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Hello all.

I managed to successfully and safely remove all the lead plates from a discarded automobile battery, and separated them from the cardboard dividers. I let all the parts dry after I neutralized them and what little acid was left over in baking soda and water. I am left with plates that appear to be two different types. Neither one will melt for beans using methods I have been using for years. Open fire, propane grill, or Melting Pot. What am I missing? Thanks.
 

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Don't use battery lead! Even though you think you neutralized it after soaking in acid for years it's embedded into the plates and will give off deadly fumes.
As far as it not melting i don't know that answer except maybe it's alloyed with some other metal with a higher melting point than lead.
 

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i did the youtube search.....there is a lot of different things there with the lead......

part one video is tearing the battery down and neutralizing acid.....

part 2 video is extracting concentrated sulfuric acid for later usage and then extracting lead.....and then extracting more of a pure lead.

part one.....................

 

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personally, i do not think it is worth the trouble unless you have a whole bunch of old batteries laying around.....those old car batteries will sell usually for aorund 5 to 10 bucks each and you can buy lead instead of extracting it.

but there is only one way to find out if its worth the time, trouble, and expense.....

i am lazy however....
 

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Hmm. Thanks for posting the video. I saw a similar one, but not that one. It appears I may have gotten similar to the amount that they did, but I don't have access to a propane torch. Being that they had mini muffin molds, and I have muffin molds, I think I got about a handful, but not quite as much as they did. Either way, I don't think I will do it again. :) there is a place near me where I can buy lead for a dollar a pound. Granted it is soft, mostly Roofing lead, but I am far from professional shooter, and it suits my needs. I got the battery for free, so all I wasted was a bunch of time, effort, and a little Propane and firewood.
 

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Wheel weights. Most tire stores will give you the old ones that they take off. It’s generally a bit harder than roof or plumbing lead.
 

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Buy lead from the scrap yard for a buck a pound. Far easier, cheaper and less risky.

Like Stamps said, you can get wheel weights from tire shops from time to time, but you have to sort out the zinc before melting anything down.

Battery lead is not a good way to go, at best, and can be downright dangerous.

--Wag--
 
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Discussion Starter #9
I have heard that wheel weights are a good source, but most of my local shops have a contract with somebody to pick up their lead. Maybe I will try a couple of the mom and pop shops around, but all the big names seem to have it tied up.
 

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I talked to my brother about the battery lead. He used to be a grid caster at Deka battery. He said they are an alloy. And the pots were at 1300 degrees.
 

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I had a stack of old vehicle batteries. I piled a bunch of wood and scrap lumber around it, then some more and some more... finally got all the plastic burned off and The amount of leadish stuff wasn’t worth the time and trouble. The core charge on batteries these days will buy about 15 pounds of lead.

Alan
 
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Like other said wheel weights are a good source but depending on what state you live in they may be outlawed already. Best bet like someone else said is a scrap yard which will usually charge you a few cents more per pound than they pay and the price can fluctuate a little depending on the market. Wheel weights are usually hard enough for most pistol round as long as you keep the speed to a minimum. If you get scrap yard lead it could be anything so getting a lead hardness tester might be a safe bet. If you get soft lead you can mix it with linotype or super hard lead that can be bought at a place called rotometals to make real nice bullet alloys. Sometimes you can even find linotype at scrap yards as well.
 

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I was always given the advice not to use battery lead and will follow it. Pure lead is dangerous enough no need to add more potential danger.
 

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I "reading" of most literature regarding bullet-casting will deal with lead "sources". Batteries and zinc wheel weights are not considered "sources", at all!
 

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Alter Hurricane Harvey all the roofs in the neighborhood were replaced. I gave the jefe’ that did ours a twenty and asked him to bring me all the roof vent lead he could. He dropped off at least a couple hundred dollars worth in the front yard over the next month.

I use pure lead in ml and c&b pistol and just save the rest. I’ve got plenty of other alloy to use for mill run bullets.

I’ve loaded 8x57 170s had checked pure Linotype bullets to over 2000 FPS and retained accuracy with no leading.

Alan
 

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Years ago my father in law was a pressman for the Chicago Sun Times and he would bring me lead from the printing press. I would take that and plumbing lead from my construction job and my friend would mix the two and give me reloads for my .357 for free. Good deal all the way around.
 

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Years ago my father in law was a pressman for the Chicago Sun Times and he would bring me lead from the printing press. I would take that and plumbing lead from my construction job and my friend would mix the two and give me reloads for my .357 for free. Good deal all the way around.
That printing press lead is linotype, works great for faster high pressure loads like 44 mag and rifle. I've gotten some from my scrapyard before and they just treat it as lead price wise. I also found half a 5 gallon bucket there once with cast bullets. it was from someone who passed away and the family scrapped it. I just re cast them into my own. I'm getting a little low myself and need to stop in and see what they have in the next few weeks plus buy some superhard to mix up some alloy.
 

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Since O-hole scrapped (pun intended) the only lead smelter facility in the United States, battery manufacturers have been using alternatives to lead-acid components in their products. Most now use either a lead-calcium-silver alloy or a lead-calcium alloy, instead of the previous lead-antimony alloy compound. Have you noticed that the price of auto-batteries have doubled/tripled in price? This is why.
 

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I talked to my brother about the battery lead. He used to be a grid caster at Deka battery. He said they are an alloy. And the pots were at 1300 degrees.
I always heard there are only 3 car battery manufacturers: Johnson Controls, Exide and Delco. Maybe major manufacturers that make most of the batteries? Or maybe my understanding is incorrect.
 

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I check prices on stuff sometimes out of curiosity to see where things are. I think a #2 alloy, around 16 BHN, cost less than 5 bucks a pound.
 
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