DEMOCRATS Less Welcoming to GOP-voting Immigrants
Advertise with us Click for Rates
Results 1 to 6 of 6
Like Tree3Likes
  • 1 Post By Stevejet
  • 1 Post By PrairieHunt
  • 1 Post By Stevejet

Thread: DEMOCRATS Less Welcoming to GOP-voting Immigrants

  1. #1
    Senior Member NGF Addict!
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    17,989

    Default DEMOCRATS Less Welcoming to GOP-voting Immigrants

    OC Register

    When former Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott, R-Miss., decided to write a book about his life in the U.S. Senate, he titled it “Herding Cats: A Life in Politics.” If you’re not familiar with the expression, herding cats is an idiom “denoting a futile attempt to control or organize a class of entities which are uncontrollable or chaotic.” In his experience, that’s what it was like trying to get a hundred senators on the same page.

    In California the felines are a little bit easier to control – they all seem to hate President Trump and are willing to do anything possible to block his agenda.

    And the kitties like to scratch.

    Not long after President Trump was elected, state Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de Leon, D-Los Angeles, promised, “We will lead the resistance to any effort that would shred our social fabric or our Constitution. ... We’re going to do everything in our power to protect our people and our values as Californians.”

    The main point of contention appears to center around Trump’s vow to deport immigrants who came here illegally. De Leon has accused the president of wanting “to shock and awe and instill fear.”

    Which is why it’s funny that last week de Leon made headlines by shutting up an immigrant colleague and having her physically dragged off the Senate floor.

    The forcible ejection went down when state Sen. Janet Nguyen, R-Garden Grove, the first Vietnamese American in the country elected to a state senate seat, dared to criticize late state Sen. Tom Hayden’s, D-Santa Monica, support of the communists in Vietnam.

    The back story is that Nguyen immigrated to the United States from Vietnam by boat in 1981 when she was 5 years old, fleeing a brutal communist regime that killed members of her family.

    In the 1960s and ’70s, Hayden and his then-wife Jane Fonda took their anti-war activism to the extreme and openly supported a communist military victory for the North Vietnamese, over our allies in South Vietnam. That was an inflammatory position that led many, including myself, to believe that he and Fonda were traitors to the United States.

    Fast forward to October of last year – Hayden died and members of the Democratic majority decided to invite his third wife and widow, Barbara Williams, to the floor of the Senate last Tuesday so that he could be eulogized.

    Out of respect for the widow, Nguyen decided to wait until Thursday to deliver her critical remarks. In Vietnamese Nguyen said, “Mr. Hayden sided with a communist government that enslaved and/or killed millions of Vietnamese, including members of my own family. Mr. Hayden’s actions are viewed by many as harmful to democratic values and hateful towards those who sought the very freedoms on which this nation is founded.”

    As soon as she transitioned to English, Sen. Bill Monning, D-Carmel, a friend of Hayden’s, told her to zip it.

    She didn’t.

    That’s when the presiding officer, Sen. Ricardo Lara, D-Bell Gardens, had her 86’d from the Senate floor.

    Who knew the California Senate could kick immigrants out at a much faster pace than the Trump administration?

    De Leon has promised to investigate the situation.

    For the record, this isn’t the first time that California Democrats have tried to tell Nguyen, and her fellow refugees fleeing the horrors of communism, to take a hike.

    In 1975 when Republican President Gerald Ford asked California to accept half a million Vietnamese refugees, then-Gov. Jerry Brown told him to drop dead. Brown’s argument was, “We can’t be looking 5,000 miles away and at the same time neglecting people who live here.”

    And then he threatened to block refugee flights into Travis Air Force Base, just outside San Francisco.

    But that was back when refugees were fierce anti-communists who voted Republican.

    As we have learned, the Democrats still don’t want them. I guess California is only a “sanctuary” for those willing to shut up and toe the Democratic Party line.

    John Phillips is a CNN political commentator and can be heard weekdays at 3 p.m. on “The Drive Home with Jillian Barberie and John Phillips” on KABC/AM 790.

    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]
    Last edited by Stevejet; 03-02-2017 at 09:34 PM.
    Andy 22/308 likes this.

  2. #2
    Ancient Gaseous Emanation Popeye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Sacramento area, CA
    Posts
    53,499

    Default

    California is a sanctuary only for criminal, illegal aliens. Immigrants who play the game by its rules need not apply.

    This only makes sense to democrats.
    The difference between a Socialist and a Communist is that the Socialist doesn't have all the guns yet.

  3. #3
    Senior Member NGF Addict!
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    17,989

    Default

    " Immigrants who play the game by its rules need not apply."

    Because it is assumed, and probably correctly, that people who abide by laws and play by the rules will not Vote DEMOCRAT.

    DEMOCRATS, almost without fail, cannot face the truths as presented by Reality.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    NationalGunForum.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Senior Member NGF Addict! PrairieHunt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Black Hills of South Dakota
    Posts
    5,871

    Default

    I guess Sacramento couldn't stand the fact that these immigrants actually built up bad parts of town. With nothing to begin with. Garden Grove, Westminster, Fountain Valley.... all had parts literally dying. Now thriving, thanks to the Vietnamese.
    I do confess.... I wish this more of this legislator's constituents would learn how to actually drive.
    Stevejet likes this.
    "​My dog sleeps with me, and we both snore."

  6. #5
    Senior Member NGF Addict!
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    17,989

    Default

    "........ I wish this more of this legislator's constituents would learn how to actually drive."

    That hasn't happened yet, and I've been here since 1992. But this is beside the point.
    PrairieHunt likes this.

  7. #6
    Senior Member NGF Addict!
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    17,989

    Default

    OC Register/Heather Marie Stuhr - Contributing Writer

    "Memory of War Should Include Vietnamese Voices"


    When state Sen. Janet Nguyen’s colleagues forcibly removed her from the Senate floor Feb. 23 as she read a statement regarding the late Tom Hayden’s anti-Vietnam War activism and 1965 visit to North Vietnam, they participated in the ongoing silencing and erasing of Vietnamese voices from the complex story of the Vietnam War and its legacies.
    For more than four decades, American historians, journalists, military veterans and peace activists have told a fairly one-dimensional, U.S.-centric account of the Vietnam War. The central theme of that story is encapsulated in the headline of a Newsweek cover story from 1981: “What Vietnam Did to Us.” Across the U.S. political spectrum, the Vietnam War story is a story about Americans: American troops, American policymakers, American activists, American civilians. Hayden and other anti-war protesters are the heroes of the left’s narrative. Those on the right argue that the U.S. military engaged in a noble fight that was winnable had Congress not given in to the war resisters. American writers have spent much less time trying to understand Vietnamese perspectives, especially of those who supported the Saigon government.

    These are the people Sen. Nguyen, a Republican, represented when she began to read her speech criticizing former state Sen. Hayden. In a statement she issued after her removal from the Senate floor, Sen. Nguyen noted that she spoke for her constituents, many of whom were refugees who fled South Vietnam as the country collapsed in April 1975. Some had worked for the Saigon government, some had served in South Vietnam’s military, and some had collaborated with the Americans. They worried about punishment or worse at the hands of the North Vietnamese. While the bloodbath that U.S. Ambassador to South Vietnam Graham Martin had predicted never materialized, thousands of South Vietnamese did time in re-education camps after the war. For many of those who fled, their Vietnam died when Saigon fell. From their perspective, Hayden had supported the enemy government and military that destroyed it.

    This incident in the state Senate chamber illustrates the politics of Vietnam War history and memory. Sen. Nguyen’s Democratic colleagues asserted that she failed to follow proper parliamentary procedure when she spoke. Senate Majority Leader Bill Monning accused her of impropriety for disparaging a deceased legislator. But the silencing of Sen. Nguyen represents a larger conflict over whose perspectives on the Vietnam War Americans are willing to recognize. For some on the left especially, the war validated a broader critique of the hubris and brutality of U.S. foreign policy. In their telling of the story, American imperialists fought Vietnamese nationalists in a war for Vietnam’s independence. The voices of Vietnamese who supported the Saigon government and considered South Vietnam their nation throw an inconvenient wrench into this story of stark contrasts.

    Yet acknowledging the viewpoints of anticommunist Vietnamese who opposed the Hanoi government does not necessarily indicate support for U.S. intervention. It is possible to write South Vietnamese perspectives into the Vietnam War narrative without justifying American escalation of the war. It is also possible to recognize that, to those who lost everything, Hayden was a painful reminder of international opposition to their Vietnam. The U.S. anti-war movement, which Hayden represented, constitutes an important chapter in the Vietnam War story, and American historians, journalists and participants have ensured that we remember it as central to the narrative. For Sen. Nguyen and other Vietnamese refugees and their families, it is an upsetting chapter. As long as this perspective remains silenced, we Americans will not fully understand what Vietnam did to all of us, including Sen. Nguyen, her family and her constituents.

    Heather Marie Stur, Ph.D., is an associate professor of history at the University of Southern Mississippi and a fellow in the Dale Center for the Study of War & Society. She is the author of “Beyond Combat: Women and Gender in the Vietnam War Era” (Cambridge 2011) and is writing Saigon at War: South Vietnam and the Global Sixties (forthcoming from Cambridge).

    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]
    Last edited by Stevejet; 03-03-2017 at 03:53 PM.

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)