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Last Stand on Earth
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I ran 2 tests with Bullseye. Both from a 5" S&W 1911. Results are below.

6.2gr Bullseye, 185gr Berry's CPRN bullets

Round 1: 923 fps
Round 2: 992 fps
Round 3: 983 fps

Round 4: 937 fps
Round 5: 981 fps
Round 6: 975 fps

The first group was a little tighter in velocity than the first. These are hand measured. Is this usual with this powder in 45? That's a 70 fps spread in 6 shots.

I find the statement on the website amusing since it states, "Unsurpassed for 45 ACP target loads."
 

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Phil, I'm too lazy to go look in my Lyman manual, but 6.5 gr of Bullseye seems a bit hot for a cast bullet, which is essentially what a cooper plated bullet is. If I recall, target loads for a 1911 are in the 4 - 4.5 -5 range with 5.5 being about max. I most certainly could be wrong.

Also, when you get to playing around with low pressure and high pressure loads in the same 1911 you may experience some cycling issues. The lower loads needing a lighter spring and the heavier loads a heavier one to function properly and not cause damage or other unpleasantries by using the wrong spring.

I'll go check my book in a bit.

Alan
 

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Well, I looked, like I always do before I rely on my memory.... and, I am extremely happy to report that my memory in this regard is ginning just fine.

In two books the max loading for 185 cast bullets (granted all cast bullets are not created equal), showed 5.5 gr Bullseye. The max for any cast bullet of any weight in those two Lyman books was 6.1 gr Bullseye.

Now, is .7 gr over load too much? Maybe not, but for me it is. Bullseye is a funny little powder and things can go from hot to TOO damn hot in a very short time. Repeated shooting of hot loads in a 1911 and the repeated slamming of the slide back into the frame can cause some irreparable damage.

In all my years of reloading I have only put bullets through a Chronograph one time and that was only because the guy I was shooting with had one. I've never had any use for knowing how fast the bullet was going. My concern was focused on where it was going. The loads that produce the best accuracy are normally those mid range loads. There are exceptions but not many.

Target loads for the 1911 are traditionally on the light side. Even a manly man is going to develop a flinch after 1000s upon 1000s of full throttle 45 ACP. The lighter loads with a light spring will produce exceptional accuracy if you do your part. And, they are fun to shoot.

Alan
 

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Last Stand on Earth
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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Appreciate the feedback. I generally use xtp data when copper plated isn’t available. Reason being is the loads are usually a lower charge than copper or lead. In this case, I’m showing 6.4gr of Bullseye. I’ve yet to see leading in the barrels which means they are staying in tact. They are rated at 1250 FPS.

I won’t load 45 under an average of 330 lbs of energy produced, for the reasons you mentioned above about the spring weight. I have 9x 45 ACP handguns they need to function in.

A 185gr bullet moving at 900 will generate ~330 lbs of energy. A military spec 45 ball is 230gr moving at 850 (369 lbs of energy) Using that baseline, I should be able to push a 185 to 950 or ~371 lbs without issue. I would expect my 1911 to be able to handle that. I “shouldn’t” have to modify it to operate at those speeds. That’s my objective opinion and not a factual statement. That said, you can feel the difference between 920 and 990. When I approach that 1000 FPS mark I can feel the slide bottom. 900-950 would be the sweet spot in my opinion. A slightly heavier spring may not be a bad idea.

What I saw with TiteGroup was high pressure and sub par velocity. What I saw with Bullseye was on par but erratic pressure. As you mentioned, the pressure curve seems sharp towards the top. What I’ll do tomorrow is back it off a hair and see if I can get stable pressure. As long as these 185’s are hovering around 900 FPS, I’ll move forward.

The Unique loads I have for 185gr are extremely stable but also extremely hot at 1150 FPS and 540+ lbs of energy. They are however in the normal pressure range. I reserved those for my Blackhawks.
 

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Last Stand on Earth
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Think I’m going to dial in at 5.9gr. with the few FPS drop per .1gr, 5.8 - 6.0 should be just fine. The sharpness in the recoil seems to soften between 960-970 FPS.

6.1gr Bullseye
976
956
931

6.0gr Bullseye
908
964
950

5.9gr Bullseye
903
957
928
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, there’s the first 1,000. Only took about 3 hrs. Surprisingly smooth. All except 2 measured 5.9gr. The other 2 were 6.0gr. Bullet seater only creeped 0.002 the whole run.

122816
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I’m down to about 350 to prep, prime and load. I loaded around 1,500 on a work day. 3 boxes of 500. That’s usually a weekend thing. I was sure I had 2,000 when I counted brass the other night. Maybe I misplaced a bag of 45 brass... I know there’s some in the tumbler but I don’t think there’s 150 in there. Put a dent in that Bullseye jug though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Now I remember why I was going to post the above... I did run out of Winchester Large Pistol primers as expected. I had some CCI Large Pistol Magnum that I retested with the load. The numbers were so close to what I posted earlier it was like deja vu (within 2 FPS).
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Geez, I can’t believe it’s been 3 months since I loaded 45 ACP. Got another batch in the works and 1,000 bullets on hand. So far, these loads work well. Seems like I’ve barely made a dent in this 8lb Bullseye jug.

125547
 

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Looks like RCBS has them in stock.
 
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