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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently inherited this rifle from one of my dad's uncles who recently died.
I was wondering what kind of gun it is.
It's a bolt action shotgun with an engraving on the side which reads 'Long Branch' and underneath '194', which is probably related to the production year somewhere in the 1940's, I assume. Anyhow I couldn't find any more information but i know it fires the green small shotgun shells also on an image below. I don't know anything about guns but I'm really curious what type of gun this is and what year it was produced.

I really hope someone can help me with this,

Regards,
Dwergenkind.




 

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Dong Tam, RSVN '69/'70
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What an interesting firearm... I'm not sure what it is but maybe I can give you a suggestion of where to look for more info.

The stock with the wrist strap, the bolt, barrel, trigger, and configuration of the safety is pure Lee Enfield. In particular the #4 MK1* .303 British Rifle.

The bottom of the stock, from the butt pad forward to the wrist, being straight with no swell, is different.

Long Branch was an armory in Canada that produced a number of these rifles in the early 1940's.

I have never heard of a Lee Enfield Shotgun.

Now, on the other hand, I am not the diffinitive expert on Lee Enfields... this gun may have been altered by someone to make a shotgun. It also maybe a military weapon used as a line thrower or some other purpose not evident at this time.

I would do a Google Search for a Lee Enfield Gun Forum or a military collectible weapons forum and post these pictures along with your question.

Please keep us informed as you learn more about this very curious piece....

Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well at least I found out it fires .410 cartridges and it appears that non shotgun rifles who are chambered in this caliber sometimes where able to fire those shotguns shells as well, therefor it probably is just a rifle instead of a shotgun.
 

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If you did not say it was a shotgun I would have said a hacked up 1941 Long Branch Enfield. Long Branch was a real good maufacture of Enfields from what I found. I did a little search and it seems Enfield did make single shot .410 shotguns. Also some had their Lee Enfields way back when modified to shoot the .410 shell it seems. Here is a little snip I found from searching that might also help along with the other info I found....



"Numerous attempts were made to convert the .410 Shotgun model (which was single shot, and generally manufactured by the Ishapore arsenal) to a bolt-action repeating model by removing the wooden magazine plug and replacing it with a standard 10-round SMLE magazine. None of these is known to have been successful, however, a compromise was reached by fitting a Stevens/Savage .410 magazine into an original SMLE magazine housing. The .410 conversions were mostly used for crowd control as riot shotguns in India. They are chambered for a 2" British .410 shotshell, basically a blown out .303 British cartridge. As these cartridges have not been manufactured for several years, ammunition is strictly a "roll your own" prospect. Many of these conversions have been reamed out to accept modern 2 1/2"-3" .410 shotshells in the United States. As the pressure for even high velocity .410 ammunition are well below standard .303 British pressure ranges these conversions, when done by a competent gunsmith, are quite safe to shoot. ..."



"The Ishapore .410 is a converted No1 MkIII rifle. This modification, sanctioned by the Indian government, was introduced to provide the Indian police with a riot-gun.

The essentials of the conversion consisted of boring out the barrel and reaming its chamber to accept the British .410 shotgun shell. The magazine was removed and the magazine well fitted with a wooden plug, this acted as a filler and loading platform for the single shell. Finally, the rear sight was pinned to eliminate adjustment.

The chamber, as stated, was designed to fit the British .410 shell unlike the standard 3-inch .410 chamber. Shells for this rifle would have to be purchased in .410 British or fire-formed .303 cases would have to be used and hand loaded, should the owner wish to go bird hunting...."

So I would say some one sent this Long Branch in to get converted and somewhere along the way the fore stock was removed for some reason. Also I have noticed and read that some are using the .410 shell in their .303 Enfields but there is some questionability to this for me. Must be a brave person to do this lol. I did not look further into this aspect of shooting the .410 shotgun shell in a .303 Enfield....so don't do it if you have a .303 Enfield ol
 

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Military Rifle Collector
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This is a bubba'ed Lee Enfield Mark 1 #3 single shot shotgun. If you can shoot regualar .410 shells in it then the chamber has been reemed out to handle them. It originally was fed a British .410 shotgun shell. Which is basicly a .303 shell cut down and loaded with shot.
You can read more about them here.
http://www.gunandgame.com/forums/enfield-rifles/50788-lee-enfield-no-1-mark-iii-shotgun.html

Sad to see what someone did to yours. But on the other hand replacement stocks are not that hard to get.
I would seriously consider rebuilding your shotgun. If you dont want to you should sell it to someone who will.
 

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It looks like something my #1 son would make from old gas pipe and railroad spikes.

Alan
 

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At one time, shortly after WW2, there were hundreds of thousands of milsurp firearms flooding the market - many of which we would today consider collectible, was at that time a cheap garage project gun. This appears to be one of the later. Military firearms weren't produced to be collector's items.
 
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