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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've seen several feral hog shoot videos. I've seen the hunter fire his gun at a large herd of hogs. He might hit the first one but then continue to fire upon more that are moving. It is hard to shoot an animal that is running accurately with a rifle . The hunters seem to be wounding a lot of pigs while fired at while running. They should only be fired at while standing still unless they are charging or attacking. Perhaps the pig hunter should shoot at up to five still hogs at a time then confirm all five dead before he continues to shoot more.

I was trained by an NRA hunting instructor to never shoot in bulk. Account for each and every animal and bird fired upon.

Having read several hunting articles in Gun Digest over the years, several authors would refer to this kind of bulk shooting as "slob hunting".




https://thebiggamehuntingblog.com/6-hunting-ethics-that-every-new-hunter-should-know/


"Let me put it this way: when you pull the trigger or release an arrow, you should be almost completely certain you are going to hit and kill the animal you’re aiming at. You should not take a shot to find out if you can hit an animal. If there is any doubt in your mind that you’re going to hit the animal you are shooting at, then you should not take the shot. If you are surprised that you hit the animal with a shot, you were shooting from too far away.

Note that this only applies to an initial shot at an unwounded animal. If you wound an animal with your first shot, then you owe it to the animal to take as many follow-up shots as necessary to bring it down. This sometimes means doing things that are unacceptable for an initial shot like shooting at a running animal, shooting at longer than usual ranges, or taking shots when the orientation of the animal is not ideal."

It appears as the man in the hog video has wounded at least one hog but failed to fire follow-up shots before firing at other pigs. He also appears to be taking initial shots at running hogs.

 

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Some places have a feral hog problem. The wounded ones may die later. Those hunters are trying to cut the herd down.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Some places have a feral hog problem. The wounded ones may die later. Those hunters are trying to cut the herd down.
That's fine. I wish they would just make sure each and every pig that's shot at stays down before training their sights on the next animal. I wish they would not take initial shots on running animals. The wounded animals that run off could suffer for hours if not days before they die. Firing precisely at a still animal is much less likely to wound it to begin with.

This Keith Warren looks sloppy. He doesn't impress me as a rifleman and a good marksman. He appears to be banging away wildly at a herd of pigs.

https://thebiggamehuntingblog.com/6-hunting-ethics-that-every-new-hunter-should-know/ states:

"Let me put it this way: when you pull the trigger [squeeze in the case of a rifle] or release an arrow, you should be almost completely certain you are going to hit and kill the animal you’re aiming at. You should not take a shot to find out if you can hit an animal. If there is any doubt in your mind that you’re going to hit the animal you are shooting at, then you should not take the shot. If you are surprised that you hit the animal with a shot, you were shooting from too far away.

Note that this only applies to an initial shot at an unwounded animal. If you wound an animal with your first shot, then you owe it to the animal to take as many follow-up shots as necessary to bring it down. This sometimes means doing things that are unacceptable for an initial shot like shooting at a running animal, shooting at longer than usual ranges, or taking shots when the orientation of the animal is not ideal."
 

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I watched the video. Looks like he did pretty darn good.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
You ain't never been hog culling, have you?
No, I have not been except I've been selective about which pork products I buy at the market.
I cull out ham that is too high in fat. I also cull out the thin-sliced bacon for thick-sliced.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I watched the video. Looks like he did pretty darn good.
I've never pig-hunted before. Only deer and other species.

If I were to shoot feral hogs for pest control, I would:

1. select one still-standing hog from the herd within the range of my level of competence as a rifleman
2. carefully aim and fire by SQUEEZING the trigger
3. stay with this animal until I was absolutely sure it was down and stays down
4. look for another animal from the herd
5. repeat 1-4

As a soldier, expert rifle, I was trained to make every shot count. Firing wildly wastes ammunition and results in wounded animals and misses.
 

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Have you ever had Rocky mountain oysters or had them stuffed?
 

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They need to be anatomically correct if mounted now. :cornut:
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
They need to be anatomically correct if mounted now. :cornut:
I don't dream of having a mounted hog in my home, only red fox.
But yes, the taxidermist should do a decent job for the money paid.

I do have a few scale models of farm animals in resin and porcelain and most appear anatomically correct on the outside.
Male dogs, Angus bull and stallion have manhood; females (cow, jenny and ewe) have udders.

The porcelain piglet and fox figures show no private area detail.
 

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The point of that kind of “hunting” isn’t to be ethical but to do as much killing as possible. You’ll notice that this is done at night with thermal scopes. Those hogs are almost impossible to even find in the day time. They’ve been hunted and are real smart. Those guys will trap as many as possible and shoot them in the trap just to get rid of them. It’s eliminate them. “Terminate with extreme prejudice.”
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The point of that kind of “hunting” isn’t to be ethical but to do as much killing as possible. You’ll notice that this is done at night with thermal scopes. Those hogs are almost impossible to even find in the day time. They’ve been hunted and are real smart. Those guys will trap as many as possible and shoot them in the trap just to get rid of them. It’s eliminate them. “Terminate with extreme prejudice.”
One might think having dogs to round them up into an enclosure would be much more efficient.
Coyotes are another big trouble to ag persons.
 

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My neighbor started Coyote hunting. But at daybreak. I told him they are not deer lol. They need to be hunted at night. Im supposed to go with too.
 

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I've seen several feral hog shoot videos. I've seen the hunter fire his gun at a large herd of hogs. He might hit the first one but then continue to fire upon more that are moving. It is hard to shoot an animal that is running accurately with a rifle . The hunters seem to be wounding a lot of pigs while fired at while running. They should only be fired at while standing still unless they are charging or attacking. Perhaps the pig hunter should shoot at up to five still hogs at a time then confirm all five dead before he continues to shoot more.

I was trained by an NRA hunting instructor to never shoot in bulk. Account for each and every animal and bird fired upon.

Having read several hunting articles in Gun Digest over the years, several authors would refer to this kind of bulk shooting as "slob hunting".




https://thebiggamehuntingblog.com/6-hunting-ethics-that-every-new-hunter-should-know/


"Let me put it this way: when you pull the trigger or release an arrow, you should be almost completely certain you are going to hit and kill the animal you’re aiming at. You should not take a shot to find out if you can hit an animal. If there is any doubt in your mind that you’re going to hit the animal you are shooting at, then you should not take the shot. If you are surprised that you hit the animal with a shot, you were shooting from too far away.

Note that this only applies to an initial shot at an unwounded animal. If you wound an animal with your first shot, then you owe it to the animal to take as many follow-up shots as necessary to bring it down. This sometimes means doing things that are unacceptable for an initial shot like shooting at a running animal, shooting at longer than usual ranges, or taking shots when the orientation of the animal is not ideal."

It appears as the man in the hog video has wounded at least one hog but failed to fire follow-up shots before firing at other pigs. He also appears to be taking initial shots at running hogs.

At least three times he said, “This is not hunting, it is eradication of feral hogs.” You might not appreciate the methods and you are certainly not seeing all the action on the video clips, but until you have had to deal with the problem that is as bad as it is there, maybe you should not judge too harshly what you see until you have experienced what they endure. Dealing with an infestation can require more extreme measures at times.
 

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I've never pig-hunted before. Only deer and other species.

If I were to shoot feral hogs for pest control, I would:

1. select one still-standing hog from the herd within the range of my level of competence as a rifleman
2. carefully aim and fire by SQUEEZING the trigger
3. stay with this animal until I was absolutely sure it was down and stays down
4. look for another animal from the herd
5. repeat 1-4

As a soldier, expert rifle, I was trained to make every shot count. Firing wildly wastes ammunition and results in wounded animals and misses.
Hog hunting isn't the same as deer hunting, they're an invasive species and the entire purpose of shooting them is to reduce the population either by hook or by crook. Wounded animals will become food for predators and many of the hogs killed won't be consumed by humans. In Texas and some other States the hog population is so bad they allow them to be hunted from helicopters. Hogs are smart as hell and generally won't fall the same trick twice, when the opportunity arrises you shoot as many as possible because you're unlikely to get a second chance.

As a soldier you also know that the ratio of shots fired to enemy killed is like 3000:1
 

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This family uses dogs to round up hogs. I used to watch them on TV.
 

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there is hog hunting........which is a meat hunt.......you don't kill more than you can process and put in the freezer.....

then there is varmint hunting of pigs.......where the object is to eliminate the varmints (pigs)........if they die instantly then so be it......if they run 200 yards before they drop then so be it......if they die from an infection a week later then so be it......the object is to eliminate the No.1 varmint/predator problem in Texas.....which is the feral pigs.....they have replaced coyotes as the primary varmint/predator problem in farm and ranch areas.....

they are shot from a helicopter, ground hunted, trapped, shot day or night......and its a loosing battle.

still waiting for poison programs to get approved but the dang tree huggers and liberals are blocking it at every turn....
 
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