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North Carolina resident 12-year-old Mike Wimmer
He graduated from not only high school, but the intelligent young man also graduated from college in the same week.
The North Carolina resident said he decided to increase his school workload while the coronavirus pandemic kept him at home.
“I didn’t have to commute to school, so that actually gave me a lot more time to be able to pick up extra classes,” he explained, adding, “It was like, well, we’re sitting here doing nothing, right? So might as well take a few extra classes and get some stuff knocked out.”

Wimmer finished up his high school requirements in December, then worked on his community college assignments during the spring. He also said he has always been known as an advanced student.

He also used his free time to start two technology companies.
The first, Next Era Innovations, Mike began when he was seven.

VIDEO: 12-Year-Old Boy Graduates High School, College in Same Week
 

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Prince, West Virginia
2010 census, its population was 116.
Water Ecoregion Slope Natural landscape Mountain

It’s the closest station to Beckley on Amtrak’s Cardinal Line, it actually serves a few thousand passengers a year.
Prince’s train station was built in 1946, replacing earlier facilities that dated back to the 1880’s.
Property Furniture Window Building Chair

Train Sky Automotive lighting Vehicle Asphalt
 

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So i let a spring fly across the room.
Found this place.
Badge Font Crest Symbol Shield

Seems like a decent place to shop.

Found the spring the next day.
Still happy i found this place, and now have backups for the next time, and some cool stickers.
 

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Wheel Automotive tire Tire Toy Automotive design


 

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amazing things technology can create.
Yes kick starters are hit and miss. Sort of like gambling.
Looks like a stiff price. Maybe a one and done.
 

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Omniphobic hull coatings

US Navy ONR sponsors development of omniphobic coating for ships

The potential of omniphobic hull coatings, which are under development by the US Navy’s Office of Naval Research, was perhaps the most obviously pertinent development. Omniphobic hull coatings would not only repel water (hydrophobia) but all manner of other substances, including oil. Griffin outlined how this technology could dramatically increase the efficiency of hulls and reduce costs.

“An omniphobic hull coating is currently being produced by the US Navy, but they are being a little secretive about it,” continued Griffin. “This technology has cut fuel costs by around 80 per cent when moving slowly and 40-50 per cent at faster speeds on an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer. Not only that, they found that is also made the US Navy’s destroyers much quieter.”

 
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Shipwreck dated to December 1680.
Maritime archaeologists in northern Germany have discovered the wreckage of a 400-year-old cargo ship that "sank almost standing," escaped decay from ravenous shipworms and still has the barrels of lime it was carrying for the stone-building industry centuries ago.

The ship, a rare discovery, is from the Hanseatic period, when a group of northern European trade guilds dominated the Baltic and North seas from the 13th to 17th centuries,

 

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The thing about 20-foot-tall, 110-ton limestone statue 'Sitting Man' Iowa City, Iowa
Sky Plant Statue Sculpture Art


IOWA CITY - The thing about 20-foot-tall, 110-ton limestone statues - like Doug Paul's - is they tend to stay put.

'It was not made to be moved,” said Paul of the gargantuan statue overlooking Scott Boulevard, first called 'Man on a Bench” but now called 'Sitting Man.”

But after five years of sitting stony-faced and gazing west over Harvest Preserve, both the man and his bench were on the move this month.

Last October, Paul - who designed 'Man on a Bench” and carved it over the course of a year alongside local stonemason JB Barnhouse - completed an exchange of 170 acres with ACT. Paul gained land west of his 100-acre Harvest Preserve and ACT got a stretch of land that goes from its campus along the north and east side of Scott Boulevard.

The only thing atypical about the land swap is it required Paul to move the statue from the east side of Scott Boulevard to his newly acquired land on the west side of Scott. Once again, Paul enlisted the help of Barnhouse, who opened Country Stonemasons in North Liberty in 2003.

While Paul told The Gazette in October he wasn't quite sure how the statue would be moved, Barnhouse said this month he had no doubt it could be done.

'We were 100 percent confident in the fact that we had the ability, the tools and the team to get it done,” Barnhouse said.

Barnhouse and Paul also enlisted Ockenfels Crane Co. and Bockenstedt Excavating Inc. to get the job done. Crews started last Tuesday, were delayed by weather midweek, but had the statue moved and reassembled by Friday.

The movers faced one challenge right out of the gate. The 11 blocks of carved Indiana limestone that make up the statue are connected by stainless steel pins to keep the pieces from shifting.

Cloud Sky Plant Statue Sculpture


'The sculpture is held together by gravity,” Paul said. 'The pins are simply to hold it in place.”

Barnhouse said a pin in the shoulder 'just did not want to let go.”

'It was doing its job,” Barnhouse said. 'Finally, it gave up and came out.”

After that, the move 'could not have gone smoother,” Barnhouse said. From there, the statue was moved block by block from one side of Scott Boulevard to the other on the back of trucks.

Paul said he had faith in everyone he entrusted with moving the statue, but admits it was 'anxious work.” He had a couple of contingency plans in place should anything go awry.

'If we broke it in the wrong places, it would just become an abstract,” Paul said. 'The other option I was well-prepared for was, if one of the stones broke, I would just order a new stone and carve it again.”

Ultimately, the sculpture sustained no major damage in the move. Barnhouse said there were a couple of 'blow outs” - damage to the stone that occurs when lifting and the load isn't level. The worst was a dinner plate-sized one in the stomach that will be repaired.

Barnhouse - a graduated of London's Building Crafts College - employed a few other tricks of the trade in the move.

For instance, since there was no way to get the straps used for moving out from under the 43,000-pound bench when it was placed, Barnhouse and his team sat the bench on ice slabs formed in pie pans. That allowed the crew to get the straps out before the ice melted, and the bench settled into place.

Some finish work on the statue remains and Paul said he'll plant grass around the statue and take out the service road he put in to facilitate the move. But now, the renamed 'Sitting Man” sits in his new home, looking east and watching the sunrise over Iowa City each morning.

'The statue is now on Harvest Preserve and will be on Harvest Preserve forever,” said Paul. 'I say that thinking he would have been forever where he used to be. ‘Forever' is a variable term.”
 
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