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Dong Tam, RSVN '69/'70
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm pretty sure most on NGF have a favorite kind or type of firearm they collect. It has occured to me recently that what I collect is dependant upon the people I am with when the subject of collecting comes up. If I am in the company of Cowboy Action folks I find myself saying I collect Single Action handguns. With others I claim to collect military weapons. At the indoor range I tell folks I collect .22's. When in the cafe, talking with hunters, I claim to collect big bore handguns.

After realizing that all of these claims are correct, it dawns on me that either I have a very eclectic collection or that I simply collect "guns of interest"!

Anyway, one of the largest groups of guns in my pile, is the .22 LR. I can't resist either handguns or long guns. If it is old, weird, different, or special for any reason, I buy it. Some of these guns are looked down upon by many but I welcome them with open arms.

One of the many benefits of collecting in this manner is that when a new candidate for the pile pops up, I have to research it and I learn something new.

Anyway, the subject of todays post is a .22 rifle. It is made by Daisy, the folks who make the BB guns. It is a Daisy Legacy Model 2202 Bolt Action .22 LR. Daisy made .22 caliber rifles from 1990 through the first half of 1992.

This is not the first .22 caliber firearm Daisy made but it is the first to use a .22 LR cartridge. In 1968 they produced the model VL0001 which used a .22 caliber caseless round. The VL was only produced for approximately 8 months.

There were 6 different variations of the cartridge gun: single shot, bolt action, and semi automatic with each one made in polymer or hardwood stock. The models with hardwood stocks are the hardest to find with the single shot being the most rare.

I found my first Legacy on a CCR sale site. It is a model 2203 Semi Automatic with a hardwood stock. It is being shipped to me as we speak. Yesterday, in a small gunshop in Central Florida that I had never been in before, I found my second rifle. It is a Legacy Model 2202 Bolt Action with a polymer stock.

While the value of these little guns is not high, they have been "discovered" and the value for examples of the rarest models in good shape have gone up to the $250 to $300 range. I trust the value will continue to go up as the guns become harder to find.

The Legacy that I bought yesterday has some interesting features. First of all, it has a polymer stock. This allowed Daisy to make the first true "kid's" gun that would grow with a child as he/she grew. By pushing a button in the stock it allowed the butt of the stock to extend in half inch increments as the childs arms grew longer. It allowed a length of pull from 12 and 1/4 inches to 14 and 1/2 inches.

The barrel seems to be some type of alloy with a steel liner.

The gun is also modular in design. With a single push button behind the trigger guard, the entire enclosed trigger group comes out of the gun in one piece for cleaning or replacement. The barrel is removable by a knurled nut and the gun can be broken down into an 18 inch package. The pull on the trigger is just under 4 lbs (3 lbs 14 ounces).

The magazine for the bolt action models holds 10 rounds and is a circular magazine that is a duplicate of the Ruger magazine for the 10/22. I can't prove it yet, but I have seen it hinted, that the main reason the guns were only produced for a short time was a combination of lack of government permits and licenses to build firearms as well as patent problems with Ruger over the design of the magazine.

The semi auto models have a 7 shot, single stack magazine. Both types of magazines are extremely difficult to find.

My rifle also has the original period scope with the Daisy marked scope rings on it. The scope is a Simmons 3-7X20.

It was to cold for a formal visit to the range but a quick walk out behind the pole barn produced some groups of 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch at 25 yards and 1 and 5/8 of an inch at 50 yds. The gun shot well with no failures. I shot one box (50 rounds) of PMC Zappers.

So if your still reading, thanks for your interest. I am searching for the other models of this little gun. Ultimately I would like to have one of each of the 6 variations made by Daisy.

Here are a few pictures....

Don



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The 500 S&W stare...
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Hey! I am glad the other guy decided not to pay!! Hehe
I am glad you got it! Nobody will give it a better home.
 

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Good deal BangBang....sounds like your on your way to having a set...!



I saw in two places that the (7 round box) was "similiar" to but not interchangeable with, the 10/22..of course, you have both and if they are,
they are...:thumbsup:

you probably have thi sinfo, but here is some excerpt from
Rifles of the World, By John Walter...I hope you can read the scan...LOL


Said all modles of the series could be shotguns also, by changing to a
smooth bore barrel....and some were sold as a set for such...interesting...

I guess...by shotgun , they mean "rat shot 22 "....? :biggrin5:

regards,
 

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Dong Tam, RSVN '69/'70
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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks 1shot! I am always grateful for info and sources for my current "Gun Du jour"!

I am curious about one thing however. I find more than one reference to the Legacy Rifles being manufactured in 1988 and 1989... however, according to Daisy on their website.....

"In 1990 Daisy began manufacturing their "Legacy" line of conventional .22 caliber firearms. There were a total of six models, including: two single shot rifles, two bolt action rifles and two semi-automatic rifles. Three had copolymer stocks and three had hardwood stocks. This firearm, like the "VL", was short lived." The website is at....

http://www.daisyking.com/history/daisy.htm

It is only a year or two difference but I'm curious as to the discrepancy. I am sure the mistake is on the part of Daisy (there are to many reputable sources that agree on the year 1988) and this tends to make me distrustful of other info on the Daisy site.

I appreciate your efforts to help me research a firearm when I post one on NGF. I have learned a lot from reading what you discover beating the bushes....

Don
 

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Daisy Rifle

I'm pretty sure most on NGF have a favorite kind or type of firearm they collect. It has occured to me recently that what I collect is dependant upon the people I am with when the subject of collecting comes up. If I am in the company of Cowboy Action folks I find myself saying I collect Single Action handguns. With others I claim to collect military weapons. At the indoor range I tell folks I collect .22's. When in the cafe, talking with hunters, I claim to collect big bore handguns.

After realizing that all of these claims are correct, it dawns on me that either I have a very eclectic collection or that I simply collect "guns of interest"!

Anyway, one of the largest groups of guns in my pile, is the .22 LR. I can't resist either handguns or long guns. If it is old, weird, different, or special for any reason, I buy it. Some of these guns are looked down upon by many but I welcome them with open arms.

One of the many benefits of collecting in this manner is that when a new candidate for the pile pops up, I have to research it and I learn something new.

Anyway, the subject of todays post is a .22 rifle. It is made by Daisy, the folks who make the BB guns. It is a Daisy Legacy Model 2202 Bolt Action .22 LR. Daisy made .22 caliber rifles from 1990 through the first half of 1992.

This is not the first .22 caliber firearm Daisy made but it is the first to use a .22 LR cartridge. In 1968 they produced the model VL0001 which used a .22 caliber caseless round. The VL was only produced for approximately 8 months.

There were 6 different variations of the cartridge gun: single shot, bolt action, and semi automatic with each one made in polymer or hardwood stock. The models with hardwood stocks are the hardest to find with the single shot being the most rare.

I found my first Legacy on a CCR sale site. It is a model 2203 Semi Automatic with a hardwood stock. It is being shipped to me as we speak. Yesterday, in a small gunshop in Central Florida that I had never been in before, I found my second rifle. It is a Legacy Model 2202 Bolt Action with a polymer stock.

While the value of these little guns is not high, they have been "discovered" and the value for examples of the rarest models in good shape have gone up to the $250 to $300 range. I trust the value will continue to go up as the guns become harder to find.

The Legacy that I bought yesterday has some interesting features. First of all, it has a polymer stock. This allowed Daisy to make the first true "kid's" gun that would grow with a child as he/she grew. By pushing a button in the stock it allowed the butt of the stock to extend in half inch increments as the childs arms grew longer. It allowed a length of pull from 12 and 1/4 inches to 14 and 1/2 inches.

The barrel seems to be some type of alloy with a steel liner.

The gun is also modular in design. With a single push button behind the trigger guard, the entire enclosed trigger group comes out of the gun in one piece for cleaning or replacement. The barrel is removable by a knurled nut and the gun can be broken down into an 18 inch package. The pull on the trigger is just under 4 lbs (3 lbs 14 ounces).

The magazine for the bolt action models holds 10 rounds and is a circular magazine that is a duplicate of the Ruger magazine for the 10/22. I can't prove it yet, but I have seen it hinted, that the main reason the guns were only produced for a short time was a combination of lack of government permits and licenses to build firearms as well as patent problems with Ruger over the design of the magazine.

The semi auto models have a 7 shot, single stack magazine. Both types of magazines are extremely difficult to find.

My rifle also has the original period scope with the Daisy marked scope rings on it. The scope is a Simmons 3-7X20.

It was to cold for a formal visit to the range but a quick walk out behind the pole barn produced some groups of 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch at 25 yards and 1 and 5/8 of an inch at 50 yds. The gun shot well with no failures. I shot one box (50 rounds) of PMC Zappers.

So if your still reading, thanks for your interest. I am searching for the other models of this little gun. Ultimately I would like to have one of each of the 6 variations made by Daisy.

Here are a few pictures....

Don



.


.


.
I read your post concerning the Daisy .22 gauge rifle. I currently have one of these that is bolt action with the polymer stock. I would be happy to send you some pictures. Also, if you have any questions please let me know. I am trying to find someone that would like to purchase this rifle. If you have any suggestions please let me know. Thank you.
 

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I read your post concerning the Daisy .22 gauge rifle. I currently have one of these that is bolt action with the polymer stock. I would be happy to send you some pictures. Also, if you have any questions please let me know. I am trying to find someone that would like to purchase this rifle. If you have any suggestions please let me know. Thank you.
 

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Dong Tam, RSVN '69/'70
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Discussion Starter #7
I may be interested your Daisy dependent on your price... How much do you want for it?

Don
 

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Yeah, Daisy stopped making the .22 caseless models because they were technically "firearms", and Daisy didn't have the license to manufacture them, so they had to stop production.
 

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Dong Tam, RSVN '69/'70
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Discussion Starter #9
What is a "caseless" model?

Don
 

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caseless_ammunition#Modern_caseless_firearms

One of the first caseless firearm and ammunition systems produced was actually made by Daisy, the airgun maker, in 1968. The V/L Rifle used a .22 caliber (5.5 mm) low powered caseless round with no primer. The rifle was basically a spring-piston air rifle, but when used with the V/L ammunition the energy from the compression of the piston heated the air behind the caseless cartridge enough to ignite the propellant, and this generated the bulk of the energy of firing. The Daisy V/L Rifle system was discontinued in 1969 after the BATF ruled that it was not an airgun, but a firearm, which Daisy was not licensed to produce.[10]
 

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Dong Tam, RSVN '69/'70
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Discussion Starter #11
While that is true, there is no connection between the caseless system and the .22 rifles discussed in this post.

I don't understand what the V/L system and the .22LR rifles have in common.

The Legacy .22 LR rifles went into production in 1988...

Don
 

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Sorry, it took so long to get back to you. First this gun is in excellent shape, The only thing wrong with it is that the scope mounting brackets are a little bent. This makes the scope off like 2 to 3 degrees, However, can be fixed without any problem. This rifle shows it has been well taken care of. The model no. is 2202. Also, on the gun is CAL22LR only. The serial no. is ADOD49619. I have found various estimates regarding the worth of the rifle. I would like to get around the $175 area. I am willing to negotiate the buyer's offer. I will post pictures if you would like. Appreciate you responding about the rifle.
 

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Dong Tam, RSVN '69/'70
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Discussion Starter #13
I don't know where you live but unless its here in Florida it is more than I want to pay for the gun.

By the time I pay shipping, transfer fee, and background check its just to much money.

Thank You anyway....

Don
 

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WOW you are right that mag looks real close to the Ruger 10-22 - I remember reading up on there caseless model awhile back and then for a time searched for one but gave up - very interesting info
 

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prices of collector's items only rarely reflect the rareness of the gun. look at the prices of WW2 1911's, even tho literally MILLIONS of such gun exist. :)
 

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I had one of those for a number of years. I got it for one of my sons (about 12 at the time) in the early 90's and it seemed like a pretty good starter gun, especially for a kid. I sold it a few years back since he is now grown and in his thirties. I actually saw one for sale at a local gun show a few month ago. It still had the original box and all the factory paperwork and was selling for $150.
 

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I know this is an old post but I was just looking up this rifle, i have the 2202 model with the black polymer stock and was looking to purchase a different stock, my father bought it for me when i was 12 and i'm turning 33 in november. I still have it and just started hunting again after about 13 years of hiatus and took it out to kill some squirrels. After reading how rare it is, i think i'll keep the original stock and eventually hand it down to my son when he's ready.
 

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I think I paid around $100 or so for my gun NIB, but don't quote me. We shot it a few times then he complained it was too much like a BB gun, and didn't feel like a "real" rifle. He started using my Ruger 10/22 instead of his Daisy and never picked it up again. It wasn't a bad gun, but it felt too much like a toy to both me and my son.

I'm actually surprised it didn't sell better, especially with groups like the Boy Scouts. I'd have thought the Boy Scouts would have jumped all over those Daisy 22's. My sons have all been scouts and Daisy BB guns were used almost exclusively by all of them when they were first learning to shoot. It's one of the reasons I purchased one of the Daisy .22's. I remain a BB gun range officer for several local Cub Scout groups to this day and we STILL use Daisy built guns. Oh well.
 
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