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I have been using centerfire designs for months. But I don’t have any idea about rimfires Recently I came to know that when we do dry fire in a rimfire rifles it ill affect the gun’s performance because of its brittle firing pins. If we do so how many rounds of dryfire will it take to affect the gun. Or is there any Gun Customization tricks to make it more reliable
 

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If the manufacturer says you can dry fire it I dry fire it. I don't repeatably dry fire it though without a snap cap. I also use the dry wall anchors and had limited success feeding it from a magazine.

I just had a thought. To put a core in the dry wall anchor to make it feed through magazines. I'll try to find the right size dowel or nail or maybe even silicone or hot glue and see what works best.
 
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If it's an older gun you should never dry fire it. There is no certain number of times it can be done before damage happens. That would depend on the strength of the steel used in the barrel and firing pin, it can damage either or both. Some new guns, especially striker fired .22's can be dry fired safely being the firing pin will not contact the edge of the chamber. Either way using a snap cap in all .22's is recommended. Like stated above you can use a spent case, buy commercially made snap caps or be ingenious and use the dry wall anchor(cool idea!).
 

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If it's an older gun you should never dry fire it. There is no certain number of times it can be done before damage happens. That would depend on the strength of the steel used in the barrel and firing pin, it can damage either or both.
I have an NAA mini revolver that has a fairly soft steel used in the hammer. The “firing pin” is just a wedge on the hammer. I looked a few in the gun shop that it was apparent they’d been dry fired a few times due to the hammer being blunted. That’s definitely one you don’t want to dry fire.
 

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Ruger's LCR22 manual says you can dryfire. It's up the gun maker.
What he said. Many of the modern striker fire .22's can be safely dry fired and it should state whether i can be done or not in the owners manual.
 
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It’s just a good practice not to dry fire a .22. Does it happen? Yeah. Does it break the firing pin? Probably not but why abuse it and test it’s limits. I’m a .22 fanatic. I almost never dry fire any of them, especially the older rifles and if I do it’s by accident. Like, “I’m empty???” It’s just a good rule of thumb.
 

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This Browning Buckmark Contour was purchased NIB from a distributor. When it arrived there was a slight "ding" on the chamber mouth, where it had been dry fired with an empty chamber. I make sure that I install a dry wall anchor in the chamber so I can relax the hammer spring without damage:



It's my choice to relax the compression of the hammer spring after cleaning and putting my .22 firearms away, and will NEVER do it differently.

So, the title is: "Dryfiring In Rimfire". Sure you can, but it's best to use some sort of chamber mouth protection to prevent one of these:

 

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Here's what Ruger recommends for dry firing their Ruger Mark pistols. Remove the bolt and take out the firing pin. You can then dry fire safely until your heart's content.
But for the basic question, "Can you dry fire a .22 rimfire firearm?" Sure.
 
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