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Emergency crews in central Florida were working Sunday to prevent an environmental catastrophe at a leaking reservoir that risked sending millions of gallons of contaminated wastewater toward nearby homes and into the Tampa Bay.

More than 300 homes near the site of an abandoned phosphate mine and fertilizer-production facility in Manatee County were under mandatory evacuation orders, and Governor Ron DeSantis on Saturday declared a state of emergency to free up funds to tackle the crisis.

"What we are looking at now is trying to prevent, and respond to if need be, a real catastrophic flood situation," DeSantis told a press conference after viewing the site by helicopter Sunday.

He said emergency workers, assisted by the Florida National Guard, were pumping about 33 million gallons of water daily out of a wastewater reservoir at the site, which has sprung a growing leak in its plastic lining.

"According to on-site engineers, a controlled release was necessary to prevent a catastrophic failure," the governor said.

The wastewater "meets water-quality standards for marine waters," he said, with the exception of phosphorous and nitrogen levels.

Marine algae thrive on such elements, and environmental groups fear the release of millions of gallons of nutrient-rich water into the ocean could trigger a deadly "red tide," or algal bloom, that can suffocate fish and other aquatic life and deter tourist activity.

A collapse of the reservoir also risked sending water into nearby stacks of phosphogypsum, a leftover from fertilizer production.

Phosphogypsum is considered radioactive as it contains isotopes such as radon, as well as toxic heavy metals like arsenic, lead and mercury.

The Center for Biological Diversity national conservation group called for the US Environmental Protection Agency to step in.

122790
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
 

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These are all over Central Florida. The product of Phosphate processing. When a plant closes, they leave this behind. The ones in the article have been there for years. There are others just up the road in Riverview. Florida tax payers will end up paying to clean this up. The company that owns it have been in Bankruptcy for some time. The Gov may say he's going to hold them responsible but it will like getting blood from a turnip.

Just another douch for lower Tampa Bay and the fishery.
 

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The Center for Biological Diversity national conservation group. Well they should know that if Tampa Bay is "clean" then that isn't very diverse. Solution is to dump some **** in it and make it more diverse. Problem solved.
 

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OMG! The EPA is going to step in! We're all going to die now!

Alan
 

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The wastewater "meets water-quality standards for marine waters," he said, with the exception of phosphorous and nitrogen levels.
They fail to mention that the water is radioactive which is why it is kept in plastic lined ponds. They are waiting for it to evaporate, which it never will because of the amount of rainfall we get.
 

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BTW, The EPA is now saying that the water is not radioactive but the devil is in the details. He is their specific answer:

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency page on fertilizer production, called Radtown, says that phosphogypsum stacks, the preferred storage method for the waste from mining phosphate rock, contains “naturally-occurring uranium, thorium and radium.” Radon, a gas produced as radium decays, is released.

The stacks that are made to store the waste are “covered in water” but as the phosphogypsum sits on the stack, it dries out and forms a crust. Radon is also released from the stack. According to the EPA, as the crust forms on top of the stack, it reduces how much radon is released.
 

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They fail to mention that the water is radioactive which is why it is kept in plastic lined ponds. They are waiting for it to evaporate, which it never will because of the amount of rainfall we get.
Radioactive is such a scary word to many but in reality many harmless things we encounter in life are radioactive. Bananas for example are radioactive and enough of them in one spot can set off radioactive detectors. We have them at our landfill and when they are set off the loads have to be check manually with small handheld detectors and most of the time they are the result of diapers from elderly people getting cancer treatments.

The EPA is going to help! Sounds great, they did such a fantastic job in CO 5 or so years ago....
 
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