3 barrel gun by Hollenbeck
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Thread: 3 barrel gun by Hollenbeck

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    Default 3 barrel gun by Hollenbeck

    A relative has introduced me to a 3 barrel gun by Hollenbeck, looks like 12 guage over some 25 caliber round, there are no other numbers except the # 35 on barrel and the receiver with the trigger mechanism, etc, no mention of caliber,etc
    The family member wants to sell it to me, the firing pins were removed for safety, I hope they are under the butt plate . I have ordered cerrosafe to solve the mystery of the rifle caliber and I've ordered a 1908 Three Barrel Gun Catelog for more information.
    The gun is very tight and sound, stock beat up like he used it alot. My family member figures it is worth $1000-$2000.
    I would plan to hunt with the gun and figure the rifle would be adequate to dispatch varmits. I have a Sauer Drilling 16/7x57 with 22 magnum long insert and detachable claw mount scope and have hunted with it often.
    Does the #35 allow me to find out other information? Any comments? thanks

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    forgot to mention, it was my grandfather's gun and it does say something like: "Pat Feb 1900"

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    HOLLENBECK GUN COMPANY

    Previous manufacturer located in Wheeling, WV circa 1901-1903, and Moundsville, WV circa 1903-1910.

    The Hollenbeck Gun Company began circa 1901, moved to Moundsville, WV in 1903 and stayed until they went out of business in 1910. The company name changed in 1905 to The Three Barrel Gun Company (circa 1905-1909), and then to The Royal Gun Company (circa 1909-1910). The company made a total of approx. 1,500 three barrel guns, as well as a few SxS models. After going out of business, an unknown Florida man bought the name and all the assets. He assembled and sold some three barrel guns as late as 1930.

    Pricing on these three-barrel shotguns with unique, sculpted recoil shields in average original condition typically ranges from $950 - $1,500 for both damascus (most common) and steel barrels. There were two basic grades - 0 and 1, but there are also shotguns with more elaborate engraving which will command a premium.

    Information appears courtesy of AntiqueGuns.com and the Gurnmeister.
    The difference between a Socialist and a Communist is that the Socialist doesn't have all the guns yet.

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    The Baker evolution is complicated and started with the W.H. Baker Co. i n Lisle, NY 1875-1877, then the W.H. Baker & Co. in Syracuse, which was f inanced by LC Smith and his brother Leroy, 1877-1880. Baker and Leroy S mith went to Ithaca, N.Y. and established the Ithaca Gun Co. in 1883. B aker left Ithaca early 1887 and returned to Syracuse to work with his b rother Dr. Ellis Baker at the Syracuse Forging Co., which soon became t he Syracuse Forging & Gun Co. They manufactured a hammer gun which was c alled the "New Baker." After the factory in Syracuse burned in the summ er of 1888, they moved to Batavia and became the Baker Gun & Forging Co . At the time of the move W. H. Baker was ill with TB and/or silicosis a nd they brought in Frank A. Hollenbeck as plant superintendent 1890-189 2. W. H. died Sept. 10, 1889. Frank Hollenbeck had three patents grante d while he was in Batavia, and two were assigned to the Baker Gun & For ging. Several different guns owe part of their designs to Frank A. Holl enbeck - Baker, Syracuse Arms Co., Baltimore Arms Co., Hollenbeck Gun C o., Royal Gun Co., and The Three Barrel Gun Co. Frank had earlier worke d with Baker in Lisle, NY, and later with Baker and L.C. Smith in Syrac use. Baker grades changed over the years, and the grade was not usually m arked on the frame. Early Baker Gun & Forging guns included the B grade w ith "London Twist" barrels, the A grade with "Fine Damascus", and the P aragon Grade with more extensive engraving, nicer wood, and finer Damas cus barrels. About 1897, the $100 Pigeon Gun was added which was essent ially a Paragon but with pigeons in the engraving and steel barrels. Th e Baker 'C' grade was a hammerless boxlock, and the first of the Batavi a grades. Later, the Paragon with Damascus barrels was called the P gra de, with Krupp steel barrels the N grade, an even nicer Trap Gun was ca lled the L grade, and the Expert and DeLuxe grades were added. Starting i n 1909 the R and S grades replaced the A grade and Krupp steel guns wer e labeled K grades. The Paragon Grade Model 1909 and a Baker Single Bar rel Trap were also introduced in 1909. The B hammerless and D grade ham mer gun, both with Twist barrels, were discontinued a few years later. A bout 1915, the Baker bolting system was redesigned for the Paragon and h igher grades to use a Greener style round cross bolt. The 1915 Dealers P rice Schedule lists barrel lengths of 26-, 28-, 30-, and 32-inch for th e Black Beauty ($18.85), Black Beauty Special ($34.85), Paragon ($60), P aragon-Ejector ($75), Expert ($137.50) and DeLuxe ($260). The first Bak er hammerless boxlock , referred to as the C Grade, was made by Baker f or Montgomery Ward in 1895, with Ward?s name on the rib. It was offered b y Baker about two years later with the Baker name. Baker also produced a ' trade' gun under "New Era Gun Works" and "Clark's Imperial, Omaha, Neb. " There were several variations of the lower priced "Batavia" line in t he 1909 ?The Baker Gunner?: the Batavia Leader with twist barrels at $2 5, the Batavia Special with steel barrels at $21.75, the Batavia Damasc us at $28, the Batavia Brush with 26-inch Twist barrels and a straight- grip stock at $24, the Batavia Ejector with steel barrels at $35 and wi th Damascus barrels for $37.50. To reduce costs the Batavia line did no t have the "firing pin block safety" or the "draw block" which passes t ransversely through the barrel lug and mates into recesses in the frame . The sidelock ?Black Beauty? replaced the Batavia Special, Leader, and D amascus guns about 1916. When Baker Gun & Forging sold their gun busine ss to H.∓D. Folsom in 1919, it was renamed Baker Gun Co., a 20 gauge g un was offered, and the Batavia Leader was reintroduced as a steel barr el gun similar to the old Batavia Special. A bit of engraving was added t o the Black Beauty and it was renamed the Black Beauty Special. Page 22 7 of the 27th Blue Book shows the grades for the Folsum era Baker Guns a s the Batavia Special, Batavia Leader, Black Beauty and Special, Batavi a Ejector, Baker S, Baker R, Paragon, Expert, and DeLuxe. Folsom era ca talogues listed the Black Beauty Special for $62 or $77 with ejectors, t he Paragon Grade for $100 or $115 with ejectors, the Expert Grade for $ 215 and the DeLuxe Grade for $385. In the fall of 1928, Folsom Baker ma gazine ads listed a 410 bore Batavia Leader, but it is unclear if any w ere actually manufactured. Folsom era Bakers have an F before or after t he serial number. Baker Gun Co. was closed in 1933, 44 years after the d eath of W.H. Baker, and the factory was converted to the manufacture of a utomobile parts. About 150,000 Baker guns were produced prior to the Fo lsom take-over; Folsom production numbers do not exist.

    Some time ago in The Double Gun Journal there was also an article on your type of -Drieling Gewehr-. However I coulnt find it back. -Sorry- The publishers of that have a website called "The Doublegun BBS" which is part of a site called doublegunshop.com

    If you go there and register for the BBS (which is free) and post a question regarding your drilling, someone will give you more information about the gun and the company (actually it was several companies over the years). Pictures and any list of markings on the gun would help with specific ID.

    (Used info from publications from
    "The Doublegun BBS")
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    ARMARIN
    Last edited by ARMARIN; 03-20-2017 at 04:47 AM.
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    I have heard that using modern shotshells in a Damascus barrel could destroy the barrel in a rather explosive way. Should the OP worry about this?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy 22/308 View Post
    I have heard that using modern shotshells in a Damascus barrel could destroy the barrel in a rather explosive way. Should the OP worry about this?
    Only if he plans on shooting it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy 22/308 View Post
    I have heard that using modern shotshells in a Damascus barrel could destroy the barrel in a rather explosive way. Should the OP worry about this?

    As being a antique old shotgun restorer for 30 years I can say with experience it is not unsafe to use modern nitro powder in Damascus barrels. Obviously in the UK the gun would be submitted for nitro re proof to test it like any other gun to make sure it is safe anyway. New or old. I have submitted many over the years for modern nitro load re proof with absolutely no problems with the barrels. I have seen a fair few modern steel barrels burst for whatever reason, but not a Damascus one. I shoot a Holland & Holland with Damascus barrels. It has been reproofed for nitro shells a couple of times over it's more than hundred year old now.

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    "Until gun barrels are made of cheese, they won't get stronger with age." That pretty much sums up my feelings about how to load for old guns.

    This sums up why: "The interval between trigger and tragedy is too short to change your mind."
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    Quote Originally Posted by Popeye View Post
    "Until gun barrels are made of cheese, they won't get stronger with age." That pretty much sums up my feelings about how to load for old guns.

    This sums up why: "The interval between trigger and tragedy is too short to change your mind."
    Look on the positive side, they will only blow up once......
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