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How will we know we've shot corrosive ammo? Is it labelled on the box, or is there no way to know before shooting?
Hi there;

The stuff in corrosive ammo is basically a mineral salt (potassium chloride)(or Barium Nitrate) used to preserve the primers for long term reliable ignition. It also has the effect (its salt) of drawing in moisture from the air. This is why people in humid areas need to be more wary with corrosive ammo than people in dry, arid climates.


But yes, it can cause the bore to rust, and if the rust isn't removed, it will pit. Just clean your barrel with good solvent like Hoppe's.

The labels on the ammo boxes lie sometimes (China ammo, Russian ammo and former Eastbloc ammo)

Here is a test to check the ammo labels:


Have a good cigar and regards
ARMARIN
 

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Ancient Gaseous Emanation
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Ahh, the corrosive primers/ammo bugaboo.

Here's the solution. Clean your rifle's bore, chamber and bolt face after every shooting session. (You should be doing this anyway.) Most any solvent will work quite well... even water works for flushing corrosive salts.
 

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Clean your gun barrel from the chamber to the muzzle.

If you don't have an opening for a cleaning rod, you can tie

cleaning patches to thin nylon cord or braided line. Soak the patches with your

favorite solvents and oils, running dry patches in between.
 

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Hammer Fired

In the world of modern firearms which use centerfire cartridges, there are two major types of mechanisms used to trigger the cartridge primer. One uses a hammer and another uses a striker. Therefore, mechanisms that use a hammer are called hammer-fired and the ones that use a striker are called striker fired. As you can guess, each mechanism has its own group of supporters.

searanimHR.gif


In a hammer fired mechanism, the hammer is a heavy piece that is allowed to rotate about a pivot point. When the hammer is cocked, it compresses a spring. When the trigger is released, the spring pushes the hammer and forces it to rotate forward. The end of the hammer strikes the back end of a firing pin, which is a thin steel pin with a hardened tip. The front end of the firing pin strikes the primer of the cartridge, thereby detonating it. The image below shows how this works.

In some revolvers, the firing pin is attached to the hammer directly.

Revolverfiringpin.jpg

Firing pin attached to the hammer of a Smith & Wesson Model 13 revolver.
Image licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The main thing that we conclude after looking at all the images above is that a hammer-fired weapon is a rotating type mechanism.

hammer2.gif

(Inspired by Blog.nl )

Have a good cigar and regards
ARMARIN
 

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Striker Fired

In the world of modern firearms which use centerfire cartridges, there are two major types of mechanisms used to trigger the cartridge primer. One uses a hammer and another uses a striker. Therefore, mechanisms that use a hammer are called hammer-fired and the ones that use a striker are called striker fired. As you can guess, each mechanism has its own group of supporters.

striker-fired.gif


In contrast to this, striker fired systems operate in linear fashion. The striker is a part that is a bit heavier than a firing pin and it is directly connected to a spring. When the firearm is cocked, the striker is moved against a linear spring and held in position. When the trigger is released, the spring forces the striker forward with enough energy to detonate the primer upon impact. The animated image below shows how this works.


The striker is the long part in the back of the gun that looks like this:


striker.jpg


It should be noted that the animation example for a striker fired weapon shows the firing mechanism of a Glock pistol. When a Glock is cocked, the striker is moved back and held under partial spring tension by the trigger mechanism and safety devices. As the trigger is pulled, the striker is initially pulled back till the spring reaches full tension and then the striker is released. In other pistol models, such as Springfield XD or Smith & Wesson M&P models, the striker is already held at full spring tension when it is cocked. Pulling the trigger in such firearms merely releases the striker and allows it to fly forward


From the above images, we see that hammer fired mechanisms use a rotational force to detonate the primer, whereas striker fired mechanisms use a linear force to do it.

(Inspired by Blog.nl )
Have a good cigar and regards
ARMARIN
 

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Hammer Fired vs. Striker Fired

Striker fired mechanisms tend to have fewer parts than hammer fired mechanisms and are therefore simpler. However, they take up a bit more room. This is why firearms that don't have bolts, such as revolvers, use a hammer-fired action. Revolver and many types of single-shot action firearms generally don't have the room to accommodate a striker mechanism.

Strikers are commonly found in many modern semi-automatic pistols, bolt action weapons and shotguns. In fact, the first striker fired weapon invented was a shotgun invented by Daniel LeFever in 1878. Another example of a striker fired weapon is the Czech vz.58, which we studied earlier (contrast this with the similar looking AKM rifle, which uses a hammer fired mechanism). Striker fired pistols started becoming popular in the 1980s, when Glock started using them on their pistols. However, it must be noted that Glock weren't the first to use it on pistols either: John Browing used it in the .25 caliber Model N pistol and the H&K P7 is striker fired as well. Nevertheless, once Glock started becoming popular, other manufacturers also started using the same idea on a larger scale and now you have several pistol models, such as Smith & Wesson M&P, Springfield XD, Ruger SR9 etc. However, there are some famous pistol models that use a hammer fired mechanism instead. Examples include the Colt M1911, Browning Hi-Power, Beretta M9 etc.

A striker fired mechanism doesn't have an exposed hammer, so it cannot get caught in clothing, shrubs etc. The fact that it has fewer parts means easier maintenance as well. Another positive is that it has a consistent trigger pull for every shot (in contrast to double action/single action hammer fired mechanisms, where the trigger pull force is different depending on whether the firearm is working in single action mode or double action mode). Striker fired mechanisms generally have a consistent trigger reset as well.

On the other hand, if there is a malfunction on a striker fired weapon because the primer didn't detonate, the only option is to eject the cartridge and try the next one. With a hammer fired firearm, it may be possible to try again on the same cartridge (on models that provide this second-strike capability). Hammer fired guns also generally impact primers harder than strikers do, thereby giving a better chance to detonate them. It is for these reasons that many military forces prefer hammer fired weapons. For example, the US military's choices of weapons: Colt M1911 pistol, Beretta M9 pistol, M1 Garand, M14 rifle, M16 rifle, M4 carbine etc. are all hammer-fired.

The video below shows some of the advantages and disadvantages of each system:
https://youtu.be/6D3Qxa9hyrM


(Inspired by Blog.nl )

Have a good cigar and regards
ARMARIN
 

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Understand the importance of a proper grip



First, you need to determine the type of gun you will be shooting. A semi-automatic handgun has a slide that shoots back whenever the weapon is fired. If your thumb is sticking up behind the gun, you may just lose it or at the very least have a very painful broken bone.


If you are firing a revolver, you will notice a small gap between the chamber and the cylinder. Do not put your fingers near this gap when firing otherwise you will be burned.


YouTube channel Hickok45 actually has demonstrations of both:




(Inspired by YouTube channel Hickok45 )

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ARMARIN
 

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I would like to know what the USMC now teaches about accurately firing AR-pattern rifles. Specifically, what to do with the thumb on the trigger hand. During WWII, Marines were taught to not put the thumb over the stock and grip it like a broom handle, but rather, to rest it above the knuckle of the trigger finger.

What's current USMC rifle doctrine for the AR-pattern rifles? Thumb around, thumb to the side, anything else?
 

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Black powder is not the same as Smokeless Powder NEVER try and Mix the two or substitute one for the other.
 
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I know I always check twice to see if a weapon is unloaded. And not just the chamber but the mag well as well. If I'm at a range I bring a flash light so I can see with enough light to positively see its empty.

Not once, Twice. Also Ive noticed most ADs and NDs happen to big talkers who cant shut up when handling their guns. Along with that they hurry either to impress or to shoot past their skill level. Keep your mind on the gun. I havn't had a ND cause I know mine is right around the corner the second I take my mind off that gun and always will be for my entire life.
 

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Ammo questions...

I have been reading this thread, but it's hard on my eyes, so I thought that I'd just ask since maybe others might have similar questions.

I have just ordered two Henry Rifles, both are .45 caliber, so I'm checking into ammo for them, and I am curious as to the grains of the various brands of ammo. I see that there is 200 grain ammo, as well as 255 grain ammo. Does that mean that the 255 grain is a more powerful round? I should also mention that I have never owned or used a rifle, but I enjoy shooting my handguns at the range, and my friend has some rifles that she likes to shoot and wants me to shoot. I decided to get the Henry Rifles because I read lots of great things about them, so I decided to add some of them to my small collection of guns. My friend is anxious to shoot them at the range with me, so I decided to check into ammo, and I wasn't sure what the differences are in the different grains in the ammo.

Another question is the caliber...one rifle comes in .41 caliber, .357 magnum, .44 magnum, .327 mag, and .45 Colt. The other comes in a .44-40, and a .45 Colt. I opted for the 45 Colt versions since they would use the same ammo, so I was wondering how each ammo caliber compares in recoil, accuracy, and range?

I appreciate any and all help that you can offer. Thank you.
 

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.45 Colt (unless specialty ammo) is a pussycat. Recoil is a soft and gentle push.

Ammo 'grain weight' refers to projectile weight.

Magnum rounds usually move faster at the cost of sharper and harder recoil than do non-magnum rounds. This, potentially, gives them greater range.

Accuracy is a function of the shooter.
 

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Hello everyone,

I have a quick question about ammo calibers. I have just purchased a hi point 4095 .40 s&w carbine rifle. This is only my 2nd firearm and am still trying to understand certain things. When I search for ammo to purchase for this rifle, the majority of .40 s&w that I find says that it is "pistol" ammo on the box. I am assuming caliber size is good for both pistol and rifle, but I need someone to help clarify this for me.

Thank you!
 

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You assume correctly
 
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Aim true !
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Them Hi-point carbine's are a blast to shoot. Enjoy!!
 

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Thank you Popeye!

I was told the same thing about the Hi point before I purchased it, Coalcracker. I should have it to a range in about a week !
 

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Cool give us a range report then.
 
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