National Gun Forum banner

101 - 120 of 127 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Very good read, thank you.
My wife took to shooting like a duck to water. She turned out to be a natural. Our first gun was a Glock 23 and she handles it so well I had to give it to her and get my own. I gave her a S&W 9mm for her birthday and she shoots the heck outta them targets with that too.
I just wish sh could make a pot roast that wasn't dry. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Great thread.


My first gun and carry gun is a Walther PK380. Most women I know can handle guns that I can't. I've never had strong hands. And, now I'm almost retirement age. So many guns I fall in love with at first site, I end up not being strong enough to rack.


I bought my first gun, my carry gun 2 years ago. I barely ever went to the range those first two years because I didn't want to go alone. I wanted someone there to watch and make sure I followed all the safety rules and develop good habits right off. I did manage to get one of my brothers to go with me a couple of times. But, he wasn't really into it.


Finally, I joined a couple of groups. A local women's group and a local (Texas) gun forum. I've gone from going to the range 3 times in 2 years to going to the range 10 times in the last 4 months.


The most fun is meeting all the guys from the forum at the range and getting to try all their guns. That's how I fell in love with 1911s. A little too big to conceal, but lots of fun at the range. And potentially a way to make my hands stronger for a 9mm carry gun later. Maybe, maybe not.


Surprisingly it turns out that I do enjoy practicing alone too. I do learn a lot just shooting by myself.


Thanks for the Cornered Cat link. I always forget about that website. I just found a great page with lots of info on minimizing lead exposure.


I really lucked out finding my PK380 when I did. Last time I met the guys at the range, I found out that someone's wife was having trouble with the recoil on her 380 (I'm not buying a Baby Rock after all). Her husband tried my PK380 and said the recoil was much more manageable.


So, if anyone's looking for a light recoil 380, the least recoil would be the PK380 or maybe the new EZ.


And, if a gun isn't pink, it can always be cerakoted, right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,369 Posts
I guess it depends on weather you want to interest your other in shooting, or in self defense. If it's the joy of hitting a target, a air pistol is a great way to get started. If self defense, I'd recommend a .357 revolver loaded with .38 special.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,370 Posts
For all of you GUYS who THINK you know what's best for your So, go read CorneredCat.com; then read it AGAIN with your SO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Lesson learned when my wife learned on my Beretta 92.
1. She needs to be able to load it on her own, the magazine I mean.
My wife was doing great, excited to learn (and deadly accurate for a first timer)
That is until she tried to load the mag on her own, that was when I saw that look of defeat on her face.
Luckily I did get a mag loader from RAE Industries and things were fine.

But... she wanted to carry it...
So. She was torn between the M&P Shield because of the popularity and the Ruger LCP, both 9mm.

Sure, the Ruger was available in this red cranberry color that she liked... But, the real deal breaker was how difficult the dang mag spring was to push down on the M&P Shield. The LCP however has a much lighter mag spring. So she opted for the LCP, Went back to RAE and got a loader for her LCP.
Win for Color option
Win for easy to load and use.

Sure, the LCP would stove pipe on cheap ammo like steel cased, but your standard 115g brass all worked great. Also,the fancy home defense stuff (I think 124grain?) works flawlessly.

Something to consider. :popcorn2:
Thanks everyone!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
The last gun I purchased for my wife was a Sig Sauer P238 in .380. I found that for her .380 was a good round. She was comfortable shooting it, little recoil and the slug is the same as a 9 mil, They call it a short 9 for a reason, But prior to purchase, I took her to a range and let her try one. we have indoor ranges here where you can rent the guns. I have another 380 that she loved to shoot, she never cared for the 9 mil and the 40 and 45 made her uncomfortable with the recoil. God forbid, I wouldn't even let her near the 44 mag. But she does love the 380 and is very proficient with it.Were we live the average police response is 10-15 minutes (or more if they are busy), SInce I travel a lot, I wanted her to have a gun to protect herself and our kids if needed. the 380 has enough stopping power in a close situation.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Popeye

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,370 Posts
Mine got a SIG P365 this Christmas (with extra 12 round mags); she likes it so much more than the G-26, the Glock will be going away
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Well, actually the military does in away, the 5.56/ .223 is a longer heavier gr 22.
6
yes, they do...but it's a different, center fire, bullet with much more propellant behind it. i have a 22-250 that will drive a 55 grain bullet at over 3000 fps...😉
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
So the other day I went to pick up my gun from the store there was a Husband and wife looking at guns for her trying to decide what would be good for her.
He decided to ask me being I was a woman and she wanted my opinion till they brought out the gun I was there to pick up my Smith and Wesson 500.
He wasn't sure anymore I would give her good advice but like I told them talk to your friends who have guns and if they go to a range go with them shoot different guns see what you like and feel comfortable with.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,658 Posts
If you’re married to a Italian or Columbian woman, never give her a bigger gun than you think you can survive a shot from. I keep the pellet pistol for her to use. I think I could take a few of those as a run away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
I disagree with the .22 advice. I think it is condescending to female shooters. I used to live five minutes from the NRA HQ Range. There was a grandmotherly type instructor there, who was an IDPA competitor and EDC'ed what looked like a 1911 race gun. I took a class from her and she said she could teach any woman how to safely, comfortably and accurately handle a 1911. She taught my wife basic pistol and while she did her main instruction with a G19, she had my wife shoot my 1911 for a couple of mags. My wife has weak hands, but she was fine with it.

I find the problem with people, male or female, with weak hands is slide rack and DA triggers. Recoil is not that big a deal. I competed with the 1911 in the military and you learn to "ride" the recoil. As long as you have a firm grip and don't limp wrist, you are fine. If you are using a lot of hand strength to handle recoil, you are doing it wrong.

I find that guys picking anything out for women are on a fool's errand. My local training academy has a course that I think is a great idea. The course is called, "Handgun Selection" and it is offered once a month. They have boatload of rental guns and they let people try them all out, with supervision. That is the way to do it. Let the little lady decide herself.

BTW, if I were to not take my own advice and bought a gun for a newbie shooter female with weak hands, it would be a Shield EZ. I rented one at the range and it was the easiest gun to load, rack and shoot I have handled. It is also accurate. I would stay away from micro guns for any beginner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,370 Posts
It osn't the recoil as much as the noise. Many women have more sensitive hearing and if the hearing protection is not that good, the noise tends to amplify the recoil effect - at least in their minds to them, and that is all that matters. I found with my wife - who is not gun shy - that plugs and muffs with metallic does a great job
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
It osn't the recoil as much as the noise. Many women have more sensitive hearing and if the hearing protection is not that good, the noise tends to amplify the recoil effect - at least in their minds to them, and that is all that matters. I found with my wife - who is not gun shy - that plugs and muffs with metallic does a great job
That's a good point. I'd say good hearing protection on the range, but don't worry about it for actual SD. I have read multiple accounts where defenders don't even remember noticing the noise when they shot. The brain tends to block it out when the adrenaline is high, just like it blocks out other kinds of pain.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,512 Posts
Training with a .22LR has very little to do with recoil although in some cases, it matters. Not everyone is the same, teacher or student.

Learning on a .22LR is a way of ensuring that proper technique and form are learned and to avoid developing bad habits and reflexes.

--Wag--
 
  • Like
Reactions: Speed

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,370 Posts
That's a good point. I'd say good hearing protection on the range, but don't worry about it for actual SD. I have read multiple accounts where defenders don't even remember noticing the noise when they shot. The brain tends to block it out when the adrenaline is high, just like it blocks out other kinds of pain.
Their brain may block the memory, but the open ear canal doesn't block the blast from causing hearing damage
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ziggidy

·
Jesus Saves
Joined
·
7,997 Posts
BTW, if I were to not take my own advice and bought a gun for a newbie shooter female with weak hands, it would be a Shield EZ. I rented one at the range and it was the easiest gun to load, rack and shoot I have handled. It is also accurate. I would stay away from micro guns for any beginner.
....IF I WERE.......it would be the 9mmEZ

I have learned the hard way...NEVER buy a gun for anyone else; especially a female.
 
101 - 120 of 127 Posts
Top