Who reloads their own ammo? Should I make the investment? - Page 2
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Thread: Who reloads their own ammo? Should I make the investment?

  1. #11
    Senior Member NGF Addict! fixitfred's Avatar
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    Reloading is not for everyone and it may not be for you. This is why you shouldn't reload:

    You haven't shot the ammo you have in five years.

    You like shooting 22's.

    You may not have the respect for how difficult and dangerous it can be.
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  2. #12
    Senior Member NGF Addict! Zhills's Avatar
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    I load with a single stage Hornady press and have for going on 30 years. I load .223, 30-06, .243 and .327 fed. all one round at a time. I don't load 9mm, 45 ACP cause I can buy it cheaper. I usually do batches of 50 in a three stage process.
    1. De-cap and clean.
    2. Size, Trim, and Prime.
    3. Drop powder and press bullets.

    I weigh every powder charge. What I load it used for hunting.

    If you want speed, buy a Dillion RL550 or Hornady AP. These are progressive ammo plants.
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  3. #13
    Senior Member NGF Addict! AgedWarrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr jones15 View Post
    Do you have to sit there and weigh up each individual cartridges grain weight?
    Not necessarily, but it really depends on what you are loading. If you are cranking out target loads for handguns, you can typically set up your powder measure to throw each charge once you have it adjusted. But you should still check it periodically. I verify what is throwing about every ten rounds for this sort of ammo. If you are loading maximum loads for rifles especially, but handguns too, you should be a little more careful as powder measures tend to vary slightly, and more so with some types of powders because of the shape of the powder grains. Additionally, if you are loading rifle ammo your best accuracy comes from careful powder measuring among other things. I get the impression that you really do not know much about reloading, so I would recommend doing some reading first to see what is involved. There are a variety of errors possible when reloading; some of which can result in injury or even death when the firearm is destroyed. I would never recommend anyone go into high volume reloading like you are describing until they learned the basics on a simple single stage or turret press. Of course, that is just my opinion.
    fixitfred and Mike Weber like this.
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  5. #14
    Senior Member NGF Addict! Stamps6's Avatar
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    Dillion progressive isn’t about the best you can buy. With every lever throw a loaded round pops out. The customer service is tops.
    Mike Dillion died in 2016 but they are still in production by Titan Equipment and excellent equipment.
    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

  6. #15
    Keep calm & return fire NGF Addict! Speed's Avatar
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    I bought a progressive press (Dillon 550) and all supplies about 3 years ago and everything is still in its boxes. I've never set it up. My take is unless you are loading a boutique caliper or shooting competitively it isn't worth it. I just bought 1000rds of CCI/Speer 115gr 9mm for $179 shipped. It would have taken 4-6 hours to reload that versus 60 seconds and a few mouse clicks.

    Unless its a specialty caliper or you're shooting competitively and trying to squeeze every thousandths out for marksmanship (or you're retired and have the time to burn) I'd say its not worth it.
    Your milage may vary.
    Last edited by Speed; 02-09-2020 at 03:08 PM.
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  7. #16
    Super Moderator QuickdrawMcgraw's Avatar
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    I went out and purchased a progressive set up seven years ago just in case things got bad again. I see nothing swaying me to reload unless I want the cartridge to preform s desired way. Or the cartridge is EXPENSIVE to purchase or extremely hard to find. With this said I'll be picking up a 30.06 and a 45-70 this year so I feel new dies will be purchased shortly after I get these rifles :)

    Other then this for 500 rounds lets say 9mm is round 100 dollars depending on manufacture. One would need to include the time to make the 500 rounds and setting up the machine to make these cartridges preform like the manufacture build.
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  8. #17
    Senior Member ArthAnsgar's Avatar
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    For me, the appeal of reloading is less about saving money, and more about having the ability to reuse casing and reproduce my own ammo if there is ever a shortage (or an apocalypse ).

  9. #18
    Senior Member NGF Addict! Zhills's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr jones15 View Post
    Do you have to sit there and weigh up each individual cartridges grain weight?
    Powder measures are great and do quite well with spherical (ball) powders and can throw consistent charges within a .1 gn. But have a hard time with bar (stick) powders such as IMR 4350. I have both a Hornady and RBCS ( with a match meter). I still like to weigh each charge. I've been using the RBCS with CFE223 and it has been pretty consistant at throwing 26 gn. charges so weighing the charge is not adding that much time to the process.

  10. #19
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    You don't sound like you shoot much so I would say no, it would be a waste of money. Reloading takes time and patience. Even with an automated system. It takes setup time, load development time, time on or at the press monitoring and refilling bullets, brass, powder and primers. Unless you shoot 1000 rounds or more a month or need custom loads, you'll never recoup your money. Plus without experience and with a hurry up attitude, you could get yourself or someone else hurt.
    Mike Weber likes this.

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