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Jockey On Ya Back
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i was told in another section (after i went through heavy detail on what i actually wanted) that i need to "start small". that's fine but my actual question wasn't answered, but i'm not here for that, i'm here for the "start small" part.

first: can i get all the small rimfire cartridges that are still common/mass produced etc.
(.22 and .17 right?) listed in order from most powerful to least?

basically i need a list of the top 10 sub $350 .22 rifles in order from best to worst that has at least a 5 round detachable magazine and is bolt action or semi auto. i'd also like to know what the next logical step would be from .22, and how long it would take approximately before i'm ready to use something like a asked for in my other thread (i'd also like the question i asked to be answered, instead of ignoring it and just saying "forget that now, get a .22") so here is the link to that.
http://http://www.nationalgunforum.com/general-gun-discussion/36288-introduction-some-questions.html
 

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You sound just like those kids you refer to in that thread. No one rifle is good for all, everyone has their likes and dislikes about each. YOU need to find this out for yourself because what we might say are good rifles you may not like. Look to Ruger, Marlin, Savage, and CZ for some good 22LR rifles. Don't leave out the tube feed rifles, they are very good rifles. No one can tell you how long to stay with a rifle or when you will be good at shooting it. Again this is all up to you and how much practice and time you put into it, this is not a video game - this is life.
 

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You sound much like I did when I started getting into guns, but I've learned a lot since then.

The 22 lr is a great cartridge to start with, as it gives you a ton of practice aiming down sights and getting on target before pulling the trigger. Also, how you're pulling the trigger, your stance, what you're doing as you're pulling the trigger, and even the follow through you have on your trigger pulls. It's also a great place to start practicing your breathing.

My recommendation would be a Ruger 10/22. It takes detachable magazines, you can accessorize it with little difficulty, and they're very high quality. Perfect rifles to start with, and will prepare you for you were you looking for in the other thread. A Designated Marksmen Rifle is what you were asking for on the other profile from the sounds of it. A Semi-auto rifle that fires accurately out to about 500 yards, with a lethal range of much much further. However, these rifles are much harder to get and are anywhere from $.70 to $1.00 a round. Which is steep.

Get a Ruger 10/22 for now. It's where I would have started had I asked for advice. Instead I started with a 12 Gauge and moved to a Cetme, chambered in 308. The rifle was a piece of crap because the previous owner never cleaned it, and the ammo was anywhere from $1 to $2.

Even now, I really wish I had a Ruger 10/22. Magazines are small to large size, and they're fairly accessible. Ammo is also only about $.20 a round right now... and people are saying that's really expensive. So that's probably going to go down in no time.

As an added beneit, if you dislike the looks of your Ruger 10/22 out of the box, they sell entirely built stocks that give your Ruger the look of an AR or you know... Red Jacket Firearms - Sons of Guns - Red Jacket ZK-22 Bullpup Stock

That.

Enjoy!
 

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Spent some time at the range today helping the wife sight in her new scope on her savage mark II. we both managed easy 1 MOA's and a few sub 1"MOA's at 100 and 150 yards. So I would have no problem recomending one.


The cost of 400 rounds of ammo for a 22 is 20 to 30 bucks at best a 20 round box of 223 is 8.50 do the math. At 8.50 a box the cost of 400 rounds of 223 is $170.00 that will actually cover the cost of the brand New Savage II we got for the wife.
 

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From your other thread:

anyway, i see everyone replying says to get a .22 rifle to start with. but i just personally don't see .22 as a respectable, useful cartridge. i know all guns are dangerous, even toy guns, but a .22 from what i've seen is too low powered, and too small. should i perhaps start with a 9mm or .45 ACP rifle because of this? or is the .22 actually not as bad as i think.
Respect does not come from the cartridge size or the rifle or the gear you haul to the range. Respect comes from knowing how to shoot.

And it is the ONLY thing that generates respect.

You can lose respect by being a moron and I'm not saying you are (!) only that if you can shoot well, but you're an ass and can't hold to safety protocols, you still won't have respect.

I hope that's clear.

Having said that, the reason people suggest that you get a 10/22 or a bolt action .22 rifle is because you can EASILY learn to shoot. You will need instruction in the process so go find it but with a .22, you can shoot 400 rounds for $30 or $40 and shoot all day long, learning the whole time.

If you shoot a 30-06, for example, you'll shoot 40 rounds, your shoulder and arm will be killing you, it will cost you $100 or so and you'll learn a lot of bad habits that you will spend a lifetime "fixing."

The problem with the 9mm and .45acp carbine rifles is that they have a tendency to be somewhat inaccurate and you'll find yourself getting frustrated while trying to learn to shoot with it. Don't get me wrong, you can shoot the rifle just fine if you already know how to shoot. It's a key point which really applies to most other rifles.

If you want to learn to shoot (and be respected) get someone to teach you on a 10/22 and spend a year or so with it. If you prefer to be a wanna-be wasting your money on useless gear, get whatever you want. We won't be able to you help you shoot well if you do that, though.

Good luck!

--Wag--
 

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^^^^^^^^^ What he said^^^^^^^^^ You sound like you have a lot of misconceptions about firearms. Not to put you down in any way, but it does not take but a few seconds with an inexperienced person for it to show. Inexperience is OK, we were all like that one day. Firearms cover a broad spectrum. Listen, watch and learn---take it slow.
 
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