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· Ancient Gaseous Emanation
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11 October 2019


A wildfire raged out of control along the northern edge of Los Angeles early Friday, forcing thousands of people from their homes as firefighters battled flames from the air and on the ground.

Police Chief Michel Moore said mandatory evacuations encompassed about 100,000 people in over 20,000 homes.

Fire Chief Ralph Terrazas said the fire had grown to more than 7 square miles (18 square kilometers) and at least 25 homes had been damaged. A middle-aged man who was near where the fire was burning went into cardiac arrest and died, the chief said, but he did not have details.

The blaze erupted around 9 p.m. Thursday along the northern tier of the San Fernando Valley as powerful Santa Ana winds swept through Southern California.

Terrazas said there were sustained winds of 20-25 mph (32-40 kph) with gusts over 50 mph (80 kph) and relative humidity levels had fallen as low as 3%.

"As you can imagine the embers from the wind have been traveling a significant distance which causes another fire to start," Terrazas said.

The fire erupted in Sylmar, the northernmost portion of the valley, and spread westward at a rate of 800 acres (324 hectares) an hour into Porter Ranch, part of a so-called urban-wildland interface where subdivisions crowd against the foothills of the Santa Susana Mountains. The cause wasn't immediately known.

Porter Ranch, an upper middle class suburb that was the backdrop for the 1982 movie "E.T." is no stranger to evacuations. Four years ago, a blowout at an underground natural gas well operated by Southern California Gas Co. in the neighboring Aliso Canyon storage facility drove 8,000 families from their homes.

Helicopters made repeated water drops as crews in Los Angeles attacked flames in and around homes. Water- and retardant-dropping airplanes joined the battle after daybreak. About 1,000 firefighters were on the lines.

Edwin Bernard, 73, said he and his wife were forced to leave their four cats behind as they fled their Sylmar home.

Bernard, standing outside the evacuation center at the Sylmar Recreation Center on Friday, said they were only able to grab their three dogs. During a previous wildfire, they'd had time to find their passports and photo albums, but not Thursday night.

"The fireman said, 'go, go, go!'" Bernard said. "It was a whole curtain of fire," he said. "There was fire on all sides. We had to leave."

Evacuations were also still in effect in the inland region east of Los Angeles where a fire erupted Thursday and raged through a mobile home park in the Calimesa area of Riverside County.

Seventy-four buildings were destroyed, others were damaged and Riverside County authorities were trying to determine if anyone was missing.

One person who couldn't be immediately located was Don Turner's 89-year-old mother.

Lois Arvickson called her son from her cellphone to say she was evacuating shortly after the blaze was reported in the small city of Calimesa, Turner said while with relatives at an evacuation center.

"She said she's getting her purse and she's getting out, and the line went dead," he said.

Arvickson's neighbors saw her in her garage as flames approached, according to Turner. A short time later the neighbors saw the garage on fire, but they don't know if she'd managed to escape, he said.

Fire danger is high throughout Southern California after the typically dry summer and early fall, and the notorious Santa Ana winds – linked to the spread of many wildfires – bring a dangerous mix of witheringly low humidity levels and powerful gusts.

The Calimesa fire erupted when the driver of a commercial trash truck dumped a smoldering load to prevent the vehicle from catching fire.

Dry grass quickly ignited and winds gusting to 50 mph (80 kph) blew the fire into the Villa Calimesa Mobile Home Park about 75 miles (120 kilometers) east of downtown Los Angeles. The park has 110 home sites and was built in 1958, according to its website. Fire officials were investigating what caused the trash in the truck to catch fire in Calimesa.




https://www.newsmax.com/newsfront/us-california-wildfires/2019/10/11/id/936728/
 

· Ancient Gaseous Emanation
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In Northern California , the lights were back on Friday for more than half of the 2 million residents who lost electricity after the Pacific Gas and Electric Co. utility switched it off on Wednesday to prevent its equipment from sparking wildfires during dry, windy weather.

PG&E restored the power after workers inspected power lines to make sure it was safe to do so. The winds had increased the possibility of transmission lines toppling to the ground and starting wildfires.
 

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Gonna blame this wildfire on PG&E too?
 

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This one is out of their sphere of influence. No word yet on the cause. For the saddle ridge fire in the porter ranch area.
 

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Popeye will find a way to blame them............
 

· Ancient Gaseous Emanation
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Its not so much blaming PG&E as it is stomping Fitasc into the mud.
 

· Ancient Gaseous Emanation
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One of the SoCal fires was reportedly started when a 'trash truck' dumped smoldering material. The wind stoked it into a major fire.
 

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Its not so much blaming PG&E as it is stomping Fitasc into the mud.
Challenge would be on, but since you're a Mod, and I am, not, I'll let you salivate in your disgust for them
 

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One of the SoCal fires was reportedly started when a 'trash truck' dumped smoldering material. The wind stoked it into a major fire.
Oh gee, yet ANOTHER fire where piss poor STATE management of the land has resulted in yet another disaster. If not PG&E, maybe SoCal Edison? Obviously in your mind the nazi state is never to blame; it MUST be someone else.....preferably some greedy for profit corporation
 

· Ancient Gaseous Emanation
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Oh gee, yet ANOTHER fire where piss poor STATE management of the land has resulted in yet another disaster. If not PG&E, maybe SoCal Edison? Obviously in your mind the nazi state is never to blame; it MUST be someone else.....preferably some greedy for profit corporation
No, just an admitted criminal corporation, the same corporation found guilty of negligent homicide in a court of law.
 

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Wait a second, before you said guilty of murder, now it is negligent homicide........since a corporation cannot be guilty of murder and murder details intent with malice aforethought, NH seems more apropos..........

woops...................:yikes1:

But this is still a fun discourse.
 

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For those of you who live in CA, a question: Why?
LaJolla and Carmel are two of the prettiest places in the country (alongside the Finger Lakes region of NY) and have some of the nicest weather temperature-wise
 

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The fire in Sylmar/Porter Ranch is called the Saddle Ridge Fire and is in Southern California Edison territory and operated by Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. This is a totally different company than PG&E but the two may have cross boundry feeds to help each other out. This is not PG&E territory!
 

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Correct. Transmission lines help connect outside power sources to the grids of the local electric utilities. CA imports a lot of power (and water). The act of moving energy like that is called wheeling:

In electric power transmission, wheeling is the transportation of electric energy (megawatt-hours) from within an electrical grid to an electrical load outside the grid boundaries. Two types of wheeling are 1) a wheel-through, where the electrical power generation and the load are both outside the boundaries of the transmission system and 2) a wheel-out, where the generation resource is inside the boundaries of the transmission system but the load is outside. Wheeling often refers to the scheduling of the energy transfer from one Balancing Authority to another. Since the wheeling of electric energy requires use of a transmission system, there is often an associated fee which goes to the transmission owners. In a simpler sense, it refers to the process of transmission of electricity through the transmission lines.

Transmission ownershipUnder deregulation, many vertically integrated utilities were separated into generation owners, transmission and distribution owners, and retail providers. In order to recover capital costs, operating costs, and earn a return on investment, a transmission revenue requirement (TRR) is established and approved by a national agency (such as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in the United States) for each transmission owner. The TRR is paid through transmission access charges (TACs), load-weighted fees charged to internal load and energy exports for use of the transmission facilities. The energy export fee is often referred to as a wheeling charge. When wheeling-through, the transmission access charge only applies to the exported amount.
Wheeling chargeA wheeling charge is a currency per megawatt-hour amount that a transmission owner receives for the use of its system to export energy. The total amount due in TAC fees is determined by the equation Total wheeling fee = Wc ($/MWh) * Pw (MW) * t (h)

The fee associated with wheeling is referred to as a "wheeling charge." This is an amount in $/MWh which transmission owner recovers for the use of its system. If the resource entity must go through multiple [transmission owner]s, it may be charged a wheeling charge for each one. The reasons for a wheeling charge are manifold. It may be simply to recover some costs of transmission facilities or congestion. However, another motivation would be to keep prices low. For instance, if the electricity prices in Arizona are 30 $/MWh and prices in California are 50 $/MWh, resources in Arizona would want to sell to the California market to make more money. The utilities in Arizona would then be forced to pay 50 $/MWh if they needed these resources. If Arizona charged a wheeling charge of 10 $/MWh, Arizona would only have to pay 40 $ /MWh to compete with California. However, Arizona would not want to charge too much, as this could impact advantages of trading electric energy between systems. In this way, it works similarly to [tariff]s.
 
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