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Ancient Gaseous Emanation
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NEIL MUNRO
3 Sep 2019


Middle-class wages in progressive California have risen by 1 percent in the last 40 years, says a study by the establishment California Budget and Policy Center.

“Earnings for California’s workers at the low end and middle of the wage scale have generally declined or stagnated for decades,” says the report, titled “California’s Workers Are Increasingly Locked Out of the State’s Prosperity.” The report continued:

In 2018, the median hourly earnings for workers ages 25 to 64 was $21.79, just 1% higher than in 1979, after adjusting for inflation ($21.50, in 2018 dollars) (Figure 1). Inflation-adjusted hourly earnings for low-wage workers, those at the 10th percentile, increased only slightly more, by 4%, from $10.71 in 1979 to $11.12 in 2018.​

The report admits that the state’s progressive economy is delivering more to investors and less to wage-earners. “Since 2001, the share of state private-sector [annual new income] that has gone to worker compensation has fallen by 5.6 percentage points – from 52.9% to 47.3%.”

In 2016, California’s Gross Domestic Product was $2.6 trillion, so the 5.6 percent drop shifted $146 billion away from wages. That is roughly $3,625 per person in 2016.

The report notes that wages finally exceeded 1979 levels around 2017, and it splits the credit between the Democrats’ minimum-wage boosts and President Donald Trump’s go-go economy.

The 40 years of flat wages are partly hidden by a wave of new products and services. They include almost-free entertainment and information on the Internet, cheap imported coffee in supermarkets, and reliable, low-pollution autos in garages.

But the impact of California’s flat wages is made worse by California’s rising housing costs, the report says, even though it also ignores the rent-spiking impact of the establishment’s pro-immigration policies:

In just the last decade alone, the increase in the typical household’s rent far outpaced the rise in the typical full-time worker’s annual earnings, suggesting that working families and individuals are finding it increasingly difficult to make ends meet. In fact, the basic cost of living in many parts of the state is more than many single individuals or families can expect to earn, even if all adults are working full-time.

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Specifically, inflation-adjusted median household rent rose by 16% between 2006 and 2017, while inflation-adjusted median annual earnings for individuals working at least 35 hours per week and 50 weeks per year rose by just 2%, according to a Budget Center analysis of US Census Bureau, American Community Survey data.​



The wage and housing problems are made worse – especially for families – by the loss of employment benefits as companies and investors spike stock prices by cutting costs. The report says:

Many workers are being paid little more today than workers were in 1979 even as worker productivity has risen. Fewer employees have access to retirement plans sponsored by their employers, leaving individual workers on their own to stretch limited dollars and resources to plan how they’ll spend their later years affording the high cost of living and health care in California. And as union representation has declined, most workers today cannot negotiate collectively for better working conditions, higher pay, and benefits, such as retirement and health care, like their parents and grandparents did. On top of all this, workers who take on contingent and independent work (often referred to as “gig work”), which in many cases appears to be motivated by the need to supplement their primary job or fill gaps in their employment, are rarely granted the same rights and legal protections as traditional employees.​

The center’s report tries to blame the four-decade stretch of flat wages on the declining clout of unions. But unions’ decline was impacted by the bipartisan elites’ policy of mass-migration and imposed diversity.

In 2018, Breitbart reported how Progressives for Immigration Reform interviewed Blaine Taylor, a union carpenter, about the economic impact of migration:

TAYLOR: If I hired a framer to do a small addition [in 1988], his wage would have been $45 an hour. That was the minimum for a framing contractor, a good carpenter. For a helper, it was about $25 an hour, for a master who could run a complete job, it was about $45 an hour. That was the going wage for plumbers as well. His helpers typically got $25 an hour.

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Now, the average wage in Los Angeles for construction workers is less than $11 an hour. They can’t go lower than the minimum wage. And much of that, if they’re not being paid by the hour at less than $11 an hour, they’re being paid per piece – per piece of plywood that’s installed, per piece of drywall that’s installed. Now, the subcontractor can circumvent paying them as an hourly wage and are now being paid by 1099, which means that no taxes are being taken out.​

Diversity also damaged the unions by shredding California’s civic solidarity. In 2007, the progressive Southern Poverty Law Center posted a report with the title “Latino Gang Members in Southern California are Terrorizing and Killing Blacks.” In the same year, an op-ed in the Los Angeles Times described another murder by Latino gangs as “a manifestation of an increasingly common trend: Latino ethnic cleansing of African Americans from multiracial neighborhoods.”

The center’s board members include the executive director of the state’s SEIU union, a professor from the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley, and the research director at the “Program for Environmental and Regional Equity” at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles.

Outside California, President Donald Trump’s low-immigration policies are pressuring employers to raise Americans’ wages in a hot economy. The Wall Street Journal reportedAugust 29:

Overall, median weekly earnings rose 5% from the fourth quarter of 2017 to the same quarter in 2018, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. For workers between the ages of 25 and 34, that increase was 7.6%.​





https://www.breitbart.com/politics/...-middle-class-wages-rise-1-percent-40-years/#
 
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"But the impact of California’s flat wages is made worse by California’s rising housing costs, the report says, even though it also ignores the rent-spiking impact of the establishment’s pro-immigration policies:

In just the last decade alone, the increase in the typical household’s rent far outpaced the rise in the typical full-time worker’s annual earnings, suggesting that working families and individuals are finding it increasingly difficult to make ends meet. In fact, the basic cost of living in many parts of the state is more than many single individuals or families can expect to earn, even if all adults are working full-time."

When enough people cannot afford to live where they were born or where they moved to live, then watch the social unrest and fireworks. BUT....state government and county/city employees will be alright due to contracts that boost Cost Of Living Allowances for only them......fortunately.

It's the "private sector" that will die off. You know, the people whose taxes pay the state, county and city employees.
 

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I am a contractor/home builder. About 15 years ago I would hire illegals on a day basis. It was good labor at a good price. After a while I realized that this was hurting everyone but me. I came to the feeling that this unfair to lower skilled workers who really want to work. I can’t blame anyone for hiring these guys because there’s so few kids going into the business anymore but by hiring these illegal workers, it keeps more of our citizens from going into construction. I no longer will hire illegals. Haven’t for years but it’s damn hard to get an American who wants to work. They’ve been brainwashed into thinking they need to go to college to earn a good living yet college isn’t for everyone. They’ve never even mowed a lawn.

My competitors make it hard for me to compete because of the labor rate difference. They make it hard for me to compete when bidding on a job. I pay a know nothing laborer $10. an hour to clean up the job. Way above minimum wage. My top carpenter gets $62. an hour. My second year carpenter gets $18. Per hour. Basically I have to take a pay cut to hire Americans but I’m not looking over my shoulder and I can insure them if they get hurt. I sleep better at night.
 

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I am a contractor/home builder. About 15 years ago I would hire illegals on a day basis. It was good labor at a good price. After a while I realized that this was hurting everyone but me. I came to the feeling that this unfair to lower skilled workers who really want to work. I can’t blame anyone for hiring these guys because there’s so few kids going into the business anymore but by hiring these illegal workers, it keeps more of our citizens from going into construction. I no longer will hire illegals. Haven’t for years but it’s damn hard to get an American who wants to work. They’ve been brainwashed into thinking they need to go to college to earn a good living yet college isn’t for everyone. They’ve never even mowed a lawn.

My competitors make it hard for me to compete because of the labor rate difference. They make it hard for me to compete when bidding on a job. I pay a know nothing laborer $10. an hour to clean up the job. Way above minimum wage. My top carpenter gets $62. an hour. My second year carpenter gets $18. Per hour. Basically I have to take a pay cut to hire Americans but I’m not looking over my shoulder and I can insure them if they get hurt. I sleep better at night.
I would rather do business with a company like yours and pay a bit more for the job knowing that legal American workers were doing the job.
Just like I am willing to pay more for a product made in the USA than for something cheaper made in Asia.
Wish everyone would buy and support American labor and products.
Thank you for doing the right thing.
 

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Try getting Americans to do roofing here in the South; I have lived in the South now over 16 years and the only white American was the super who never climbed on the roof; all the rest were Mexicans. When asked why as they were doing my roof, his response was simple - they WANT to work and they will do the jobs no one else wants to do. Same for the contractors mowing the highways. They have folks who walk 10-15 miles a day with trimmers working alongside the road.
 

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"I would rather do business with a company like yours and pay a bit more for the job knowing that legal American workers were doing the job"

Very commendable! But the reality is that you are in the minority, the majority of USA citizens will only hire the cheapest company and contribute to the problem, if every citizen were to ask the contractor for a document that guarantees that all worker are legal residents, the problem would stop overnight.
 

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I don't see the problem. The report is inflation adjusted so they're saying over and above inflation, the wages have gone up 1%. There should be no expectation that wages go up other than for inflation. If you want your personal wages to go up then get new skills. Sell them for more money than your old skills. It's like comparing weather to climate. There's big picture and individual picture.
 

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Try getting Americans to do roofing here in the South; I have lived in the South now over 16 years and the only white American was the super who never climbed on the roof; all the rest were Mexicans. When asked why as they were doing my roof, his response was simple - they WANT to work and they will do the jobs no one else wants to do. Same for the contractors mowing the highways. They have folks who walk 10-15 miles a day with trimmers working alongside the road.
Two of the three biggest lies in the world are, "the check is in the mail" and "I'll respect you in the morning" I forget the third... :)

The "jobs Americans won't do" argument is the 4th. It is absolutely never, ever, ever, that Americans won't do a job. It is always that Mexicans, especially those here illegally, will do it for less money than Americans will do it for. For 2 centuries, Americans did those jobs that illegal immigrants are doing now. American employers, the Chamber of Commerce, and the Republican Party have figured out that illegal immigrants will do the work for less and that is why Mexicans are doing the roofing and mowing.

There's also the component that we pay Americans more money to not work than employers pay illegal immigrants to do the work. If you remove all government handouts I can guarantee you that Americans will be out their looking for that work in a heartbeat...
 

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"I would rather do business with a company like yours and pay a bit more for the job knowing that legal American workers were doing the job"

Very commendable! But the reality is that you are in the minority, the majority of USA citizens will only hire the cheapest company and contribute to the problem, if every citizen were to ask the contractor for a document that guarantees that all worker are legal residents, the problem would stop overnight.
eVerify would stop it overnight. You'll never see that become mandatory.

There are actually very simple solutions to most all of America's problems except for one: Politicians that sell their souls for campaign donations.
 

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Quite simply, when I was transferred to Kalifornia in 1992, the "remodeling/rebuilding" craze was in full swing. The Drywall union workers had been so undercut by Illegal Immigrant laborers that the drywall installers ceased to exist as an American/Kalifornia labor position by 1994. So, the Illegals put Americans out of work and as the interview discloses, the Illegals in turn then undercut the first bunch of Illegal Laborers. Making today less than "Min Wage"?

Oh yeah. Sanctuary status is really working for someone. But not for Americans and even the earliest Illegals. As the interviewer remarked, "The idea of skilled positions being taught in the construction trades is pretty much a done thing. No more."
 

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Two of the three biggest lies in the world are, "the check is in the mail" and "I'll respect you in the morning" I forget the third... :)

The "jobs Americans won't do" argument is the 4th. It is absolutely never, ever, ever, that Americans won't do a job. It is always that Mexicans, especially those here illegally, will do it for less money than Americans will do it for. For 2 centuries, Americans did those jobs that illegal immigrants are doing now. American employers, the Chamber of Commerce, and the Republican Party have figured out that illegal immigrants will do the work for less and that is why Mexicans are doing the roofing and mowing.

There's also the component that we pay Americans more money to not work than employers pay illegal immigrants to do the work. If you remove all government handouts I can guarantee you that Americans will be out their looking for that work in a heartbeat...
Once the entitlements got so good, you CAN'T get unemployed welfare recipients to do hard manual labor - about the only they have the ability to do. Why bust your ass when you get paid to stay home, screw and do drugs?
 
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