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Last Stand on Earth
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Vendor had it labeled as an 1851. I believe it’s an 1871 Navy model due to the gate and other design changes Colt incorporated just before the 1873 Peacemaker debuted. Someone here can correct me if I’m wrong but I think the 1872 was the Army model.

Anyway, the vendor had lots of pics of the gun so I’ll share those. This will be my first open top. $535 after tax/shipping/fees.
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AZHerper
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Looks a lot like my Uberti Cattleman which is an 1873 Colt replica. I was a fairly stout kicker so I wouldn't load those 45 Colts up near max particularly in an open top. And, you're right. It's an 1871.
 

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It could very well be an converted 1861. One thing that is a problem with cartridge conversions of the .36 cal C&B revolvers is that the bullet diameter for a .36 cal is .375 while the bullet diameter for a .38 Special or ..38 LC is .357. To make these revolvers accurate with the .38 cal ammo you either have to use hollow based wadcutter bullets or the barrel must be bored out and relined to a .357 bore diameter. The modern made 1872 open tops come from the factory with barrels in .357 diameter.
 

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Last Stand on Earth
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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
It could very well be an converted 1861. One thing that is a problem with cartridge conversions of the .36 cal C&B revolvers is that the bullet diameter for a .36 cal is .375 while the bullet diameter for a .38 Special or ..38 LC is .357. To make these revolvers accurate with the .38 cal ammo you either have to use hollow based wadcutter bullets or the barrel must be bored out and relined to a .357 bore diameter. The modern made 1872 open tops come from the factory with barrels in .357 diameter.
It's new so I doubt it’s a conversion. Appreciate the insight.
 

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I like that revolver! Wow... A Nice looker

I'm a fan of .38spl and have a few single actions .... Now I see I need an open top!

Congrats on the pickup
 

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The 1871-72 open tops used mostly C&B parts frames from 1860's and 1861's, The cylinders were essentially 1851, 1861 and 1860 cylinders cut down to make then open at both ends for cartridge use. Note the naval battle scene roll engraved on the cylinder as on the 1851, 1861 percussion guns The cartridges these were originally chambered in used heeled bullets similar to .22 rimfire bullets so they worked with the original percussion barrels without issues of bore diameter as with modern cartridges. They were essentially a factory made conversion gun. Kenny Howell was offering conversions for 1851, and 1861's where he offered to bore out and reline barrels to .357 dia. He also offered to rent a fixture for milling out the loading gate slot for his gated conversions. He also offered a gated conversion for the 1860 Army. Navy models used modified 1861 parts and Army models used modified 1860 parts. Conversions had been available from gunsmiths for a few years prior to Colt offering a factory cartridge model.
And it is indeed a very nice revolver!
 
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AZHerper
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This is included in the article: The first prototype of the new gun was still chambered in .44 rimfire, but this new gun was chambered for the newest caliber known as the .45 Colt.
 

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I don't get what some people are saying, The 1871 open-top Colt Navy was chambered for 45 Colt.
Nope, that cartridge didn't come along till 1873. There were two variants of the 1871/1872 Colt revolver. One was a large frame based on the 1860 Colt Army and chambered in .44 Rimfire, The 1866 Winchester rifles and carbines were also chambered in .44 Rimfire. The small frame Colt was based on the 1861 Navy and chambered .38 rimfire.
 

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You are correct they did offer it in .45 Colt but most were .44 Rimfire. I suspect they were a little afraid of pressure issues from .full house .45 Colt ammo in an open top.
 

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Last Stand on Earth
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
There is a lot of confusion surrounding what was out there when. Honestly, I have trouble deciphering the truth one story from another.

Good read:

I know that there were Richards-Mason conversion for .38 rimfire and there were some Colt conversions but I don’t know that Colt 1871-1872 models were ever produced in .38 rimfire. At least I couldn’t find a reference. That would mean that the 1871 Navy in 38 never actually existed, which doesn’t bother me any. Just seems like a merge between two separate things that happened during the same timeframe.
 

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Last Stand on Earth
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I like that revolver! Wow... A Nice looker

I'm a fan of .38spl and have a few single actions .... Now I see I need an open top!

Congrats on the pickup
2.5lbs should be pretty pleasant to shoot. I think my 6.5” stainless Blackhawks are 3lbs and they are about as light in recoil as can be. I think it was about 2.2-2.8lbs of recoil. This ought to fall around 3-3.5 lbs neighborhood.
 

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Be sure to give us a range report? If it handles anything like my 1860's you're gonna love it.
 
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Last Stand on Earth
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Well, I got it home. Can’t say I’m impressed none.

Cylinder is improperly fitted. It binds so bad you can’t even turn it by hand without an extreme amount pressure.

The cylinder stop is dragging so bad it took the blue off the cylinder before I ever got to shoot it.

Front sight has been sanded. The blue is missing off the top and front of the sight. May have been done in the factory but I would have expected the finish to have been restored if that were the case.

Brass has a rough surface that’ll have to be polished out. (This was expected)

All that said, it’s pretty, for how long I have no idea. I did a gentle sand and 1500grit wet sand on the front and back of the cylinder at the contact points. It helped but if the wedge works all the way in, it’ll bind again. Not sure how this one made it out of the factory.

I would not waste extra money on a Taylor’s & Co. rebranded Uberti. It’s obvious there is no QC at Taylor’s or this would have been caught. There’s no point in paying extra for a rebranding if there is no quality control.
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It is in time, how I’m not sure as hard as I had to pull back on that hammer to help rotate the cylinder but it is in time. Cylinder too tight is dangerous, can cause it to bind and not rotate fully and fire when not lined up. I’ll either have to fix it myself or send it back. That pisses me off.

I can’t comment on the accuracy. It’s a 20mph wind and I fired 10 shots at water bottles. Only hit 4 but I was kind of aiming around a bit to find point of impact. I’ll try with paper another time.
 

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I hate when things don't work right. Ugh.

--Wag--
 

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AZHerper
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Well, I got it home. Can’t say I’m impressed none.

Cylinder is improperly fitted. It binds so bad you can’t even turn it by hand without an extreme amount pressure.

The cylinder stop is dragging so bad it took the blue off the cylinder before I ever got to shoot it.

Front sight has been sanded. The blue is missing off the top and front of the sight. May have been done in the factory but I would have expected the finish to have been restored if that were the case.

Brass has a rough surface that’ll have to be polished out. (This was expected)

All that said, it’s pretty, for how long I have no idea. I did a gentle sand and 1500grit wet sand on the front and back of the cylinder at the contact points. It helped but if the wedge works all the way in, it’ll bind again. Not sure how this one made it out of the factory.

I would not waste extra money on a Taylor’s & Co. rebranded Uberti. It’s obvious there is no QC at Taylor’s or this would have been caught. There’s no point in paying extra for a rebranding if there is no quality control.
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View attachment 132680
View attachment 132679

It is in time, how I’m not sure as hard as I had to pull back on that hammer to help rotate the cylinder but it is in time. Cylinder too tight is dangerous, can cause it to bind and not rotate fully and fire when not lined up. I’ll either have to fix it myself or send it back. That pisses me off.

I can’t comment on the accuracy. It’s a 20mph wind and I fired 10 shots at water bottles. Only hit 4 but I was kind of aiming around a bit to find point of impact. I’ll try with paper another time.
Well...it does look nice. Did you ever tell us which caliber it actually came in?
 
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