National Gun Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,309 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter


Credit: @michaelagiulia

A passenger has captured a dramatic video of a United Airlines Boeing 777 engine fire after it suffered a major failure.

The entire cowling structure has separated from the engine and parts have been ingested into the engine causing the failure and fire.

The 777 was operating flight UA328 from Denver to Honolulu and was climbing out of out Denver’s runway 27 when the right-hand Pratt and Whitney engine’s inlet separated associated with the failure of the engine.

Aviation Herald reports that the pilots declared a Mayday reporting the 777 engine fire.

“The aircraft stopped the climb at about 13,000 feet, the crew requested to return to Denver after running the checklists, AH reported.

“The aircraft returned to Denver for a safe landing on runway 26 about 23 minutes after departure. The aircraft stopped on the runway for a check by emergency services.”

The engine inlet fell into the neighborhood of Broomfield, located about 15km west of Denver.

In a statement United Airlines said;

“Flight UA328 from Denver to Honolulu experienced an engine failure shortly after departure, returned safely to Denver, and was met by emergency crews as a precaution. There are no reported injuries onboard. We are in contact with the FAA, NTSB, and local law enforcement.”

Here is the dramatic video of the 777 engine fire.

Flight 328 @united engine caught fire. my parents are on this flight 🙃🙃 everyone’s okay though! pic.twitter.com/cBt82nIkqb
— michaela🦋 (@michaelagiulia) February 20, 2021

Debris rained down. Here are some pictures from @I_am_katertott and Aviation Herald.









Here are some images from: @tamaskls





The US air traffic control provider, the FAA said:

“A Boeing 777-200 operated by United Airlines returned to Denver International Airport and landed safety Saturday after experiencing a right-engine failure shortly after takeoff,” the FAA said in a statement. “The FAA is aware of reports of debris in the vicinity of the airplane’s flight path. The passengers deplaned on Runway 26-Right and were bused to the terminal.” – FAA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,309 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
I can't explain the "photo doubles" nor the lack of the video. BUT........Aviation and Flying ARE SUPPOSE TO BE EXCITING!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,309 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
This is one of the first five B777's that I, as a Pratt & Whitney Field Representative on the P&W Flight Test Team, provided technical support on at Boeing Field in 1995 during B777 Flight Test. United Airlines was the Entry-Into-Service "Launch Customer" for the Boeing B777.

It is reported the engine suffered a fan blade separation which caused metal debris to be ingested into the engine. The "orange glow" is in the plane of the High Pressure Turbine Assembly. The big yellow-colored band on the front of the engine is the Kevlar Fan Blade Containment band that is wrapped around the Fan Case. It is made up of about 28 wraps of Kevlar to form a band that is almost two (2) inches thick. It apparently worked in containing the liberated fan blade. No other engine case penetrations or rotating parts release have been reported, thus far. Some small gas-path parts debris may have exited the exhaust pipe. The PW4084 engine has a fan inlet diameter of 112 inches and generates 84,000 pounds of thrust.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,086 Posts
..Aviation and Flying ARE SUPPOSE TO BE EXCITING!
I'm sure that was pretty exciting for the passengers, pilots and other crew as well as anyone on the ground watching or dodging debris. Being excited isn't always pleasant though!
Oh and whether it was easy or not kudos for the pilots for bringing that thing down rubber first.
 

·
AZHerper
Joined
·
4,126 Posts
This is one of the first five B777's that I, as a Pratt & Whitney Field Representative on the P&W Flight Test Team, provided technical support on at Boeing Field in 1995 during B777 Flight Test. United Airlines was the Entry-Into-Service "Launch Customer" for the Boeing B777.

It is reported the engine suffered a fan blade separation which caused metal debris to be ingested into the engine. The "orange glow" is in the plane of the High Pressure Turbine Assembly. The big yellow-colored band on the front of the engine is the Kevlar Fan Blade Containment band that is wrapped around the Fan Case. It is made up of about 28 wraps of Kevlar to form a band that is almost two (2) inches thick. It apparently worked in containing the liberated fan blade. No other engine case penetrations or rotating parts release have been reported, thus far. Some small gas-path parts debris may have exited the exhaust pipe. The PW4084 engine has a fan inlet diameter of 112 inches and generates 84,000 pounds of thrust.
Interesting that you were a Field Rep for P&W in 1995. I was a Field Rep for RCA on a BMEWS (radar) installation team in Clear Alaska in 1962 so I understand the "Field Rep" business. Congrats!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,731 Posts
Clean underwear is stowed under your seat, please dispose of the soiled underwear in the plastic bag and SEAL it! Thank you for flying United Airlines.
 

·
Grand Imperial Poobah
Joined
·
23,187 Posts
Somewhere there is a airline mechanic saying to himself, "That's where those bolts were suppose to go!" :ROFLMAO:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Speed

·
Keep calm & return fire!
Joined
·
12,906 Posts
This is one of the first five B777's that I, as a Pratt & Whitney Field Representative on the P&W Flight Test Team, provided technical support on at Boeing Field in 1995 during B777 Flight Test. United Airlines was the Entry-Into-Service "Launch Customer" for the Boeing B777.

It is reported the engine suffered a fan blade separation which caused metal debris to be ingested into the engine. The "orange glow" is in the plane of the High Pressure Turbine Assembly. The big yellow-colored band on the front of the engine is the Kevlar Fan Blade Containment band that is wrapped around the Fan Case. It is made up of about 28 wraps of Kevlar to form a band that is almost two (2) inches thick. It apparently worked in containing the liberated fan blade. No other engine case penetrations or rotating parts release have been reported, thus far. Some small gas-path parts debris may have exited the exhaust pipe. The PW4084 engine has a fan inlet diameter of 112 inches and generates 84,000 pounds of thrust.
Any idea what the roundabout cost is going to be to repair the plane?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,309 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
The "wing Gremlin" only Shatner could see.

My third post has a "third video" showing the two thrust-reverser halves (900 pounds each) drifting gently to earth like autumn leaves. A great catch by the observer who videoed the "raining aluminum".

A replacement engine and thrust reverser/inlet cowl assemblies will run about $14 Million. Actually a bit more as $14 Million is 1995 dollar estimate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,309 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Historically, high by-pass fan engines experiencing fan-blade losses do so due to Foreign Object Damage (FOD) that occurs at or near the fan blade leading-edge platform radius. The investigators will in all likelihood find FOD strike witness mark evidence on the leading edge of the remaining short blade stub. This is a "typical failure mode" when visual and physical inspections are not performed post-flight to detect object strike damage that may produce nicks in the blade leading edge. Running a thumbnail down the blade leading edge under adverse lighting conditions will detect nicks and damage, every time! And "time" is always in short supply between flights. Revenue flight First, maintenance Second.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top