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Thread: The system is corrupt

  1. #51
    Senior Member AFPVet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by C-D-P View Post
    So you wouldn't cover stopping a citizen who is OCing and disarming them for a fifteen minute talk under the minor infraction deal then?
    I believe that the only time to ask for someone's weapon would be if they are being arrested or are about to be transported by medic.

    Professional courtesy (in my opinion) would extend to military/veterans, public servants and lawful armed citizens.

  2. #52
    Galactic Effectuator Archie's Avatar
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    I spent 28 years as a uniformed, armed federal lawman. There's 'watching out for one's comrades' and there's perjury. This looks a whole lot like perjury. That, ladies and gentlemen, rubs me a little more than raw.

    Someone asked why are they on admin leave. It's because they get the same due process as any other accused violator. Presumably, the agency and the district attorney will do the right thing and see some consequence comes of this.

    And no, the "Will we let this man with xx years of honorable service be criminalized for one mistake?" excuse simply doesn't fly. (I won't use the word that comes to mind, but it involves processed equine foodstuffs.) I do not believe this is the first time any of them have done this sort of thing.

    No, I would not hire them. I don't even want them working with me. Not only are they crooked, they're stupid. Somehow it slipped their combined minds they all have dash cameras recording all this? Brilliant.

    Crooked and stupid is good when they're criminals. It's unforgivable when they're supposed to be the good guys.
    BBtruck likes this.
    I'm not really a professional gunfighter, but I used to play one in reality.

  3. #53
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    there are good and bad in every organization,we just hope the good can out weigh the bad
    The system will not allow,the laws will apply equally for all, or all men are created equally..
    Can only try to be fair,and honest.
    The best criminal law course I ever took was psychology class, and study what makes people tick,and act the way they do.
    How would you be if you had walked in their shoes?
    when I started LE my mother made me promise to her to treat people the way that I would want to be treated myself.
    Try to give dignity to people that would still be possibly arrested.
    All I can say is tere are lots of people out there that needs the chips knocked off their shoulder,and may others who need help or support.all though all walks of life.
    .

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  5. #54
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    To me it isnít so much a law breaking thing, as it is to boost their career by destroying someoneís life. They think nothing of it! It goes on all the time, I have been victim of it along with an endless list of others.


    Most of the time they get away with it, Itís one reason I donít go along with capitol punishment. The cops are not the only ones that are guilty of it.


    Many prosecutorís have knowingly held back evidence to get a conviction that would have never happened if it got into the court room.


    Then have a judge (I use that term loosely) refuse to hear the case over because new DNA comes up because their comfortable with the original findings!


    Some have said that little can be done to stop these abuses. I think it is high time we treat this sort of thing with the seriousness that it should be.


    If you are knowingly charging someone with bogus charges all involved should get no less than twice the max of time that the charges would ordinarily carry. With no parole.


    As the way things are setup the police can drag you in, attempt to convict you and if it doesnít go their way, no big deal they get paid for the time spent, the defendant he gets to pay for an attorney lose time for work. And all for what?


    All you so called good law enforcement people, your job is to enforce the law so why donít you do something about this sort of thing? If you are present when things like this take place and you donít do anything doesnít that make you an accomplice? If it is so, than you are no longer a good cop, well not to us taxpaying civilians.


    Or is it like I have heard some LEOís say from time to time of gun carrying civilians, they only have a clean record because they havenít been caught yet.


    Only the guilty need to feel that way, something about shoes fitting.
    Last edited by ntkb; 04-18-2011 at 10:43 PM.

  6. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brewster View Post
    LEO will do and say almost anything if one of their own is in legal danger. Very few would refuse to participate. Serpico told the truth, and got shot in the face for his trouble. I have family in LE, and they can't dispute this with a straight face. But they TRY!

    This is not a LE problem, it is a human problem. Humans will abuse their power. There are two kinds of LEOs. There are those who have a calling, and those who want to carry a gun and have power over their fellow man. The bad ones are probably in the minority, but my brother tells me that many good cops will shade toward the dark side as their careers go on. He can't look me in the eye and say he would not lie to protect a fellow officer as depicted in this story.

    But what to do about it? We need the police,and even the bad ones keep our society from bedlam. Power corrupts, and familiarity breeds contempt. But even the worst, most corrupt LEO, will charge into danger, as citizens flee.
    "many good cops will shade toward the dark side as their careers go on."
    That's what troubles me the most. Also, how they shade toward the dark side to protect a fellow LEO.

  7. #56
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    The system is not corrupt... by far its the best in the world, yet its far from perfect. Cops are human and make mistakes (i.e. lie, cheat, steal) and they should be punished harsher than a civilian because they should know better and they did swear to an oath.

    Sigtard

  8. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randomnist View Post
    Honestly...if you are out with someone every day, and have to trust them to protect your life, guard your back when you're being shot at, etc... I can certainly understand wanting to help that guy out. After all, who knows when you might be in a situation where you need help from that guy?

    I'm not saying framing someone is right, because it is certainly wrong, and there's no excuse for trying to make an innocent person pay for a crime they didn't commit, but I can certainly understand wanting to help out your fellow officer, its just a shame these guys decided to "bend" the laws to do it. After all, if a guy is an 11 year veteran, I can't think his punishment would be TOO severe for an accidental fender bender.
    Isn't it really that simple? What kind of repercussions would the officer for a fender bender except some embarrassment and ribbing. The lady was still DUI and wasn't entrapped or anything.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Popeye View Post
    It seems that when the RAT, Serpico was on the force this was the accepted way of getting out of a bust. His actions put a stop to this sort of corruption.

    Maybe those two guys hadn't gotten the memo.
    LOL, you believe a movie?

  10. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich60yo View Post
    LOL, you believe a movie?
    Perhaps you should do a bit of background work before posting.

    Serpico was a real police officer who exposed real corruption.

    Movie? You're the first to even mention the movie.
    The difference between a Socialist and a Communist is that the Socialist doesn't have all the guns yet.

  11. #60
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    Francesco Vincent "Frank" Serpico (born April 14, 1936) is a retired American New York City Police Department (NYPD) officer who holds both American and Italian citizenship. He is known for whistleblowing on police corruption in the late 1960s and early 1970s, an act that prompted Mayor John V. Lindsay to appoint the landmark Knapp Commission to investigate the NYPD
    The difference between a Socialist and a Communist is that the Socialist doesn't have all the guns yet.

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