Muzzleloader Questions
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Thread: Muzzleloader Questions

  1. #1
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    Default Muzzleloader Questions

    Kentucky Long Rifles (Longhunter Era)

    1. I see some octagonal barrels and some round barrels. What is more historically accurate and why?

    2. Assuming they didn't use shot due to the rifling, how did they hunt small game? Seems to me a 50, even 40 caliber would blow a squirrel to smitherins with no usable meat left.

    3. Were powderhorns waterproof?

    4. Since many had to cast their own ball, what form of lead did they carry with them? (i.e.- They didn't have tire weights to melt down back then).

    "Modern" Muzzleloader

    I'm fine with purchasing an inline muzzloader but I want a more "sportsmen" feel. For example, a Marlin 336 or a Mossberg 500 or Ruger 10/22 with wood stocks looks "traditional" and "sporting". All the inline muzzleloaders (like CVA) I see now are black stocks, camo stocks, stainless barrels, etc. I do like the break hinge action of these more modern styles though. Any help on maybe looking at other companies or other options?

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    Senior Member NGF Addict! Square target's Avatar
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    1. From what I've seen most percussion rifles were octagon. I think it was easier to make than round barrels.
    2. They made .32 and .36 caliber rifles for small game hunting.
    3. I doubt it, most stuff today that's water proof isn't. They were probably water resistant though if made right.
    4. They used pure lead and you should still use pure lead in BP guns. Wheel weights are a alloy and shouldn't be used for BP guns as they are too hard.
    5. I don't care for modern muzzle loaders. I prefer old school using granulated powder, patches and ball or lead bullets. I have some newer sabbots and powder pellets but havent gotten around to use them. Might never use them either...
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    most modern muzzle loader i ever owned was an old 45 caliber H&R Huntsman.......like this one



    that was quite a few years back. They built an updated version a few years back that used a threaded breech plug and 209 primers. I would not mind trying one of those.

    if i did that however, then that would be the excuse to go out and find an old H&R Shikari 45-70
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    AZHerper NGF Addict! gvaldeg1's Avatar
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    I really prefer the "classical" look. I have a CVA Hawken in 58 caliber. It's a lot of fun to shoot but. initially, I had problems with it because most "58 calibers" take a 0.570 patched ball. The .570 balls were way too tight in my gun. I contacted CVA and they said a lot of the early 58 Hawkens (which were made by Pedersoli in Italy) actually need .562 balls. I switched to .562 balls and it worked great. I even took 2nd place in a "turkey shoot".

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    Quote Originally Posted by deputy View Post
    most modern muzzle loader i ever owned was an old 45 caliber H&R Huntsman.......like this one



    that was quite a few years back. They built an updated version a few years back that used a threaded breech plug and 209 primers. I would not mind trying one of those.

    if i did that however, then that would be the excuse to go out and find an old H&R Shikari 45-70
    See this, I love. Nice "sporting" or "traditional' look.

    Is H&R a quality company? Is this quality enough to become an heirloom like other rifles?

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    Well apparently they don't make muzzleloaders anymore. At least there are none on their website that I can find.

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    H & R was bought out by Remington and promptly gutted.........

    however, you can still find such on sites such as [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]....

    as far as quality.....they are decent affordable utility guns. I am of the opinion that heirlooms are not about french walnut, rich blue, or a high price......but more about a reminder of the man behind the gun and the stories it could tell.......
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