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Barrel leading mainly is caused, and can be alleivated, by adjusting two two things: Projectile hardness and projectile speed. The harder the projectile, the faster it can be pushed.
^^^ This.........

I'll also add proper bullet size to the bore. Cast bullets should be .001 bigger than the bore diameter. If they are smaller gasses can get between the bullet and bore causing leading also. This isn't usually such a big deal on modern guns because they are usually consistent.
^^^ ...and this...

Also not sure if anyone mentioned it but linotype is just a type of lead made to a certain hardness. It has it's name because it's what's used in linotype machine which are a type of printing press. If you ever come across lead in thin strips with letters, numbers or words on the edge that's linotype. it's suitable for all magnum pistol and rifle cast bullets. It's around 22 BHN.
...also this, However, it's unlikely that the boolit is made from pure linotype. It's just "too hard" if that's even a good way to say it! ;-)

Regarding cast lead, I would think if the bullets are decent hardness and right diameter you can push em pretty hard. I pushed cast bullets pretty hard in 44 Mag and .45 Colt without any leading using H110. Great hunting loads.
^^^ Summed up nicely. There are plenty of casters who make lead rounds for rifles and push them at typical rifle speeds without leading up their barrels. I think that if you're shooting lead boolits, you should definitely check the barrel after a couple hundred rounds to see if you have leading. Or check after every 20 rounds. whatever makes you more comfortable.

Also, shooting jacketed rounds behind lead rounds does NOT "clean" lead out of your barrels. It mostly just packs it into the grooves even more tightly and makes it harder to clean out.

You mentioned using gas checks which is a pretty good idea if you want that last bit of extra insurance. It can help if you simply can't get everything else just right and accuracy or leading is still an issue for a particular firearm.

Note that a good, correct lube or in some cases, a good coating is a critical point as well.

Back to the hardness of the bullet. They can be TOO hard, depending on the myriad of other details. If the boolit is too hard, it won't obturate completely in the barrel and can allow gases to get past the boolit and, of course, create leading. Sometimes, a softer boolit (of the correct diameter) is going to perform better at many points.

Regardless, the right combination of factors is needed:

  • Proper size. Most critical
  • Proper hardness
  • Proper velocity
  • Proper lubrication

Keep this in context. Without it, that list sounds like advice to a young man on his wedding night. :)

--Wag--
 

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Just one thing to add about gas checks. You can't just slap them on any bullet, the bullet has to be designed for them and has a step at the base where they are installed. You can shoot gas check bullets without gas checks too. I have only done this with one type of bullet and had poor results. They were 500 gr 45-70 bullets and i have major key holing at 50-100yds. They may perform better with smaller bullets or at different speeds, i just haven't experimented with it.
 
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AZHerper
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The load data from Hodgdon seems a bit hot by your notes.

View attachment 123869

Even at their low end it’s generating over 1,000 ft lbs.

View attachment 123870

Add about 300fps from a 20” barrel and those will be screaming coming out of that Henry. Somewhere to to the tune of 1450 ft lbs. That’s spicy.
All I know is that I got case separation (after 2 or 3 reloads) in my TC Contender at levels less than their listed max of 22 gr. A load of 20.5 was OK in the Model 57.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
I tested the 3 different bullets with H110 @20gr. Both the hard cast and the lino bullets performed phenomenally well.

215gr hard cast semi-wadcutters
1675 fps (1339 ft lbs)
1698 fps (1376 ft lbs)

210gr lino semi-wadcutters
1701 fps (1349 ft lbs)
1707 fps (1359 ft lbs)

The 215gr JHCs were not so consistent
1485 fps (first shot fired from this gun)
1622 fps

All of the charges we measured with the powder trickler. I’ll test the JHC again at another time. Right now it seems I have a decent load. I’ll test accuracy tomorrow. The JHC were fired first, followed by hard cast, then lino bullets. I did not see any evidence of lead from the 4 lead bullets. I did see a small amount of powder debris (either carbon or unburnt powder) but not much.

On a side note, I’ve always used a factory crimp die. Not fond of seater/crimp die combo but it didn’t do bad with these. Just have to be conservative on the crimp compared to my usual heavy crimp.
 

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On a side note, I’ve always used a factory crimp die. Not fond of seater/crimp die combo but it didn’t do bad with these. Just have to be conservative on the crimp compared to my usual heavy crimp.
I prefer a LFC die as well but seater/crimp dies work great. The problems people run into is not having their brass a consistent length and crushing cases. Being i never bother to check my straight wall cases because they usually don't change or change much i will occasionally wrinkle one. The downfall of a LFC die is the extra step but to me it's not big deal, i have extra steps most people don't do anyway.
 
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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Yep, I prefer the extra step. More control. It did force me to learn to use the combo die. I can still get a firm crimp with cannelure bullets using a full turn final adjustment. Just have to hit the cannelure just right. I don’t know that this will work with non cannelure bullets like the plated ones I use all the time. I suspect it would scrap the plating off during the seating.

Two of the semi-wadcutters got jammed while testing. I wrote this off as breakin. I’m sureit’ll smooth out like the others. If I recall, the 357 did that for a little while when I first got it. That one functions fine now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I don’t know if it’s the bullets sticking to the inside of the dies or what but I have a variance between 1.652” and 1.707”. The seating is not uniform in any fashion.

I am loading on a single stage and making sure the bullets are straight when seating. Doesn’t seem to make a difference. I’ve never had this issue with separate seating and crimp dies.

Here are 4 distinct seating depths coming out. The first is properly seated in the cannelure.

123948
 

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See if you have a build up or lube or lead in your seating die.
 
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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
See if you have a build up or lube or lead in your seating die.
brand new dies but I can check on it tomorrow. I’ve only loaded 66 rds with them.

Are all your cases trimmed to the same length?
Brand new Starline brass. Never been loaded. The OAL is different so it wouldn’t be the brass.
 

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I said that I thought that the pressure was higher in the Contender than the Model 57 but, I don't think that was the problem. My Model 57 had a 6 1/2-inch barrel. The H110 should have been essentially burned even in the Model 57. I think that the Contender probably had a funky (sorry for the technical term) chamber. Anyway, it's academic because I rebarreled it to a .411 JDJ.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
I ordered a factory crimp die. I think the shoulder on the sticky lead bullets are hitting the crimp portion of the die causing the random seating depths. This will allow me to drop the bullet seater down a lot further and seat the bullets without worrying about the crimp getting in the way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
The 41 magnum does not like to chamber the lino bullets when the crimp is in the cannelure. They are too long for the action. Good thing I only loaded 60.

The factory crimp die was back ordered so I cancelled the order. Still on the hunt for one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I backed the crimp off and dropped the seater in the die to seat the bullet without a crimp. They all came out perfect. It’s definitely the crimp portion of the die.

On that note, who has a 41 magnum revolver still? I need to know what it is and how long the cylinder is. Unfortunately, I don’t feel all that comfortable seating the lino bullets deeper than 1.665” which is over max OAL. They are a tad too long for the Henry at that length. If they will work in a revolver, then I’ll go ahead and load them up. If not, I’ll set them aside for another purpose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
I just went through and crimped the 330 I just ran. Seems the bullets stayed where they were when crimping.

This pic shows the difference in OAL. The short one is a hard cast. It is proper length when crimped in the cannelure. The longest is a lino seated in its cannelure. The middle one is the deepest I feel comfortable seating the lino due to possible setback and leaving lead chunks in the barrel.

124085
 

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I backed the crimp off and dropped the seater in the die to seat the bullet without a crimp. They all came out perfect. It’s definitely the crimp portion of the die.

On that note, who has a 41 magnum revolver still? I need to know what it is and how long the cylinder is. Unfortunately, I don’t feel all that comfortable seating the lino bullets deeper than 1.665” which is over max OAL. They are a tad too long for the Henry at that length. If they will work in a revolver, then I’ll go ahead and load them up. If not, I’ll set them aside for another purpose.
I sold my Model 57 and I kind of miss it so I can't give you the info. Sorry!
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
124789


.41 magnum factory crimp die is in… back to it to finish up the 215 gr hardcast. Them I’ll move on to the 210gr JHPs.

On a side note, IDK what chemicals are in Lil’ Gun but in the 48 hours that powder sat in my trickler, it etched the plastic hopper. It’s clear so it can easily be seen.
 
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