with them) there has to be one that you prefer... even if it is because of something that matters as little as how it looks.
 
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