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So, all of you out there who cast your own bullets know to never put wet lead into your melting pot, right? I knew that too. I did not know, however, that after drying for a couple days on an old towel on my Florida garage floor, my sinkers that came off a torn cast net would still have water in them. Just enough to cause a literal explosion. Lead literally went all over walls, ceilings, everything in its path. Miraculously, the only injury I sustained was some of the lead landed inside the wrist of my right leather glove, causing minor burns. I felt the lead whizz past my ears, but amazingly, none got on my safety glasses, my head or my face. It did however end up on both shoulders of my long sleeved T-shirt, and all over my Dickies work pants and sneakers. Wow, was I lucky. Not putting this on to get beat up by all you out there, just a cautionary tale from a ham and egger that's been reloading for 25 plus years, and made a stupid mistake. Please make extra sure your lead is super dry. Safe reloading, everyone.
 

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Grand Imperial Poobah
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Remember Murphy's Law, especially when working in a hazardous situation.

BTW, concrete is notorious for attracting and retaining moisture.
 
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For initial melting of scrounged lead, I put it in an old cast iron frying pan (Marked LEAD) and then heat to melting. Any water dries out of it during that process. I pour all of that off into ingots then refill with more scrounged stuff. I have an aluminum cornbread mold that I use for ingots and I keep the ingots inside, dry to add to the furnace. The furnace is in the shop and the initial melting is done outside.

I do all of this because of the scenario you described in the OP. A half drop of water expands to about 100X its size in an instant. Fortunately I wear glasses...

It's a good lesson to observe while frying turkeys too..... except with the turkey you don't have the luxury of heating it gradually. It HAS to be dry when it goes into the 375 degree oil...

Alan
 

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AZHerper
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So, all of you out there who cast your own bullets know to never put wet lead into your melting pot, right? I knew that too. I did not know, however, that after drying for a couple days on an old towel on my Florida garage floor, my sinkers that came off a torn cast net would still have water in them. Just enough to cause a literal explosion. Lead literally went all over walls, ceilings, everything in its path. Miraculously, the only injury I sustained was some of the lead landed inside the wrist of my right leather glove, causing minor burns. I felt the lead whizz past my ears, but amazingly, none got on my safety glasses, my head or my face. It did however end up on both shoulders of my long sleeved T-shirt, and all over my Dickies work pants and sneakers. Wow, was I lucky. Not putting this on to get beat up by all you out there, just a cautionary tale from a ham and egger that's been reloading for 25 plus years, and made a stupid mistake. Please make extra sure your lead is super dry. Safe reloading, everyone.
Glad that you're OK. Good cautionary note for those here that are still casting.
 

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I had a similar thing happen. I don't recall exactly how it happened now but i think i plucked a bad poured bullet out of the water(i water quench) and set it aside and at some point later forgot about it and put it back in the pot with the sprues.
Another time i was remelting a bunch of pulled hard cast bullets that i had saved in a tub under my loading bench. I live primer had made it's way into the bucket as well and also went into the pot. Pretty much did the same thing as a drop of water does but a little louder. Both times i was lucky and just had a couple of tiny splatters hit my arm while the majority of the lead splash went up and away from me.
 
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