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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased this beautiful antique no.32 1875 Marlin Revolver. I took it to the gun store and he was amazed on the condition its in (for how old it is). He said what makes it so great is how the barrel and mechanism that allows the bullet to fire works just as a brand new unused gun would. He said the gun would be worth at least $400. I also tried to buy blanks from the store to attempt to fire them from the gun, the shop I bought the gun told me 8mm/.32 cal. would work. The problem with that is the gunsmith was attempting to fit a .32 caliber blank into the barrel but it would just not fit. He said a 8mm might work but he doesn't know for sure and he couldn't check because 8mm blanks are more rarer than your average 9mm size blanks and he didn't have any 8mm blanks. Anyways I'm pretty sure the gun was produced from 1875-1878 my specific one was made July 1st, 1878. I would like to find out any information you can give me on the gun, how much you think its worth, should I sell it now or wait, what size blanks would it take? Any information would be helpful. With all that being said here are some HD pictures of the antique and thanks in advance for reading and hopefully helping me out.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-U2FjRdFfFKSTRXWTlQbExkY1U/view?usp=sharing

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-U2FjRdFfFKSElUbW5LRTVGM2s/view?usp=sharing

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-U2FjRdFfFKYW1zYWxXN2ttSDQ/view?usp=sharing
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I truthfully don't know what I do know about it is what I included in the post. What do you mean by you don't think they're all centerfire?
 

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Actually, I said that I DO think that all the 8mm blanks are centerfire. Open your gun, remove the cylinder and look at the firing pin location. If it would align with the center of the chambers then it's a centerfire. If it's offset near a chamber edge, then it's a rimfire. I think that your gun is a 32 rimfire but I could be wrong. If it's centerfire, I'd think that 8mm blanks may work. It may depend on how tight the chambers are.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
It aligns with the chambers center, so where should I get the 8mm blanks for this and should I be scared to fire this considering the fact it is over 130 years old.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Another question how much do you think its worth? And by the way thanks for the quick helpful informational reply's, I appreciate it!
 

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I found this interesting - Information on Marlin Revolver - Marlin Firearms Collectors Association
Postby Regnier (gunrunner) » Fri Jul 22, 2005 5:04 pm
Vicky;

By now, you have figured out that this gun could not have been used in the Civil War from the patent dates. Since the patent date is July 1, 1873, and the war ended in 1865, it was not around to be used in the war.

The Marlin No. 32 Standard of 1875 was made from 1875 to 1887. It was a .32 Colt rimfire caliber. There are two versions of the 32 Standard, a long cylinder and a short cylinder. The long cylinder could handle the .32 long or short cartridge while the short cylinder could only handle the short cartridge. The cylinder of the long measures 1 3/16 inch in length while the short cylinder is only 7/8's of an inch in length. The material used on the grips is hard rubber ( a form of early plastic) and should have MFA Co. at the top of the grip or a "Star". If it has the MFA Co., the gun you have was made after 1881 when J. M. Marlin incorporated his company into the Marlin Fire-Arms Company. If it has the "Star", then it should have been made prior to 1881.
Estimated production of the 32 Standard will be around the 20,000 or so made. There are no records of just how many were made, but from examples observed, there were somewhere in that range made.
If you have any other questions, post them here and someone will be glad to help.

I hope this helps.
 

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Ancient Gaseous Emanation
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks underdog and popeye. I appreciate it guys I believe why the gunsmith thinks it's worth more than $400 (because that's what he said) is because the shooting mechanism works extremely well. There is no star on the handle it says mfa co. but on the side of the barrel the gun says it was made July 1st 1878 and on the top the serial code states it's 1875 version.
 

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If you want to shoot it you can buy vintage 32 rimfire ammo. it will probably be expensive but i doubt you will be at the range shooting it like a new semi auto pistol. There are places online to buy it and gunshows usually have guys that sell old ammo. Most of it's sold for collecting but some guys do shoot it. Also i think someone remade some 32 rimfire ammo some years back. Not sure which company but you may be able to find some of that as well. Not sure about the newer remade stuff but the old ammo will be black powder and you must clean the gun thoroughly after shooting or it will be a rusty mess before long. There are several different types of 32 rimfire ammo so if you do decide to get some make sure you get the right ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Alright square target thanks very much and 1 more last question, I'm thinking about purchasing this but I want to practice with blanks. Is there a place to buy .44 cal blanks that will work with this item? Do the blanks have to be black powder? I found these but I don't know if they will work with the item. Thanks a lot.


Link to item: http://www.taylorsfirearms.com/hand...s-frame-44-7-1-2-octagonal-barrel-pietta.html


Link to blanks I found: http://www.atlanticwallblanks.com/44-40-BLANK-FULL-LOAD-SMOKE_p_82.html
 

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The link you posted for the pietta .44 is a cap and ball black powder gun. No cartridges, pour powder in the cylinder, seat the ball and put a cap on the nipples on the back of the cylinder. I own 3 different ones, very fun to shoot but time consuming to load and clean...and gain they must be cleaned after shooting because they are black powder.

Taylors does sell those olf type revolvers that do take cartridges though. http://www.taylorsfirearms.com/hand-guns/cartridge-revolvers/1858-remington-conversion.html
As far as blanks go i pretty much have zero experience with them. I do have a partial box of .22 blanks one of my shop teachers gave me in high school and shooting a few of those is my total experience.

 

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I suppose you could load it with just powder and felt patch or some other type of wad. I'm just trying to figure out why unless you plan on doing some sort of re-enactment?
 

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Well for that you can just use the caps and no powder or bullet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
What do you mean caps you mean like what are used in the toy guns? I wanted to try using blanks, someone who worked at a website that sold that exact gun I gave you the link to said I can fire blanks out of that he just didn't know what blanks. I figured the .44 cal blanks I found on a website would work I just don't know if they need to be black powder blanks or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I wasn't going to put in black powder with the blanks I was wondering if the black powder is already in the blank so I can just load the blank into the gun and fire the blank without worrying about anything.
 

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The gun you are showing (the pietta) does not take cartridges(ammo, rounds etc) You load all the components(powder, balls and caps) individually right into the revolver cylinder. Watch this video to see.

 
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