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Thread: .22 LR Daisy Rifle

  1. #1
    Dong Tam, RSVN '69/'70 BangBang will become famous soon enough BangBang will become famous soon enough BangBang's Avatar
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    Default .22 LR Daisy Rifle

    I'm pretty sure most on NGF have a favorite kind or type of firearm they collect. It has occured to me recently that what I collect is dependant upon the people I am with when the subject of collecting comes up. If I am in the company of Cowboy Action folks I find myself saying I collect Single Action handguns. With others I claim to collect military weapons. At the indoor range I tell folks I collect .22's. When in the cafe, talking with hunters, I claim to collect big bore handguns.

    After realizing that all of these claims are correct, it dawns on me that either I have a very eclectic collection or that I simply collect "guns of interest"!

    Anyway, one of the largest groups of guns in my pile, is the .22 LR. I can't resist either handguns or long guns. If it is old, weird, different, or special for any reason, I buy it. Some of these guns are looked down upon by many but I welcome them with open arms.

    One of the many benefits of collecting in this manner is that when a new candidate for the pile pops up, I have to research it and I learn something new.

    Anyway, the subject of todays post is a .22 rifle. It is made by Daisy, the folks who make the BB guns. It is a Daisy Legacy Model 2202 Bolt Action .22 LR. Daisy made .22 caliber rifles from 1990 through the first half of 1992.

    This is not the first .22 caliber firearm Daisy made but it is the first to use a .22 LR cartridge. In 1968 they produced the model VL0001 which used a .22 caliber caseless round. The VL was only produced for approximately 8 months.

    There were 6 different variations of the cartridge gun: single shot, bolt action, and semi automatic with each one made in polymer or hardwood stock. The models with hardwood stocks are the hardest to find with the single shot being the most rare.

    I found my first Legacy on a CCR sale site. It is a model 2203 Semi Automatic with a hardwood stock. It is being shipped to me as we speak. Yesterday, in a small gunshop in Central Florida that I had never been in before, I found my second rifle. It is a Legacy Model 2202 Bolt Action with a polymer stock.

    While the value of these little guns is not high, they have been "discovered" and the value for examples of the rarest models in good shape have gone up to the $250 to $300 range. I trust the value will continue to go up as the guns become harder to find.

    The Legacy that I bought yesterday has some interesting features. First of all, it has a polymer stock. This allowed Daisy to make the first true "kid's" gun that would grow with a child as he/she grew. By pushing a button in the stock it allowed the butt of the stock to extend in half inch increments as the childs arms grew longer. It allowed a length of pull from 12 and 1/4 inches to 14 and 1/2 inches.

    The barrel seems to be some type of alloy with a steel liner.

    The gun is also modular in design. With a single push button behind the trigger guard, the entire enclosed trigger group comes out of the gun in one piece for cleaning or replacement. The barrel is removable by a knurled nut and the gun can be broken down into an 18 inch package. The pull on the trigger is just under 4 lbs (3 lbs 14 ounces).

    The magazine for the bolt action models holds 10 rounds and is a circular magazine that is a duplicate of the Ruger magazine for the 10/22. I can't prove it yet, but I have seen it hinted, that the main reason the guns were only produced for a short time was a combination of lack of government permits and licenses to build firearms as well as patent problems with Ruger over the design of the magazine.

    The semi auto models have a 7 shot, single stack magazine. Both types of magazines are extremely difficult to find.

    My rifle also has the original period scope with the Daisy marked scope rings on it. The scope is a Simmons 3-7X20.

    It was to cold for a formal visit to the range but a quick walk out behind the pole barn produced some groups of 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch at 25 yards and 1 and 5/8 of an inch at 50 yds. The gun shot well with no failures. I shot one box (50 rounds) of PMC Zappers.

    So if your still reading, thanks for your interest. I am searching for the other models of this little gun. Ultimately I would like to have one of each of the 6 variations made by Daisy.

    Here are a few pictures....

    Don



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    .


    .
    Northtidesix likes this.
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  2. #2
    The 500 S&W stare... bigweatherby has a spectacular aura about bigweatherby has a spectacular aura about bigweatherby's Avatar
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    Default

    Hey! I am glad the other guy decided not to pay!! Hehe
    I am glad you got it! Nobody will give it a better home.
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    Senior Member NGF Addict! 1shot1k has a spectacular aura about 1shot1k has a spectacular aura about 1shot1k's Avatar
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    Good deal BangBang....sounds like your on your way to having a set...!



    I saw in two places that the (7 round box) was "similiar" to but not interchangeable with, the 10/22..of course, you have both and if they are,
    they are...

    you probably have thi sinfo, but here is some excerpt from
    Rifles of the World, By John Walter...I hope you can read the scan...LOL


    Said all modles of the series could be shotguns also, by changing to a
    smooth bore barrel....and some were sold as a set for such...interesting...

    I guess...by shotgun , they mean "rat shot 22 "....?

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  4. #4
    Dong Tam, RSVN '69/'70 BangBang will become famous soon enough BangBang will become famous soon enough BangBang's Avatar
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    Thanks 1shot! I am always grateful for info and sources for my current "Gun Du jour"!

    I am curious about one thing however. I find more than one reference to the Legacy Rifles being manufactured in 1988 and 1989... however, according to Daisy on their website.....

    "In 1990 Daisy began manufacturing their "Legacy" line of conventional .22 caliber firearms. There were a total of six models, including: two single shot rifles, two bolt action rifles and two semi-automatic rifles. Three had copolymer stocks and three had hardwood stocks. This firearm, like the "VL", was short lived." The website is at....

    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

    It is only a year or two difference but I'm curious as to the discrepancy. I am sure the mistake is on the part of Daisy (there are to many reputable sources that agree on the year 1988) and this tends to make me distrustful of other info on the Daisy site.

    I appreciate your efforts to help me research a firearm when I post one on NGF. I have learned a lot from reading what you discover beating the bushes....

    Don
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    I came into this world kicking, fighting, and covered with someone else's blood. The day someone tries to take away my guns, I'm willing to leave this world the same way!



    Please visit my website at [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

  5. #5
    Junior Member palexp is on a distinguished road
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    Default Daisy Rifle

    Quote Originally Posted by BangBang View Post
    I'm pretty sure most on NGF have a favorite kind or type of firearm they collect. It has occured to me recently that what I collect is dependant upon the people I am with when the subject of collecting comes up. If I am in the company of Cowboy Action folks I find myself saying I collect Single Action handguns. With others I claim to collect military weapons. At the indoor range I tell folks I collect .22's. When in the cafe, talking with hunters, I claim to collect big bore handguns.

    After realizing that all of these claims are correct, it dawns on me that either I have a very eclectic collection or that I simply collect "guns of interest"!

    Anyway, one of the largest groups of guns in my pile, is the .22 LR. I can't resist either handguns or long guns. If it is old, weird, different, or special for any reason, I buy it. Some of these guns are looked down upon by many but I welcome them with open arms.

    One of the many benefits of collecting in this manner is that when a new candidate for the pile pops up, I have to research it and I learn something new.

    Anyway, the subject of todays post is a .22 rifle. It is made by Daisy, the folks who make the BB guns. It is a Daisy Legacy Model 2202 Bolt Action .22 LR. Daisy made .22 caliber rifles from 1990 through the first half of 1992.

    This is not the first .22 caliber firearm Daisy made but it is the first to use a .22 LR cartridge. In 1968 they produced the model VL0001 which used a .22 caliber caseless round. The VL was only produced for approximately 8 months.

    There were 6 different variations of the cartridge gun: single shot, bolt action, and semi automatic with each one made in polymer or hardwood stock. The models with hardwood stocks are the hardest to find with the single shot being the most rare.

    I found my first Legacy on a CCR sale site. It is a model 2203 Semi Automatic with a hardwood stock. It is being shipped to me as we speak. Yesterday, in a small gunshop in Central Florida that I had never been in before, I found my second rifle. It is a Legacy Model 2202 Bolt Action with a polymer stock.

    While the value of these little guns is not high, they have been "discovered" and the value for examples of the rarest models in good shape have gone up to the $250 to $300 range. I trust the value will continue to go up as the guns become harder to find.

    The Legacy that I bought yesterday has some interesting features. First of all, it has a polymer stock. This allowed Daisy to make the first true "kid's" gun that would grow with a child as he/she grew. By pushing a button in the stock it allowed the butt of the stock to extend in half inch increments as the childs arms grew longer. It allowed a length of pull from 12 and 1/4 inches to 14 and 1/2 inches.

    The barrel seems to be some type of alloy with a steel liner.

    The gun is also modular in design. With a single push button behind the trigger guard, the entire enclosed trigger group comes out of the gun in one piece for cleaning or replacement. The barrel is removable by a knurled nut and the gun can be broken down into an 18 inch package. The pull on the trigger is just under 4 lbs (3 lbs 14 ounces).

    The magazine for the bolt action models holds 10 rounds and is a circular magazine that is a duplicate of the Ruger magazine for the 10/22. I can't prove it yet, but I have seen it hinted, that the main reason the guns were only produced for a short time was a combination of lack of government permits and licenses to build firearms as well as patent problems with Ruger over the design of the magazine.

    The semi auto models have a 7 shot, single stack magazine. Both types of magazines are extremely difficult to find.

    My rifle also has the original period scope with the Daisy marked scope rings on it. The scope is a Simmons 3-7X20.

    It was to cold for a formal visit to the range but a quick walk out behind the pole barn produced some groups of 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch at 25 yards and 1 and 5/8 of an inch at 50 yds. The gun shot well with no failures. I shot one box (50 rounds) of PMC Zappers.

    So if your still reading, thanks for your interest. I am searching for the other models of this little gun. Ultimately I would like to have one of each of the 6 variations made by Daisy.

    Here are a few pictures....

    Don



    .


    .


    .
    I read your post concerning the Daisy .22 gauge rifle. I currently have one of these that is bolt action with the polymer stock. I would be happy to send you some pictures. Also, if you have any questions please let me know. I am trying to find someone that would like to purchase this rifle. If you have any suggestions please let me know. Thank you.
    Northtidesix likes this.

  6. #6
    Junior Member palexp is on a distinguished road
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    I read your post concerning the Daisy .22 gauge rifle. I currently have one of these that is bolt action with the polymer stock. I would be happy to send you some pictures. Also, if you have any questions please let me know. I am trying to find someone that would like to purchase this rifle. If you have any suggestions please let me know. Thank you.

  7. #7
    Dong Tam, RSVN '69/'70 BangBang will become famous soon enough BangBang will become famous soon enough BangBang's Avatar
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    I may be interested your Daisy dependent on your price... How much do you want for it?

    Don
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    I came into this world kicking, fighting, and covered with someone else's blood. The day someone tries to take away my guns, I'm willing to leave this world the same way!



    Please visit my website at [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

  8. #8
    Senior Member Mears is on a distinguished road Mears's Avatar
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    Yeah, Daisy stopped making the .22 caseless models because they were technically "firearms", and Daisy didn't have the license to manufacture them, so they had to stop production.

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  9. #9
    Dong Tam, RSVN '69/'70 BangBang will become famous soon enough BangBang will become famous soon enough BangBang's Avatar
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    What is a "caseless" model?

    Don
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    I came into this world kicking, fighting, and covered with someone else's blood. The day someone tries to take away my guns, I'm willing to leave this world the same way!



    Please visit my website at [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

  10. #10
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    [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

    One of the first caseless firearm and ammunition systems produced was actually made by Daisy, the airgun maker, in 1968. The V/L Rifle used a .22 caliber (5.5 mm) low powered caseless round with no primer. The rifle was basically a spring-piston air rifle, but when used with the V/L ammunition the energy from the compression of the piston heated the air behind the caseless cartridge enough to ignite the propellant, and this generated the bulk of the energy of firing. The Daisy V/L Rifle system was discontinued in 1969 after the BATF ruled that it was not an airgun, but a firearm, which Daisy was not licensed to produce.[10]

    The door you just kicked in? It was locked to protect you, not me.

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