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Harley Dude
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14,651 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After reloading?

I see Dillon offers a Hand Soap called D-LEAD mfg by ESCA Tech, inc. It is designed to remove heavy metals and paint dust from the skin and fingernails. Will remove lead, nickel, cadmium, arsenic, mercury, silver, zinc and most other heavy metals.

It cheap at $2.95 per 8 oz. Have you used it?

I think it might be a good idea and I am going to order a couple of bottles with my next Dillon order. Might order one of those sexy gals that he has on his cover too.
 

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Ruler of Ramnation
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1,013 Posts
I use gloves and yes, I wash up after cleaning firearms or reloading.
 

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Premium Member
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15,424 Posts
Always. I use Dawn dishwashing liquid on my hands and forearms and it does a great job. If I'm doing large amounts of lead or plated lead projectiles (over 500 rounds) I usually wear latex surgical gloves.

To be honest, as long as I've been loading (>35 yrs) it's only within the last 8 to 10 yrs that I've taken the precaution of the gloves. It just never seemed to be that hazardous. Well, it is, and I hope the other loaders get the word also.

Along the same lines, I never used to wear gloves when cleaning firearms. Now, when I come back from the range with several guns to clean, I wear gloves. If you think about it, you're handling solvents which by itself is not great for you, and those solvents are designed to break down the lead and copper in your barrel. So you not only have lead, you have the microscopic particles that you're cleaning out of your guns, in suspension in a solvent. I admit that I've seen no studies, but in my itty-bitty brain, it can't be good for me. So I'll wear gloves just to be on the safe side.

I'd hate to make my next birthday only to wake up and find both my nipples on the same side of my chest.
 

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Registered
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3,633 Posts
I wear surgical gloves for the dirty work. And go bear handed when doing the actual loading. Just wash with cold water (which is impossible here in Tucson during the summer) to keep your pores from opening and you will be in good shape. I ran this by the OSHA guy at work and he agreed. I use Dawn as my soap also.

The next question is, do you wash your brass before tumbling?
 

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Premium Member
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15,424 Posts
I only wash brass when it is stained/oxidized or has any foreign matter on it. When I do so I have a Thumler's Model B and use a special solution that I've developed myself. It works very well. I then dry the brass in a 225 degree oven and then dry tumble normally.
 
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