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Discussion Starter #1
Traded my old Japanese Arisaka type 99 (Poor Condition) for this a year or 2 ago... Came with the En Blocs and all the numbers on the gun match to each other except the bolt... Oddly enough the numbers on the bolt are only 7 digits off the numbers on the gun. Same platoon and got the bolts switched up when the soldiers were cleaning them possibly?
 

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Bolt Mix-up or armory switched broken one...Nice rifle though either way I`d shoot it although not everyday or very long just a few rounds here there like say special occasion 2-3 rounds some of these returned and were like the Mosin Nagants and K-98 broken pieces were switched. Looks more like the Steyr M95. just awesome looking
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Are there different sizes of 8 millimeter Mauser? or can I just shoot standard 8 millimeter out of it?
 

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gewehr_1888

The maximum operating pressure for the Gewehr 88 commission rifle is less than that of any 8 mm Mauser rifle, as the makers of the Gewehr 88 did not fully understand the greater energy of smokeless powder compared to black powder. Shooters planning to use modern 8 mm ammunition in a Gewehr 88 slug their bore and chamber as there are four different possible bores and grooves and chamber dimensioning combinations found on the Gewehr 88 rifle. High performance and hence high pressure or military ammunition designated for machine gun use cannot be fired safely in a Gewehr 88 commission rifle
 

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The 8mm Mauser cartridge was created by the German military in 1888 and continued to be used through World War II. The cartridge has been modified slightly over the years, which has caused confusion when trying to determine which variety of 8mm Mauser ammo works for your rifle.

The original 8mm Mauser cartridge featured a .318 diameter projectile, and today you can find a .318 diameter projectile in any ammo marked as 8x57 JR. The “R” stands for rimmed, as all of the available 8mm Mauser ammunition with .318 diameter projectiles are loaded into a rimmed case.

The most common version of 8mm Mauser ammo is the 8x57mm JS which is a centerfire, rimless, bottle-necked, .323 caliber rifle cartridge. In 1905, the German Military increased the bullet diameter from .318 to .323. Any 8mm Mauser ammo with an “S” features a .323 caliber bullet. If you are looking for ammunition for your surplus 8mm Turkish Mauser or German Mauser K98, you are looking for 8x57mm JS.

One other variant of the 8mm Mauser is the 8x57 JRS. You guessed it, the “R” signifies that it has a rimmed cartridge, and the “S” signifies that it has a .323 caliber bullet. This ammo is mainly used in break-action double rifles and drilling rifles.

Most rifles chambered for 8mm Mauser were designed for the JS (rimless case and .323 caliber bullet), but make sure to check your rifle before buying to make sure you are purchasing the correct cartridge for your rifle!


https://www.luckygunner.com/rifle/:~:targetText=318 diameter projectiles are loaded,increased the bullet diameter from .
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the info. How does one go about "slugging" their barrel? Mine has the S stamped into the receiver above the crown, so based off of your link it should shoot the 8x57JS rounds
 

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Take a lead fishing weight, grease it and then insert it at the breech end and use a steel cleaning rod and hammer to drive it out the muzzle end. Ideally you should mount the gun in a vise-makes it easier to do this. Use your calipers to take a reading off the lands. Note: the Gew 88 and Kar 88 were originally chambered in 7.92x57, NOT 8mm MAUSER. There is a 0.005” difference in diameter between the two bullets. It’s not much of a difference but enough that you could blow a gun up because of a spike in pressure.

Basically, it is considered sound judgment when dealing with early German smokeless powder rifles to have the bore slugged. That way, you know what the actual diameter is, even if the S mark is stamped on the receiver. When you’re dealing with very old milsurp rifles, the smart collector/shooter does not assume anything related to the safety of their firearm.
 
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