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Thread: To take a class or not to take a class

  1. #11
    Senior Member NGF Addict! BOB/MO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jammer Six View Post
    I'm an instructor. Certified with the NRA. I'd avoid NRA classes.

    Beware the internet, you've received questionable advice already.
    Why do you say that Jammer? Ive been shooting all my life but wouldn't mine going to a NRA class.
    "A man's rights rest in three boxes: the ballot box, the jury box, and the cartridge box."
    - Frederick Douglass

    "When a strong man, fully armed, guards his house, his possessions are safe."
    - Luke 11:21

  2. #12
    Raindrop Counter Jammer Six's Avatar
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    I could tell you stories, but they'd be just that-- stories.

    At one of the first places I taught, they taught a straight NRA curriculum. At the next place I taught, they taught a straight Cooper-Gunsite curriculum. To compare two classes, take the Intro classes. (Or whatever title you like. Different ranges used different titles, at least throughout Puget Sound.) The first class someone who has never fired a gun before takes.

    In the NRA curriculum, that class is sixteen hours long. Sixteen. Two full days. It includes segments on positions that I've only seen used at that range, in that class, (sitting) and segments that are pure politics-- one in particular, "Why People Own Guns".

    In contrast, the next range I taught at taught an entry class that was four hours long, and that included shooting. Different safety rules, which confuses a lot of people. There is no standard.

    To quote one of my old instructors, "Sit 'em down. Tell 'em your name. Tell 'em the safety rules. Tell 'em about grip, stance, sight picture, trigger squeeze and follow through. Demonstrate the weapon. After that, why are you still talking? Get 'em on the line, get the weapons in their hands, watch 'em like a hawk, get the rounds downrange, get 'em out the door and let's go to dinner."

    There is always an agenda. At an NRA range, that agenda is political indoctrination and NRA recruiting-- some of the classes are like a ponzi scheme without the return for first tier investors. At the second range I mentioned, the agenda was money. At other ranges I've taught at, the entry class included a tour of the gunshop, or a segment about "Gunshop Etiquette" in their gunshop-- those ranges were about getting people to come back, enter the shooting sports and spend money where they first felt comfortable.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm an instructor. At one time, I made all my money teaching Intro, Basic and Defensive Handgun. Classes are usually good, and the OP here should absolutely, positively take a class. Skipping the class when you buy a firearm is like buying a car and then heading up an on ramp onto the interstate. If we're lucky, the only people you hurt will be you. If we're not lucky, there's no telling how much damage you could do.

    The NRA classes soured me permanently on the NRA as a whole.

  3. #13
    Senior Member NGF Addict! FREEDOMRING's Avatar
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    Aww take the class. Any small monetary investment will be well worth the material learned and all your questions answered.

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  5. #14
    DPM
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    Should this question ever arise, the answer will always remain the same. Yes take a class, it's always a good idea, like everyone's already said, you can never learn too much, especially in this particular field. Not to sound like a LibTard, but these things that you and I look at as objects of entertainment, tools, ways to put food on the table, even a defense tool, are in fact very dangerous in the hands of the uneducated, or dim witted. People can be seriously injured with guns that aren't handled properly, and should you ever actually NEED to use it, you want to be able to use it to the absolute best of your ability, and to do this, you need training. In a defense scenario your nerves are going to be screwed, the adrenaline will have you shaking, and you need to act quickly with precision, you need to know when it is necessary to pull that trigger and you need to be able to do that in a way that will both stop the threat and yet be safe at the same time, should you decide to carry a big hand cannon 500 magnum (god knows why...) you need to be fully aware that the bullet will most likely go all the way through and literally destroy anything on the other side, potentially another human being, possibly one that may not even be aware of what's going on. You also need to do this all within the blink of an eye, take into consideration you not only have an attacker, nerves, and adrenaline working against you here, but also time. You have literal seconds to make the decision and you need to get your weapon out as quickly and safely as possible. Example: Glocks have no real external safety, there is a lever on the trigger that prevents firing unless it is pulled, however, should you decide you want to carry a Glock pistol in oh...I don't know, a Blackhawk SERPA holster, there's a finger latch on the holster that keeps the weapon in place until you push the button to release it, conveniently aligned with the trigger. So you go to draw your firearm on an armed attacker who's coming at you and your finger slips because you weren't trained enough in the use of that particular holster and you shoot yourself in your own ass. Not going to look too smart at that particular juncture in your life.

    Long story short, take a class brother, you'll benefit. NRA instructors will always tell you that they are certified, all you need to do is ask.

  6. #15
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    My Fiance and I have decided to take a CCW course together some time in the very near future, thanks everyone for all the advice, it is much appreciated!!

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    You bet and be sure to let us all know how the two of you enjoyed the experience ...be safe.

  8. #17
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    My experience taking courses with the NRA was essentially the opposite of Jammer Six's. My instructor was polite, competent, knowledgeable, and had no agenda that I could detect; and I was definitely paying attention. After the class I felt confident that I could conduct a class of my own (and have, for 4 years now), and have been incident-free. I guess it depends on the instructor.
    Popeye and FREEDOMRING like this.
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  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gaffistick View Post
    Which brings me to my question, should I still take a training class?
    For me, yes, you have to take a training class. Because sometimes we thought our knowledge and learning is enough but actually not so we should still be always open to learn new things.

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    Hi, I teach the firearms classes for the Pima County Parks and Recreation and sometimes the advanced Inter-Agency courses at Ft. Huachuca. Please put you ymoney into courses. We have reduces out prices so that everyone can afford them because the Pima County Board of Supervisors believe that training reduces injuries. They are not pro gun, after my instructors (all cops) convinced them that training reduces injuries. In Phoenix (my son lives there) I will come up or introduce you to instructors who live there.
    Please go to massadayoob.com and gatorfarmtactical.com

  11. #20
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    if you decide to take a class, you'll be the only one professional enough to handle a gun.

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