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Ancient Gaseous Emanation
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Thomas Lifson
December 21, 2019


A now-former FBI employee is going to jail for illegally accessing private emails and attempting to expose them to his employer and the media. It's not James Comey, Andrew McCabe, Peter Strzok, or Lisa Page, but at least it's a start.

It's not clear if this was a personal freelance effort or if more senior levels were involved, but if the latter is the case, there is no evidence leading to further prosecutions of the higher-ups. Either that, or maybe the perp is getting a light sentence in return for turning in the higher-ups. A guy can hope….

Fox News reports:

A former FBI analyst was sentenced to seven days in jail Friday after admitting he illegally accessed an email address belonging to a right-wing Washington lobbyist as part of his efforts to expose an alleged smear campaign against Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

The former FBI analyst — Mark Tolson, 60, — pleaded guilty in a federal court in Alexandria, Va., in September to a misdemeanor charge of computer fraud and abuse, according to Politico.

Tolson said, with help from his wife Sarah Gilbert Fox, he accessed an email account belonging to GOP lobbyist Jack Burkman, photographed "emails of interest," and tried to hand them over both to the FBI and the press, The Washington Post reported. Fox had worked for Burkman from October 2017 to summer 2018 and had his email password, authorities said. She was not charged.​




https://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2019/12/first_fbi_employee_sentenced_to_jail_in_antitrump_scandals.html
 
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Only 7 days in jail! What kind of sentence is that! This is a completed joke!
 

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Only 7 days in jail! What kind of sentence is that! This is a completed joke!


I think that's about the same sentence given out to most inner city gang members caught with an illegal handgun.
 
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The real culprits will never see the inside of a courtroom involved or associated with our apparent crooked legal system.
 

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The real culprits will never see the inside of a courtroom involved or associated with our apparent crooked legal system.
Unfortunately, this is the true, Our society is slowing being converted from a nation of laws, where no one is above the law, to a Socialist dictatorship were laws only applies to the masses. The "elite" are all above the laws THEY make.
 

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One small step for the screwed over public trust, one giant leap for the corrupt revolving doors of Washington D.C. two-tiered justice.

This is going to have a very, very negative effect on Federal Jurisprudence. There was a time people feared Federal Raps, and the
brutal and long sentences meted out for even minor Federal infractions, but
with Swamp Lawless getting away with a slap on the wrist, for HIgh Treason Against the POTUS, why should they feel constrained, now ?
 

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That's what happens to Kalifornia state employees and some county politicians - those elected to be office holders - whose "pay" remains unaffected by "where they are" on pay-day. Our Orange County Sheriff was sentenced to something like 7 years in jail for Federal Law infractions. He spent 4 or 5 years in jail while his wife continued to receive his $203,000 annual salary! If you are in jail, does your employer still pay you?

"Loophole Allows Officials Convicted of Corruption to Keep Pensions"

When former Vernon city administrator Bruce Malkenhorst was convicted of misappropriating public funds last week, the gap between two sets of numbers immediately jumped out.

The $100,000 in fines and restitution that Malkenhorst was ordered to pay for his crime. And the $500,000 a year state pension that he got after retiring five years ago from the industrial city.

The 76-year-old former public official had one thing going for him: He wasn’t elected to his position. Had Malkenhorst been, it’s very likely that his state pension would have disappeared.

“The law states that pensions are revoked if an elected official is convicted of a felony, but not in the case of an employee,” said Brad Pacheco, a spokesman for CalPERS. Malkenhorst “would continue to receive his pension according to the law.”

The issue of the public pensions of those convicted or charged of felonies came to the head after a massive salary scandal broke out last summer in the city of Bell, one of Vernon’s neighbors in Southeast Los Angeles County. The Times revealed that city administrator Robert Rizzo made about $800,000 a year, and that his total compensation swelled to about $1.5 million with other benefits.

As a result, state Sen. Tony Strickland (R-Moorpark) proposed a bill that would strip the pension benefits of a public official if they are convicted of misusing public funds. The bill, SB115, died in a state Senate committee this month, with two Republicans voting for it and three Democrats against.

The bill drew the opposition of various employee groups, including the AFL-CIO, the California Professional Firefighters and the California State Employees Assn. They and the lawmakers who voted against the bill argued that it discriminated against public employees relative to private employees and said such a law would really harm “innocent spouse and family of the convicted officer who will lose their financial security.” ?????????????

Strickland said he was “shocked” that the bill was killed.

“State law affects judges and elected officials, but not people like Rizzo,” he said. “The argument about the family is a weak argument that can apply to any person convicted of a crime. Families are always affected when you talk about criminals.”

When Malkenhorst stepped down in 2005 amid a criminal investigation by county prosecutors, Malkenhorst was making about $912,000. Now he collects the highest public pension in California: $509,664.

Rizzo was on schedule to collect $600,000 through CalPERS, though a “supplemental pension” he designed for himself and other Bell officials could have pushed his pension to $1 million.

Rizzo’s potential pension in particular fed into the heated issue of public employee questions, and concerns that the rising costs of them as well as retiree healthcare could overwhelm the ability of taxpayers to fund many basic health, welfare and public safety services.

But unlike Malkenhorst, Rizzo's pension is threatened by allegations that he got his high salary fraudulently.

https://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2011/05/loophole-allows-officials-convicted-of-public-corruption-to-keep-hefty-pensions.html


With laws like these and crony's in high places, why worry?
 
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