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Just Some Dude...
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This all depends on the firearm for me... but honestly... as long as it has "Action"... I'm good either way!
My carry gun is a Single though.
 

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Texas Legal Gunslinger
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SA for me.
 

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Chicago Pro-Gun Activist
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SA for me too.
 

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I prefer double action for a carry gun simply because I'm not comfortable carrying a single action with one in the chamber, and safety off. I'm quite comfortable with having the heavy pull of double action as my only safety though (and I always use a holster, so the trigger is covered). One of these days, maybe I'll be comfortable enough carrying a Glock in condition 1, but not just yet. As far as a mechanical safety, I don't really like them for a carry gun. I would rather have a DA/SA, and carry it decocked (DA) with the safety off. My preference however, is for DA only.
 

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Harley Dude
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14,651 Posts
For target work I like the single action. But for carry I like the safety of double action for my pocket pistols.

I will sometimes carry my compact lightweight Kimber 45 acp in a cocked and locked mode. I feel comfortable with the 1911 in that configuration since I have many, many, many years of experience with those weapons and like them a lot. You just have to be very cautious when you lower your safety to unload the round from the chamber. Thats when the accidents can and do happen. Be aware and point that barrel away from yourself and towards the ground or at a safety pad.
 

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Texas Legal Gunslinger
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3,531 Posts
You just have to be very cautious when you lower your safety to unload the round from the chamber. Thats when the accidents can and do happen. Be aware and point that barrel away from yourself and towards the ground or at a safety pad.
Yep. That's always the most stressful part for me. I've gotten to the point that I first drop the magazine, with the safety engaged, then, I remove the safety and change my grip so as not to press down the grip safety, and while pointing in a safe direction, rack the slide. Haven't found any way easier way that makes me feel quite as safe. Maybe I'm just a little paranoid......
 

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Harley Dude
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14,651 Posts
Yep. That's always the most stressful part for me. I've gotten to the point that I first drop the magazine, with the safety engaged, then, I remove the safety and change my grip so as not to press down the grip safety, and while pointing in a safe direction, rack the slide. Haven't found any way easier way that makes me feel quite as safe. Maybe I'm just a little paranoid......
I don't think paranoid comes in to play where safety is concerned. Your methoid is a good one and will keep you safe.

I recall the article where the old time police officer sat down at his desk and unloaded his 45 acp and promply blew off his thumb, in his office in front of another officer. So many times the danger comes from being too familiar with your weapon and skipping some of the safety steps.
 

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Just Some Dude...
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1,142 Posts
So many times the danger comes from being too familiar with your weapon and skipping some of the safety steps.
I see that often... folks get too comfortable, or confident, if you will... and start over-looking things like that.
 
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Both & more

For everyday carry: DA only. Ex: SigP250. Because it's safe (hammer submerged), like police gun, so naturally society more approve & hopefully they let me carry it everywhere.

For range shooting: DA. Because I can cock it 1st for SA, or not cock for DA.

For playing: Revolver DA. Russian roulette. :lol:

For show-off: SA only. Ex: Colt ‘Peacemaker’ .45. The best handgun ever made :biggrin5:
 

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SA. Is there aomething else?
 
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I prefer double action for a carry gun simply because I'm not comfortable carrying a single action with one in the chamber, and safety off. I'm quite comfortable with having the heavy pull of double action as my only safety though (and I always use a holster, so the trigger is covered). One of these days, maybe I'll be comfortable enough carrying a Glock in condition 1, but not just yet. As far as a mechanical safety, I don't really like them for a carry gun. I would rather have a DA/SA, and carry it decocked (DA) with the safety off. My preference however, is for DA only.
Ditto me. My typical semiauto handgun practice regardless of caliber is at 20 yards or closer, speed counts, 2 to the torso, 1 to the head, mag change and do it again. And again. And again. :crazy: I've just gotten used to SA/DA. Personal preference is all. That said, my daughter shoots SA with her GP100 .357 and she's fast and accurate.

I like to hunt with a .44 Mag S&W Performance Center model 629 revolver always single action. The first round is the only one that counts so I take it slow and steady.
 

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First things first. You DO NOT carry a SA, be it a 1911 or HP or what ever with one in the pipe and the safety off. A properly tuned 1911 or variant is as safe as you can get. Hell you could throw it down the range and still not trip the hammer. If you do not understand the concept of condition 2 carry, it is simple. If and when you need to draw, as your hand is bring the pistol up and out, your thumb moves to the safety, at the top of your arch, you drop the safety. Easy skill to learn. Like I said, SA is just as safe as a DA. It is the operator that usually messes things up. Also, there is a thing called Israeli Carry. No round in the chamber, then on the draw the slide is racked back. I have seen guys who do this, and they are blindingly fast.
 

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Harley Dude
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First things first. You DO NOT carry a SA, be it a 1911 or HP or what ever with one in the pipe and the safety off. A properly tuned 1911 or variant is as safe as you can get. Hell you could throw it down the range and still not trip the hammer. If you do not understand the concept of condition 2 carry, it is simple. If and when you need to draw, as your hand is bring the pistol up and out, your thumb moves to the safety, at the top of your arch, you drop the safety. Easy skill to learn. Like I said, SA is just as safe as a DA. It is the operator that usually messes things up. Also, there is a thing called Israeli Carry. No round in the chamber, then on the draw the slide is racked back. I have seen guys who do this, and they are blindingly fast.

Yep, agreed. A single action 1911 is a very safe carry weapon. Its the routine of taking a round out of the chamber when unloading that can be tricky to some.

The other issue, of course, is that when the adrenalin is flowing and rounds have been fired it is very easy to touch off that gun since it has a highly sensitive trigger, say maybe around 4 lbs. So for inexperienced folks that cannot take their finger off the trigger when the panic sets in a heavy double action trigger pull may be a better choice. This is why most police departments have gone over to the double action only concept with the heavy trigger modules.
 

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Yep, agreed. A single action 1911 is a very safe carry weapon. Its the routine of taking a round out of the chamber when unloading that can be tricky to some.

The other issue, of course, is that when the adrenalin is flowing and rounds have been fired it is very easy to touch off that gun since it has a highly sensitive trigger, say maybe around 4 lbs. So for inexperienced folks that cannot take their finger off the trigger when the panic sets in a heavy double action trigger pull may be a better choice. This is why most police departments have gone over to the double action only concept with the heavy trigger modules.

Good points all. In the world of Glocks, the heavy trigger modification is called a "New York Trigger". It is a hold over from when the NY State Police transitioned from revolvers to semi-automatics. They found that officers with any time under their belts preferred the heavier pull because it was what they were use to. I have swapped plenty of those out for lighter 4 pound pulls for cops in town. 4 pounds is not that light, well compared to a 12 -14 pound DA it is. 4-4.5 is pretty much the standard for a personal defense carry gun. Where people get in trouble is when they start walking around with 1.5 pound competition triggers. Or better yet start hacking away at the sear with a file trying to save themselves $45 by "doing it themselves". When I get those clusters, it then becomes $45 plus the cost of sear and hammer. I will only do a super light trigger on a known comp/race gun. Everyone else gets 4.5 or heavier. I also slip in about 1/16th of an inch of slack on the trigger as an extra safety feature.

It still boils down to the operator. If any pistol DA or SA goes off on its own, it is broken and needs fixing. If the user doesn't have control over the trigger, well....It is a pretty poor carpenter that blames his hammer.

Using a firearm is a learned skill. People need to practice. This way when the adrenaline is flowing, your mind goes back to muscle memory and training. If you do a fast draw 100 times a day doing all the motions, starting slowly then building speed as you get better, when the SHTF you can react automatically. A true trained shooter will not remember drawing and firing. But there are very few of those running around.
 

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Harley Dude
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14,651 Posts
Good points all. In the world of Glocks, the heavy trigger modification is called a "New York Trigger". It is a hold over from when the NY State Police transitioned from revolvers to semi-automatics. They found that officers with any time under their belts preferred the heavier pull because it was what they were use to. I have swapped plenty of those out for lighter 4 pound pulls for cops in town. 4 pounds is not that light, well compared to a 12 -14 pound DA it is. 4-4.5 is pretty much the standard for a personal defense carry gun. Where people get in trouble is when they start walking around with 1.5 pound competition triggers. Or better yet start hacking away at the sear with a file trying to save themselves $45 by "doing it themselves". When I get those clusters, it then becomes $45 plus the cost of sear and hammer. I will only do a super light trigger on a known comp/race gun. Everyone else gets 4.5 or heavier. I also slip in about 1/16th of an inch of slack on the trigger as an extra safety feature.

It still boils down to the operator. If any pistol DA or SA goes off on its own, it is broken and needs fixing. If the user doesn't have control over the trigger, well....It is a pretty poor carpenter that blames his hammer.

Using a firearm is a learned skill. People need to practice. This way when the adrenaline is flowing, your mind goes back to muscle memory and training. If you do a fast draw 100 times a day doing all the motions, starting slowly then building speed as you get better, when the SHTF you can react automatically. A true trained shooter will not remember drawing and firing. But there are very few of those running around.

Excellent info, thanks!
 
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